JAX-WS client : what's the correct path to access the local WSDL?

jax-ws client from wsdl
soap web service client java example
java web service client from wsdl example
jax-ws tutorial
jax-ws java 8
java soap client
java soap client from wsdl
how to call soap webservice in java example

The problem is I need to build a web service client from a file I'm been provided. I've stored this file on the local file system and, while I keep the WSDL file in the correct file system folder, everything is fine. When I deploy it to a server or remove the WSDL from the file system folder the proxy can't find the WSDL and rises an error. I've searched the web and I've found the following posts yet I'm not been able to make it work: JAX-WS Loading WSDL from jar http://www.java.net/forum/topic/glassfish/metro-and-jaxb/client-jar-cant-find-local-wsdl-0 http://blog.vinodsingh.com/2008/12/locally-packaged-wsdl.html

I'm using NetBeans 6.1 (this is a legacy application I've to update with this new web service client). Below is the JAX-WS proxy class :

    @WebServiceClient(name = "SOAService", targetNamespace = "http://soaservice.eci.ibm.com/", wsdlLocation = "file:/C:/local/path/to/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl")
public class SOAService
    extends Service
{

    private final static URL SOASERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION;
    private final static Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(com.ibm.eci.soaservice.SOAService.class.getName());

    static {
        URL url = null;
        try {
            URL baseUrl;
            baseUrl = com.ibm.eci.soaservice.SOAService.class.getResource(".");
            url = new URL(baseUrl, "file:/C:/local/path/to/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl");
        } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
            logger.warning("Failed to create URL for the wsdl Location: 'file:/C:/local/path/to/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl', retrying as a local file");
            logger.warning(e.getMessage());
        }
        SOASERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION = url;
    }

    public SOAService(URL wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) {
        super(wsdlLocation, serviceName);
    }

    public SOAService() {
        super(SOASERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION, new QName("http://soaservice.eci.ibm.com/", "SOAService"));
    }

    /**
     * @return
     *     returns SOAServiceSoap
     */
    @WebEndpoint(name = "SOAServiceSOAP")
    public SOAServiceSoap getSOAServiceSOAP() {
        return super.getPort(new QName("http://soaservice.eci.ibm.com/", "SOAServiceSOAP"), SOAServiceSoap.class);
    }

    /**
     * @param features
     *     A list of {@link javax.xml.ws.WebServiceFeature} to configure on the proxy.  Supported features not in the <code>features</code> parameter will have their default values.
     * @return
     *     returns SOAServiceSoap
     */
    @WebEndpoint(name = "SOAServiceSOAP")
    public SOAServiceSoap getSOAServiceSOAP(WebServiceFeature... features) {
        return super.getPort(new QName("http://soaservice.eci.ibm.com/", "SOAServiceSOAP"), SOAServiceSoap.class, features);
    }

}

This is my code to use the proxy :

   WebServiceClient annotation = SOAService.class.getAnnotation(WebServiceClient.class);
   // trying to replicate proxy settings
   URL baseUrl = com.ibm.eci.soaservice.SOAService.class.getResource("");//note : proxy uses "."
   URL url = new URL(baseUrl, "/WEB-INF/wsdl/client/SOAService.wsdl");
   //URL wsdlUrl = this.getClass().getResource("/META-INF/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl"); 
   SOAService serviceObj = new SOAService(url, new QName(annotation.targetNamespace(), annotation.name()));
   proxy = serviceObj.getSOAServiceSOAP();
   /* baseUrl;

   //classes\com\ibm\eci\soaservice
   //URL url = new URL(baseUrl, "../../../../wsdl/SOAService.wsdl");

   proxy = new SOAService().getSOAServiceSOAP();*/
   //updating service endpoint 
   Map<String, Object> ctxt = ((BindingProvider)proxy ).getRequestContext();
   ctxt.put(JAXWSProperties.HTTP_CLIENT_STREAMING_CHUNK_SIZE, 8192);
   ctxt.put(BindingProvider.ENDPOINT_ADDRESS_PROPERTY, WebServiceUrl);

NetBeans put a copy of the WSDL in web-inf/wsdl/client/SOAService, so I don't want to add it to META-INF too. Service classes are in WEB-INF/classes/com/ibm/eci/soaservice/ and baseurl variable contains the filesystem full path to it (c:\path\to\the\project...\soaservice ). The above code raises the error:

javax.xml.ws.WebServiceException: Failed to access the WSDL at: file:/WEB-INF/wsdl/client/SOAService.wsdl. It failed with: \WEB-INF\wsdl\client\SOAService.wsdl (cannot find the path)

So, first of all, shall I update the wsdllocation of the proxy class? Then how do I tell the SOAService class in WEB-INF/classes/com/ibm/eci/soaservice to search for the WSDL in \WEB-INF\wsdl\client\SOAService.wsdl?

EDITED: I've found this other link - http://jianmingli.com/wp/?cat=41, which say to put the WSDL into the classpath. I'm ashamed to ask: how do I put it into the web application classpath?

The best option is to use jax-ws-catalog.xml

When you compile the local WSDL file , override the WSDL location and set it to something like

http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl

Don't worry this is only a URI and not a URL , meaning you don't have to have the WSDL available at that address. You can do this by passing the wsdllocation option to the wsdl to java compiler.

Doing so will change your proxy code from

static {
    URL url = null;
    try {
        URL baseUrl;
        baseUrl = com.ibm.eci.soaservice.SOAService.class.getResource(".");
        url = new URL(baseUrl, "file:/C:/local/path/to/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl");
    } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
        logger.warning("Failed to create URL for the wsdl Location: 'file:/C:/local/path/to/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl', retrying as a local file");
        logger.warning(e.getMessage());
    }
    SOASERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION = url;
}

to

static {
    URL url = null;
    try {
        URL baseUrl;
        baseUrl = com.ibm.eci.soaservice.SOAService.class.getResource(".");
        url = new URL(baseUrl, "http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl");
    } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
        logger.warning("Failed to create URL for the wsdl Location: 'http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl', retrying as a local file");
        logger.warning(e.getMessage());
    }
    SOASERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION = url;
}

Notice file:// changed to http:// in the URL constructor.

Now comes in jax-ws-catalog.xml. Without jax-ws-catalog.xml jax-ws will indeed try to load the WSDL from the location

http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl
and fail, as no such WSDL will be available.

But with jax-ws-catalog.xml you can redirect jax-ws to a locally packaged WSDL whenever it tries to access the WSDL @

http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl
.

Here's jax-ws-catalog.xml

<catalog xmlns="urn:oasis:names:tc:entity:xmlns:xml:catalog" prefer="system">
        <system systemId="http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl"
                uri="wsdl/SOAService.wsdl"/>
    </catalog>

What you are doing is telling jax-ws that when ever it needs to load WSDL from

http://localhost/wsdl/SOAService.wsdl
, it should load it from local path wsdl/SOAService.wsdl.

Now where should you put wsdl/SOAService.wsdl and jax-ws-catalog.xml ? That's the million dollar question isn't it ? It should be in the META-INF directory of your application jar.

so something like this

ABCD.jar  
|__ META-INF    
    |__ jax-ws-catalog.xml  
    |__ wsdl  
        |__ SOAService.wsdl  

This way you don't even have to override the URL in your client that access the proxy. The WSDL is picked up from within your JAR, and you avoid having to have hard-coded filesystem paths in your code.

More info on jax-ws-catalog.xml http://jax-ws.java.net/nonav/2.1.2m1/docs/catalog-support.html

Hope that helps

Creating a Simple Web Service and Client with JAX-WS, A Simple JAX-WS Client. HelloClient is a stand-alone Java program that accesses the sayHello method of HelloService . It makes this call through a� About this task The static client programming model for JAX-WS is the called the dynamic proxy client. The dynamic proxy client invokes a web service based on a service endpoint interface that is provided. After you create the proxy, the client application can invoke methods

One other approach that we have taken successfully is to generate the WS client proxy code using wsimport (from Ant, as an Ant task) and specify the wsdlLocation attribute.

<wsimport debug="true" keep="true" verbose="false" target="2.1" sourcedestdir="${generated.client}" wsdl="${src}${wsdl.file}" wsdlLocation="${wsdl.file}">
</wsimport>

Since we run this for a project w/ multiple WSDLs, the script resolves the $(wsdl.file} value dynamically which is set up to be /META-INF/wsdl/YourWebServiceName.wsdl relative to the JavaSource location (or /src, depending on how you have your project set up). During the build proess, the WSDL and XSDs files are copied to this location and packaged in the JAR file. (similar to the solution described by Bhasakar above)

MyApp.jar
|__META-INF
   |__wsdl
      |__YourWebServiceName.wsdl
      |__YourWebServiceName_schema1.xsd
      |__YourWebServiceName_schmea2.xsd

Note: make sure the WSDL files are using relative refrerences to any imported XSDs and not http URLs:

  <types>
    <xsd:schema>
      <xsd:import namespace="http://valueobject.common.services.xyz.com/" schemaLocation="YourWebService_schema1.xsd"/>
    </xsd:schema>
    <xsd:schema>
      <xsd:import namespace="http://exceptions.util.xyz.com/" schemaLocation="YourWebService_schema2.xsd"/>
    </xsd:schema>
  </types>

In the generated code, we find this:

/**
 * This class was generated by the JAX-WS RI.
 * JAX-WS RI 2.2-b05-
 * Generated source version: 2.1
 * 
 */
@WebServiceClient(name = "YourService", targetNamespace = "http://test.webservice.services.xyz.com/", wsdlLocation = "/META-INF/wsdl/YourService.wsdl")
public class YourService_Service
    extends Service
{

    private final static URL YOURWEBSERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION;
    private final static WebServiceException YOURWEBSERVICE_EXCEPTION;
    private final static QName YOURWEBSERVICE_QNAME = new QName("http://test.webservice.services.xyz.com/", "YourService");

    static {
        YOURWEBSERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION = com.xyz.services.webservice.test.YourService_Service.class.getResource("/META-INF/wsdl/YourService.wsdl");
        WebServiceException e = null;
        if (YOURWEBSERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION == null) {
            e = new WebServiceException("Cannot find '/META-INF/wsdl/YourService.wsdl' wsdl. Place the resource correctly in the classpath.");
        }
        YOURWEBSERVICE_EXCEPTION = e;
    }

    public YourService_Service() {
        super(__getWsdlLocation(), YOURWEBSERVICE_QNAME);
    }

    public YourService_Service(URL wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) {
        super(wsdlLocation, serviceName);
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @return
     *     returns YourService
     */
    @WebEndpoint(name = "YourServicePort")
    public YourService getYourServicePort() {
        return super.getPort(new QName("http://test.webservice.services.xyz.com/", "YourServicePort"), YourService.class);
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @param features
     *     A list of {@link javax.xml.ws.WebServiceFeature} to configure on the proxy.  Supported features not in the <code>features</code> parameter will have their default values.
     * @return
     *     returns YourService
     */
    @WebEndpoint(name = "YourServicePort")
    public YourService getYourServicePort(WebServiceFeature... features) {
        return super.getPort(new QName("http://test.webservice.services.xyz.com/", "YourServicePort"), YourService.class, features);
    }

    private static URL __getWsdlLocation() {
        if (YOURWEBSERVICE_EXCEPTION!= null) {
            throw YOURWEBSERVICE_EXCEPTION;
        }
        return YOURWEBSERVICE_WSDL_LOCATION;
    }

}

Perhaps this might help too. It's just a different approach that does not use the "catalog" approach.

Creating a Simple Web Service and Client with JAX-WS, java – is the service provider class that can be used by a JAX-WS client. 5.2. Web Service Endpoint Interface. JAX-WS is also used to build Web services and corresponding clients that communicate using XML to send messages or use remote procedure calls to exchange data between client and service provider. JAX-WS represents remote procedure calls or messages using XML-based protocols such as SOAP, but hides SOAP's innate complexity behind a Java-based API.

Thanks a ton for Bhaskar Karambelkar's answer which explains in detail and fixed my issue. But also I would like to re phrase the answer in three simple steps for someone who is in a hurry to fix

  1. Make your wsdl local location reference as wsdlLocation= "http://localhost/wsdl/yourwsdlname.wsdl"
  2. Create a META-INF folder right under the src. Put your wsdl file/s in a folder under META-INF, say META-INF/wsdl
  3. Create an xml file jax-ws-catalog.xml under META-INF as below

    <catalog xmlns="urn:oasis:names:tc:entity:xmlns:xml:catalog" prefer="system"> <system systemId="http://localhost/wsdl/yourwsdlname.wsdl" uri="wsdl/yourwsdlname.wsdl" /> </catalog>

Now package your jar. No more reference to the local directory, it's all packaged and referenced within

Introduction to JAX-WS, Hosting a web service is of no use until it becomes usable by a client. In this example we shall learn how to write JAX-WS client for a SOAP web� A Simple JAX-WS Client HelloClientis a stand-alone Java program that accesses the sayHellomethod of HelloService. It makes this call through a stub, a local object that acts as a proxy for the remote service. The stub is created at development time by the wsimport tool, which generates JAX-WS portable artifacts based on a WSDL file.

For those of you using Spring, you can simply reference any classpath-resource using the classpath-protocol. So in case of the wsdlLocation, this becomes:

<wsdlLocation>classpath:META-INF/webservice.wsdl</wsdlLocation>

Note that is not standard Java behavior. See also: http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/spring-framework-reference/html/resources.html

JAX-WS Client Example, Apache CXF, Services Framework - JAX-WS Configuration. to add a Web Services client to a Spring context is to use the <jaxws:client> element (similar to the� JAX-WS is a standardized set of extensions for Java to allow the construction of Java-based Web services using both POJO and WSDL interface approaches. It was developed to supersede the older JAX-RPC standard. See The JAX-WS FAQ for more details, or you can go the whole hog and download the JSR224 spec.

For those who are still coming for solution here, the easiest solution would be to use <wsdlLocation>, without changing any code. Working steps are given below:

  1. Put your wsdl to resource directory like : src/main/resource
  2. In pom file, add both wsdlDirectory and wsdlLocation(don't miss / at the beginning of wsdlLocation), like below. While wsdlDirectory is used to generate code and wsdlLocation is used at runtime to create dynamic proxy.

    <wsdlDirectory>src/main/resources/mydir</wsdlDirectory>
    <wsdlLocation>/mydir/my.wsdl</wsdlLocation>
    
  3. Then in your java code(with no-arg constructor):

    MyPort myPort = new MyPortService().getMyPort();
    
  4. For completeness, I am providing here full code generation part, with fluent api in generated code.

    <plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
    <artifactId>jaxws-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.5</version>
    
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.jvnet.jaxb2_commons</groupId>
            <artifactId>jaxb2-fluent-api</artifactId>
            <version>3.0</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>com.sun.xml.ws</groupId>
            <artifactId>jaxws-tools</artifactId>
            <version>2.3.0</version>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>wsdl-to-java-generator</id>
            <goals>
                <goal>wsimport</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <xjcArgs>
                    <xjcArg>-Xfluent-api</xjcArg>
                </xjcArgs>
                <keep>true</keep>
                <wsdlDirectory>src/main/resources/package</wsdlDirectory>
                <wsdlLocation>/package/my.wsdl</wsdlLocation>
                <sourceDestDir>${project.build.directory}/generated-sources/annotations/jaxb</sourceDestDir>
                <packageName>full.package.here</packageName>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
    

Apache CXF -- JAX-WS Configuration, JAX-WS is XML based Java API to build web services server and client application. It's part of standard Java API,� Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS), is a set of APIs for creating web services in XML format (SOAP). JAX-WS provides many annotation to simplify the development and deployment for both web service clients and web service providers (endpoints).

JAX-WS Tutorial, Java API for XML-Based Web Services (JAX-WS) tooling supports generating Java artifacts you need to develop static JAX-WS web services� Package javax.ws.rs.client. Interface Summary. Interface. Description. AsyncInvoker. Uniform interface for asynchronous invocation of HTTP methods. Client. Client is the main entry point to the fluent API used to build and execute client requests in order to consume responses returned. ClientRequestContext.

Developing a JAX-WS client from a WSDL file, This tutorial outlines the process of developing a JAX-WS web service and deploying it to the MyEclipse Tomcat server. The web service used in this tutorial is a� I'm getting started in developing web services using JAX-WS. I'm trying to implement classes I can send between my service and client using JAXB, but having trouble getting it to work. I've tried following the example at this site but cannot seem to get it to work.

Creating a JAX-WS Web Service & Client, Web Service Clients. Ok, web service is deployed properly, now let's see how to create web service client to access to the published service. 1. A Simple JAX-WS Application Client The HelloAppClientclass is a stand-alone application client that accesses the sayHellomethod of HelloService. This call is made through a port, a local object that acts as a proxy for the remote

Comments
  • Similar question: JAX-WS Loading WSDL from jar
  • ok, i'm not been able to solve the problem this way within the web application : i've tried to put wsdl inside web-inf without success, probably for my lack of knowledge. Anyway it works with a jar, so i'll make a wrapper library, as it should have been done from beginning. Thank you for your support
  • I was able to use this answer successfully and I believe that this is a better solution than all the other alternatives that other articles and tutorials document. So for me this is best practice. I just wonder why this solution is not documented in the other official articles and tutorials that cover the JAX-WS topic.
  • I like this approach... but why the META-INF directory?
  • Please note that this requires the use of JAX-WS RI 2.2, not 2.1 that comes with JDK 6 by default