Is it possible to escape a reserved word in Python?

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It may not be a good idea to name a variable after a reserved word, but I am curious:

Is there any escape syntax in Python to allow you to use a reserved word as the name of a variable?

For example, in C# this can be done by prefixing the reserved word with @

It is not possible, however it is some kind of a tradition in Python to append a _ to get a new identifier:

def drive(from_, to):
    pass

Escape argument/attribute name collides Python reserved keyword , In C# you can use the " @ " prefix to escape reserved keywords so they can be Python have an officially recognized convention in PEP-8: only possible in some languages; rarely used feature, mainly for compatibility to� Python Keywords. Keywords are the reserved words in Python. We cannot use a keyword as a variable name, function name or any other identifier. They are used to define the syntax and structure of the Python language. In Python, keywords are case sensitive. There are 33 keywords in Python 3.7. This number can vary slightly over the course of time.

No, this is not possible.

Section 2.3.1 of The Python Language Reference says that keywords 'cannot be used as ordinary identifiers' and does not specify an escape syntax.

This is probably a Good Thing, for the sake of code readability!

How to name something when the logical option is a reserved , Where ambiguity exists, a token comprises the longest possible string that forms a The following identifiers are used as reserved words, or keywords of the The backslash ( \ ) character is used to escape characters that otherwise have a� Keywords are the reserved words in Python. We cannot use a keyword as a variable name, function name or any other identifier. Here's a list of all keywords in Python Programming

If you don't mind prefixing, you can "prefix" with an underscore. Sure it'll actually be part of the variable's name, but it'll look like a prefixed reserved word. Other than that, it is not possible.

2. Lexical analysis — Python 3.8.5 documentation, In this tutorial, you will learn about keywords (reserved words in Python) and identifiers (names given to variables, functions, etc). Keywords are the reserved� It tells Python to interpret our string as a raw string, exactly as we've typed it. If we didn't prefix the string with an r, Python would interpret the escape sequences such as \b in other ways. Whenever you need Python to interpret your strings literally, specify it as a raw string by prefixing it with r.

I received an error when using the following:

for r in db.call ('ReadCashflows',
                  number = number,
                  from = date_from,
                  to = date_to):

I tried using capitals instead and now it works:

for r in db.call ('ReadCashflows',
                  number = number,
                  FROM = date_from,
                  TO = date_to):

This was possible for me because my database is ORACLE (which is case-insensitive). Remark on the code above: in my software application the actual parameters in the database are pFROM and pTO; the "p" gets added in the post-processing before the call to the database is made.

Python Keywords and Identifiers (Variable names), We also invoke the Unix utility " wc " via external shell command in 2 ways: via 1.9 Example htmlescape.py - Escape Reserved HTML Characters Python 3 has 35 reserved words, or keywords, which cannot be used as identifiers. 2.1.2. Physical lines¶. A physical line is a sequence of characters terminated by an end-of-line sequence. In source files and strings, any of the standard platform line termination sequences can be used - the Unix form using ASCII LF (linefeed), the Windows form using the ASCII sequence CR LF (return followed by linefeed), or the old Macintosh form using the ASCII CR (return) character.

db.call( ..., **{ 'from' : date_from }, **{ 'to' : date_to })

Python doesn't do those check when unpacking.

Python Tutorial, At this stage, you can treat the words class and type interchangeably. literal for a linefeed (what you get when you press the <Enter> key on the keyboard), or a tab? To solve this problem Python uses an escape sequence to represent these which names beginning with an underscore have special meaning, so a safe� Word Embedding is a language modeling technique used for mapping words to vectors of real numbers. It represents words or phrases in vector space with several dimensions. Word embeddings can be generated using various methods like neural networks, co-occurrence matrix, probabilistic models, et

2. Values, expressions, and statements — Beginning Python , Python is a versatile language but can be intimidating for first-time programmers. There are reserved keywords in Python that control the flow of the program and To avoid using special escape sequences such as newline, a raw string� Python String encode() The string encode() method returns encoded version of the given string. Since Python 3.0, strings are stored as Unicode, i.e. each character in the string is represented by a code point.

Python Programming Basics, The following keywords are reserved for use by DynamoDB. Do not use any of these words as attribute names in expressions. If you need to write an expression � 2.1.2. Physical lines¶. A physical line is a sequence of characters terminated by an end-of-line sequence. In source files, any of the standard platform line termination sequences can be used - the Unix form using ASCII LF (linefeed), the Windows form using the ASCII sequence CR LF (return followed by linefeed), or the old Macintosh form using the ASCII CR (return) character.

Reserved Words in DynamoDB, Example. The escape character allows you to use double quotes when you normally would not be allowed: txt = "We are the so-called \"Vikings\" from the north.". If possible, create double security by keeping your snake cage in an escape-proof room in your house. Don’t turn your back on an opened cage. “Just for a minute” is all the time your snake needs to exit the cage and disappear into the house somewhere. Preventing Intrusion. So that covers the importance of keeping your snake inside its cage.

Comments
  • This says we can . para3 3rd last line developers.google.com/edu/python/strings
  • I can't find anything there on escaping reserved words, only a bit about how you shouldn't use len as a variable name (and len is not a keyword).
  • python allowed my to create a list named "list" , it should not , no idea why python allowed me to user reserved words.
  • @etl_devs list is not a reserved word, it is simply the name of a builtin. Shadowing those is generally a bad idea, but it's perfectly legal.
  • although if you add any character to a keyword on either side as long as the result is a valid identifer, it's now distinct from the keyword. i.e. in is a keyword but in2 and xin are not.
  • This says we can but shouldn't. para3 3rd last line developers.google.com/edu/python/strings
  • How on earth do you add an XML attribute with the identified "class" then?
  • @aWebDeveloper: if you mean the reference to "len", that is not a keyword, but a pre-defined function, so it can be redefined at will.
  • @Stephen For "class": stackoverflow.com/questions/26764634/… (posted by Manuel ALberto Snchez Hernndez)
  • You typically don't want to prefix, because a prefixed underscore typically refers to "non-public" attributes. Postfixing is probably better.