Having trouble viewing more than 10 rows in a tibble

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First off - I am a beginner at programming and R, so excuse me if this is a silly question. I am having trouble viewing more than ten rows in a tibble that is generated from the following code.

The code below is meant to find the most common words in a book. I am getting the results I want, but how do I view more than 10 rows of data. To my knowledge, it is not being saved as a data frame that I can call.

library(dplyr)
tidy_books %>%
    anti_join(stop_words) %>%
    count(word, sort=TRUE)
Joining, by = "word"
# A tibble: 3,397 x 2
   word       n
   <chr>  <int>
 1 alice    820
 2 queen    247
 3 time     141
 4 king     122
 5 head     112
 6 looked   100
 7 white     97
 8 round     96
 9 voice     86
10 tone      81
# ... with 3,387 more rows

What I often do when I want to see the output of a pipe like that is pipe it straight to View()

library(dplyr)
library(tidytext)

tidy_books %>%
    anti_join(stop_words) %>%
    count(word, sort=TRUE) %>%
    View()

If you want to save this to a new object that you can work with later, you can assign it to a new variable name at the beginning of the pipe.

word_counts <- tidy_books %>%
    anti_join(stop_words) %>%
    count(word, sort=TRUE)

Printing tibbles, More persistent control is available by setting the options described below. n. Number of rows to show. If NULL , the default, will print all rows if less than option This currently defaults to FALSE , because many terminal fonts have poor  The default print option within tibbles mean they will only display 10 rows if the data frame has more than 20 rows (I’ve changed mine to display 5 rows). Neat. Along side that we now only view columns that will fit on the screen. This is already looking quite the part. The row settings can be changed via. options(tibble.print_max = 3, tibble.print_min = 1) So now if there is more than 3 rows, we print only 1 row. Tibbles of length 3 and 4 would now print as so.

Although this question has a perfectly ok answer, the comment from @Marius is much shorter, so:

tidy_books %>% print(n = 100)

As you say you are a beginner you can replace n = 100 with any number you want

Also as you are a beginner, to see the whole table:

tidy_books %>% print(n = nrow(tidy_books))

Tibbles, They keep the features that have stood the test of time, and drop the features that 3 c #> 4 d #> 5 e #> 6 f #> 7 g #> 8 h #> 9 i #> 10 j #> # … with 16 more rows be a problem when combining thousands of messy inputs into one tidy data frame. options(tibble.print_max = n, tibble.print_min = m) : if there are more than n  tibble_df %>% show_rows(40) With this new function "show_rows" you would select the number of rows that you want to see. Sometime 10 rows it is to little and change the general options it is may not appropriate for all the tibbles that you have. Also could be a good idea to have show_all_rows() and show_all_columns(). Thank you very much

If you want to stay in the console, then note that tibbles have print S3 methods defined so you can use options such as (see ?print.tbl):

very_long <- as_tibble(seq(1:1000))
print(very_long, n = 3)
# A tibble: 1,000 x 1
  value
  <int>
1     1
2     2
3     3
# ... with 997 more rows

Note, tail doesn't play with tibbles, so if you want to combine tail with tibbles to look at the end of your data, then you have to do something like:

print(tail(very_long, n = 3), n = 3)
# A tibble: 3 x 1
  value
  <int>
1   998
2   999
3  1000

10 Tibbles, Tibbles have a refined print method that shows only the first 10 rows, and all the But sometimes you need more output than the default display. you to solve the same problems with clearer code (but you will learn a little about it in vector  Tibbles have nice printing method that show only the first 10 rows and all the columns that fit on the screen. This is useful when you work with large data sets. When printed, the data type of each column is specified (see below):

View more rows as a command · Issue #483 · tidyverse/tibble · GitHub, Sometime 10 rows it is to little and change the general options it is may not appropriate for all the tibbles that you have. Also could be a good  > df # A tibble: 10 x 4 ID SEQ VALUE OTHER <dbl> <chr> <dbl> <chr> 1 1 a 10 A 2 1 b -10 B 3 1 b 10 C 4 1 b 50 D 5 2 c -20 E 6 2 c 20 F 7 2 c 60 G 8 2 d -30 H 9 2 d 30 I 10 2 d 70 J I want to drop the row pairs (2,3), (5,6), (8,9) because VALUE negates the VALUE in the matching previous row.

The Trouble with Tibbles, The default print option within tibbles mean they will only display 10 rows if the data frame has more than 20 rows (I've changed mine to display  One of the main features of the tbl_df class is the printing: Tibbles only print as many rows and columns as fit on one screen, supplemented by a summary of the remaining rows and columns. Tibble reveals the type of each column, which keeps the user informed about whether a variable is, e.g., &lt;chr&gt; or &lt;fct&gt; (character versus factor). Printing can be tweaked for a one-off call by

R for Data Science: Import, Tidy, Transform, Visualize, and Model Data, But sometimes you need more output than the default display. There are a few tibble.print_min = m): if more than m rows, print only n rows. View() Subsetting So far all the tools you've learned have worked with complete data frames. Overview. A tibble, or tbl_df, is a modern reimagining of the data.frame, keeping what time has proven to be effective, and throwing out what is not.Tibbles are data.frames that are lazy and surly: they do less (i.e. they don’t change variable names or types, and don’t do partial matching) and complain more (e.g. when a variable does not exist).

Comments
  • Try View(tidy_boooks) or head(tidy_books, 20)
  • tibbles intentionally only print a few rows - you can send the result through %>% print(n = 20) to see more.
  • The suggestion by @Marius is probably the most elegant, however you can also simply wrap your entire statement with as.data.frame.
  • Possible duplicate of View entire data frame when wrapped in tbl_df?
  • for some reason, print(n = ...) turns on scientific notation in the tibble display. is there away to avoid that?