diff files inside of zip without extracting it

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Is there any way to perform diff operetion on two files in two zips without extracting them? If not - any other workaround to compare them without extracting?

Thanks.

Combining the responses so far, the following bash function will compare the file listings from the zip files. The listings include verbose output (unzip -v), so checksums can be compared. Output is sorted by filename (sort -k8) to allow side by side comparison and the diff output expanded (W200) so the filenames are visible int he side by side view.

function zipdiff() { diff -W200 -y <(unzip -vql $1 | sort -k8) <(unzip -vql $2 | sort -k8); }

This can be added to your ~/.bashrc file to be used from any console. It can be used with zipdiff a.zip b.zip. Piping the output to less or redirecting to a file is helpful for large zip files.

Compare two zip files for differences, You will have to unzip them (if only in memory) to compare the two. "diff files inside of zip without extracting it" but if you want to compare the� I posted the longer explanation at "diff files inside of zip without extracting it" but if you want to compare the contents of the files within the zipfile and ignore all the metadata (timestamps in particular) then you should run:

unzip -l will list the contents of a zip file. You can then pass that to diff in the normal manner as mentioned here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/229447/how-do-i-diff-the-output-of-two-commands

So for example if you had two zip files:

foo.zip
bar.zip

You could run diff -y <(unzip -l foo.zip) <(unzip -l bar.zip) to do a side-by-side diff of the contents of the two files.

Hope that helps!

Read the contents of a zipped file without extraction?, unzip -l archive.zip lists the contents of a ZIP archive to ensure your file is inside. Use the -p option to write the contents of named files to stdout (screen) without� View content of an archived / compressed file without extracting. We can read the contents of the file that has been either compressed on gzip format or zip format. We can use vim, less as well as tar and zip commands to read the contents of compressed file. For example,

If you want to diff two files (as in see the difference) you have to extract them - even if only to memory!

In order to see the diff of two files in two zips you can do something like this (no error checking or whatsoever):

# define a little bash function
function zipdiff () { diff -u <(unzip -p $1 $2) <(unzip -p $3 $4); }

# test it: create a.zip and b.zip, each with a different file.txt
echo hello >file.txt; zip a.zip file.txt
echo world >file.txt; zip b.zip file.txt

zipdiff a.zip file.txt b.zip file.txt
--- /dev/fd/63  2016-02-23 18:18:09.000000000 +0100
+++ /dev/fd/62  2016-02-23 18:18:09.000000000 +0100
@@ -1 +1 @@
-hello
+world

Note: unzip -p extracts files to pipe (stdout).

If you only want to know if the files are different you can inspect their checksums using

unzip -v -l zipfile [file_to_inspect]

Note: -v means verbose and -llist contents)

unzip -v -l a.zip 
Archive:  a.zip
 Length   Method    Size  Cmpr    Date    Time   CRC-32   Name
--------  ------  ------- ---- ---------- ----- --------  ----
       6  Stored        6   0% 2016-02-23 18:23 363a3020  file.txt
--------          -------  ---                            -------
       6                6   0%                            1 file

unzip -v -l b.zip 
Archive:  b.zip
 Length   Method    Size  Cmpr    Date    Time   CRC-32   Name
--------  ------  ------- ---- ---------- ----- --------  ----
       6  Stored        6   0% 2016-02-23 18:23 dd3861a8  file.txt
--------          -------  ---                            -------
       6                6   0%                            1 file 

In the example above you can see that the checksums (CRC-32) are different.

You might also be interested in this project: https://github.com/nhnb/zipdiff

How to compare files inside and outside of a zip file in Windows , The obvious way would be to walk the entire way even if it's resource hungry. Add file.exe to file.zip extract file.zip to zip/file.exe compare file.exe zip/file.exe for � Just open it. This does not extract the contents. If you want to extract the zipped files, you can drag the ones you want to another place, and they will automatically be extracted. Command line zip utilities can also show you the contents of a zip file. “unzip -l whatever.zip” works for that.

I wanted the actual diff between the files in the zips in a readable format. Here is a bash function that I wrote for this purpose which makes use of git. This has a good UX if you already use git as part of your normal workflow and can read git diffs.

# usage: zipdiff before.zip after.zip
function zipdiff {
  current=$(pwd)
  before="$current/$1"
  after="$current/$2"
  tempdir=$(mktemp -d)
  cd "$tempdir"
  git init &> /dev/null
  unzip -qq "$before" *
  git add . &> /dev/null
  git commit -m "before" &> /dev/null
  rm -rf "$tempdir/*"  
  yes | unzip -qq "$after" * &> /dev/null
  git add .
  git diff --cached
  cd "$current"
  rm -rf "$tempdir"
}

Is there a safe way to run a diff on two zip compressed files?, diff files inside of zip without extracting it, Combining the responses so far, the following bash function will compare the file listings from the zip files. The listings � Question: Q: Look inside a zip file without extracting everything I often have to work with large zip archives that are really compressed installation kits, and I need to look inside, i.e. see the internal directory structure and files in the archive.

Compressed File Contents Only

I was looking for a way to compare the contents of the files stored in the zipfile, but not other metadata. Consider the following:

$ echo foo > foo.txt
$ zip now.zip foo.txt
  adding: foo.txt (stored 0%)
$ zip later.zip foo.txt
  adding: foo.txt (stored 0%)
$ diff now.zip later.zip 
Binary files now.zip and later.zip differ

Conceptually, this makes no sense; I ran the same command on the same inputs and got 2 different outputs! The difference is the metadata, which stores the date the file was added!

$ unzip -v now.zip 
Archive:  now.zip
 Length   Method    Size  Cmpr    Date    Time   CRC-32   Name
--------  ------  ------- ---- ---------- ----- --------  ----
       4  Stored        4   0% 04-08-2020 23:27 7e3265a8  foo.txt
--------          -------  ---                            -------
       4                4   0%                            1 file
$ unzip -v later.zip
Archive:  later.zip
 Length   Method    Size  Cmpr    Date    Time   CRC-32   Name
--------  ------  ------- ---- ---------- ----- --------  ----
       4  Stored        4   0% 04-08-2020 23:28 7e3265a8  foo.txt
--------          -------  ---                            -------
       4                4   0%                            1 file

Note: I manually edited the time of the second file here from 23:27 to 23:28 for clarity. The field in the file itself stores the value of seconds (which, in my case, differed -- a binary diff would still fail) even though they are not represented in the command's output.

So to diff the files only, we must ignore the date fields. unzip -vqq will get us a better summary:

$ unzip -vqq now.zip
       4  Stored        4   0% 04-08-2020 23:27 7e3265a8  foo.txt

So let's mask out the fields (we don't care about dates or compression metrics) and sort the files:

$ unzip -vqq now.zip  | awk '{$2=""; $3=""; $4=""; $5=""; $6=""; print}' | sort -k3
4      7e3265a8 foo.txt
TL;DR

The command to diff 2 zipfiles (a.zip and b.zip) is

diff \
  <(unzip -vqq a.zip  | awk '{$2=""; $3=""; $4=""; $5=""; $6=""; print}' | sort -k3) \
  <(unzip -vqq b.zip  | awk '{$2=""; $3=""; $4=""; $5=""; $6=""; print}' | sort -k3)

7-Zip: How to list contents of a folder and subfolder of zip files without extracting (Win XP,Vista,7 and Command Line) Posted November 3, 2010 by Jimmy S in Batch file programming This tech-recipe will explain how to use 7-Zip to create a text file (tab delimited) listing of the contents of a zip file.

To create a ZIP file as before and also include the archive sub-directory, use this command. zip -r -q source_code archive/ *.c *.h. To be considerate to the person who will be extracting the files from the ZIP file you’re creating, it is often polite to create ZIP files with the files inside it contained in a directory.

I have a large zip file that contains man files, folders, and other zip files. I am using C# and I want to view the contents of the big zip file in a treeview and be able to expand the folders and zip files tree nodes in order view the contents of those folders or zip files inside this bigger zip file.

Hi All, I would like to extract specific file from a zip archive. I have a zip archive "sample.zip". sample.zip contains few text files and images text1.txt, text2.txt, pic.jpg etc I need to read specific file "text2.txt" from "sample.zip" WITHOUT EXTRACTING the zip file. Please Suggest.

Comments
  • Do you only want to know if the two files differ or do you want to get a visual diff ?
  • If you want to know whether they are different then use sha512 filename1 and sha512 filename2 and see if the output is the same.
  • Very helpful, thanks, I found it was made even better by adding --suppress-common-lines, as suggested in another comment below.
  • Adding the --suppress-common-lines flag to display only the lines that differ worked out really well for me: diff -y <(unzip -l foo.zip) <(unzip -l bar.zip) --suppress-common-lines
  • I ended up with function zipdiff() { diff -y <(unzip -l $1) <(unzip -l $2) --suppress-common-lines; }, and that worked flawlessly for what I was trying to do.
  • This won't detect a change to an existing file that happens to leave it at the same size. -vql instead of -l prints the checksums, but these are CRC32 (meaning they won't reliably detect intentional tampering the way a cryptographic hash function will).