How to merge with rebase?

git rebase
git merge
git rebase vs merge
git rebase --onto
github rebase and merge
git rebase origin/master
git rebase interactive
git merge master
git checkout featurebranch
git rebase develop
git checkout develop
git merge featurebranch

Does git have a built in command / switch to achieve the same?

There's a shorter sequence for this,

git rebase develop featurebranch
git checkout -B develop

because the merge is a fast forward, just re-hanging the label, which the checkout -B does.

An introduction to Git merge and rebase: what they are, and how to , Git Merge and Git Rebase serve the same purpose. They are designed to integrate changes from multiple branches into one. Although the final  The second way of integrating changes from one branch into another is to do a git rebase.. When merging brings two branches together while preserving the graph of each commit history, rebasing unifies the branches by rewriting changes from the source branch so they appear as children of the destination branch.

The short answer is no: Git does not have a "rebase other branch, then merge it" command. You can write a script to do it, but you will have to decide how the script should behave if the rebase stops with a conflict. Note that git rebase has a well-defined exit status: zero means "finished successfully", nonzero means "stopped with merge conflict, or failed entirely".

git, Rebasing and merging are both designed to integrate changes from one branch into another branch but in different ways. For ex. let's say we  By default, the git pull command performs a merge, but you can force it to integrate the remote branch with a rebase by passing it the --rebase option. Reviewing a Feature With a Pull Request If you use pull requests as part of your code review process, you need to avoid using git rebase after creating the pull request.

If you're using a shell on Linux, here are a couple things you could do.

Use && to move on to the next command if the previous one is successful:

git checkout featurebranch && git rebase develop && git checkout develop && git merge featurebranch

If you don't want to type that each time and you're working with the same branch each time, you could set an alias in your ~/.bashrc. Just add the following line to your ~/.bashrc file (note: you can change mergeRebaseBranchName to whatever you want):

alias mergeRebaseBranchName='git checkout featurebranch && git rebase develop && git checkout develop && git merge featurebranch'

An alias is sort of like creating a custom command. So now when you type mergeRebaseBranchName in the terminal it will run the commands for you.

Git Merge vs. Rebase: What's the Diff?, Time to Make Like a Tree and Leaf. In summary, when looking to incorporate changes from one Git branch into another: Use merge in cases  Merge the master branch into the feature branch using the checkout and merge commands. $ git checkout feature $ git merge master (or) $ git merge master feature. This will create a new “Merge commit” in the feature branch that holds the history of both branches. Git Rebase. Rebase is another way to integrate changes from one branch to another.

When do you use Git rebase instead of Git merge?, Short Version. Merge takes all the changes in one branch and merges them into another branch in one commit. Rebase says I want the point at  $ git checkout feature $ git merge master (or) $ git merge master feature. This will create a new “Merge commit” in the feature branch that holds the history of both branches. Git Rebase

Rebase as an Alternative to Merge, Rebase as an Alternative to Merge. While merging is definitely the easiest and most common way to integrate changes, it's not the only one: "Rebase" is an  Here are the steps to follow: 1. Run git fetch ¶. You should receive the latest changes from a remote git server. Thus the first step is running git fetch : git fetch. 2. Run git rebase ¶. 3. Run git push ¶.

Merging & Rebasing - Tower Help, Merging & Rebasing. Integrating changes from one branch into another can be done via merge or rebase. Before You Integrate Before starting a merge or  Fetch more commits, and merge them into your work. Next, the person who pushed the merged work decides to go back and rebase their work instead; they do a git push --force to overwrite the history on the server. You then fetch from that server, bringing down the new commits. Figure 46.

Comments
  • you could always make a git alias for it.
  • ... unless the user has configured merge to be --no-ff, that is. :-) But this is probably what the OP would like.
  • if develop has commits A,B,C and featurebranch has A,B,D wouldn't this sequence create A,B,D,C where the original would create A,B,C,D ?
  • Nope. The rebase here does exactly exactly what your first two commands do; the second does exactly (unless you've shut off default fast-forwards) what your second two commands do.
  • These sure are options but this is basically a cop out. Edited my question to make it more clear. Sigh.
  • Yeah, your questions was too broad. Now that you have edited your question to ask if git specifically has a builtin command, you could try looking up git aliases. Although, that is more complicated through git if you're trying to pack multiple commands into one alias.