Disable a part of Java Program during JUnit testing

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I am testing my Java program with JUnit. The program includes some JavaFX GUI interface and other logging code. However, during testing, I don't want these to be tested. Is there any way to switch the code between testing and development?

The description can be abstract, I'll use an example:

public class Helloworld {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static int greetingCnt = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Helloworld helloword = new Helloworld();
        helloword.greetWorld();
        helloword.greetWorld();
        helloword.greetWorld();
        System.out.println("Greating count: " + greetingCnt);
    }

    public void greetWorld() {
        System.out.println("Hello World!");
        ++greetingCnt;
        //some other computation...
    }

}

In this example, if I only want to test the correct number of greetingCnt but not want to have anything printed or any extra computation to be performed. But during actual program execution, there is no influence on the function of the program. May I know if there is any way to do it?

Thank you!

It is impossible without additional effort from you.

Computer simply have no way to tell which computation affect what.

You can turn off specific features like printing to console by replacing default PrintWriter, but there is no generic solution.

How to disable JUnit Test - @Ignore annotation , 1) Ignoring a single test method in JUnit, just annotate method with We will first run this program without disabling any method and then  That's all about how to disable JUnit tests temporarily in Java. You can disable a single test or a whole test class by using @Ignore annotation at method or class level. You can disable a single test or a whole test class by using @Ignore annotation at method or class level.

For your specific case : you could use PowerMock in order to mock System.out, but the be honest I ignore the whole side effects it might have.


More generally : what you are looking for is called Mock object, and basically allows an instance of an Object to do nothing be the just minimum to run through your code.

For your case, mocking System.out would allow you to run through the calls to System.out.println() without actually calling those. So as a result, your code would execute as if it was :

public class Helloworld {

/**
 * @param args the command line arguments
 */
public static int greetingCnt = 0;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Helloworld helloword = new Helloworld();
    helloword.greetWorld();
    helloword.greetWorld();
    helloword.greetWorld();
    // System.out.println("Greating count: " + greetingCnt);
}

public void greetWorld() {
    // System.out.println("Hello World!");
    ++greetingCnt;
    //some other computation...
}

I could go further in explaining how it really occurs, but I guess this is enough for your answer. If you are curious, you could look at runtime execution of your tests to inspect the real type of your mocked objects.

JUnit @Ignore Test Annotation with Example, To ignore a test, JUnit provides @Ignore annotation to disable the You can provide the reason for disabling a test in the optional It will help other developers working on the same piece of code, to understand "why a particular test is disabled? Let's create a JUnit test class to test JUnitMessage.java. In  JUnit @Disabled annotation can be used to disable the test methods from test suite. This annotation can be applied over a test class as well as over individual test methods. It accepts only one optional parameter, which indicates the reason this test is disabled.

You would first need to make your Java program configurable.

One way to do this is using Java property files. You can then use specific properties to disable parts of your program.

During testing you can then use one property file, and during normal execution another.

The property file is typically a resource on the Java class path. Then you can run the tests with a classpath containing the property files describing the test configuration.

JUnit Disable Enable Tests, During his studies, he was already heavily involved in a number of small to large projects where he primarily contributes by doing programming,  JUnit 5 provides a @Disabled annotation to disable test class or test methods. 2. JUnit Disabling Tests Example Entire test classes or individual test methods may be disabled via the @Disabled annotation, via one of the annotations discussed in Conditional Test Execution, or via a custom ExecutionCondition.

JUnit Disable Test Example, Sometimes you want to temporarily disable a test or a group of tests. Also, you can annotate a class containing test methods with @Ignore and none of the containing java.lang.String, value. The optional reason why the test is ignored. Note that the test report shows that there were 3 test cases disabled or ignored during the test runner ran. 4. Conclusion. We’ve learned how to disable or ignore a test method, a group of tests, or a test class by using JUnit 5 @Disabled annotation. When you use that feature, remember to back to all the disabled tests to fix them later.

Ignore (JUnit API), A detailed look at JUnit 5's @Disabled, @DisabledOnOs, having a quick look at their implementation to prepare you for the last part: creating custom conditions​. You can find all code samples in my JUnit 5 demo project on GitHub. tests can be disabled when the suite runs on selected Java versions. It is an open-source testing framework for java programmers. The java programmer can create test cases and test his/her own code. It is one of the unit testing framework. Current version is junit 4. To perform unit testing, we need to create test cases. The unit test case is a code which ensures that the program logic works as expected. The org

JUnit 5 Conditions: @Enabled, @Disabled, And Customized, This article is part of my blog series on automated testing promoting my new In the last article in this series, we covered how to use JUnit test interfaces to encourage good behavior. to execute, so it would be best not to execute them with every code commit. Automated TestingJavaJUnitJUnit 5Spring  JUnit Examples. JUnit is a unit testing framework for the Java programming language. JUnit has been important in the development of test-driven development, and is one of a family of unit testing frameworks which is collectively known as xUnit. JUnit is suitable for only unit testing, not for integration test.

Comments
  • The problem seems to be in the way the code is structured, that is the printing and the increment are done in the same place. I'm not sure how this can be fixed in this example (maybe increment elsewhere and test that function?) but maybe it can be done in your actual case.
  • Hi Federico, thanks for the comments. What i am thinking is if there is anything equivalent to #define or preprocessor in Java, so that the program is able to change behavior a little bit according to different scenarios.
  • abstraction is the key to writing testable code - separate your concerns then write actual unit tests. SOLID is your friend.
  • hi talex, thanks so much for your answer. the helloworld program is just a example of course. I was thinking if there is anything like a generic switch for the whole program so I can toggle between testing mode and normal development mode.
  • @EugeneH you can take inspiration from what logging frameworks do. You set a logging level and when you call the logging method you specify at which level it should and should not log. I highly doubt that spraying your code with ifs is an elegant and maintainable solution
  • @EugeneH no there is no such switch because it is theoretically impossible to implement it.
  • hi @avandeursen thanks so much for the answer. So from what I understand, the property files is like loading configurations, however, after getting the configurations, how can I implement the separation of testing and dev code? Shall I use if statement or switch/case statement? Or there is another more systematic way of doing it? Really appreciate your help :)