dotnet core app run as administrator

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requestedexecutionlevel

I have a dotnet console application that requires administrator privileges to run. I can't find how to do this. In a regular project I would add a app.manifest and set

<requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" />

but I can't figure how to embed this in the build.

How do I do this?

This is not supported on .NET Core.

.NET Core implements that (extended) subset of .NET Framework features which are known to be cross-platform.

An application requesting and receiving elevate privileges is not supported on many non-Windows platforms. Hence it is not supported by .NET Core.

(Dropping privileges, on the other hand, might be supported by more platforms)

NET Core executables, dotnet build does not produce an executable, and dotnet app.dll does not use the executable, so I can see why it's going  Steps To Force.Net App To Run As Administrator Go to Visual Studio Solution Explorer, right-click the project and select Add >> New Item…. In the Add New Item window, select Application Manifest File and press Add. Now, go back to solution explorer and under the project, find the.manifest file and open it.

I found the simplest workaround would be to add the app.manifest file with the setting like what in net framework app

<requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" />

then on your net core project file (.csproj in C# project) add the following:

<PropertyGroup>
  <ApplicationManifest>app.manifest</ApplicationManifest>
</PropertyGroup>

*Worked in Console and WPF netcore 3.0

While working on a desktop application I required admin access to my application. There are chances that you might face this requirement  So First create windows application if you don’t have one by followingthe below steps. Click on New Project- Windows-Windows Form Application.-Enter the desired application name and click on OK. You application will get created with default form 1. I have made some basic changes to make the application more understandable.

In .NET core 2.X and earlier, the app.manifest appears to be ignored. However you can detect whether you are running as administrator and provide an error message to the user.

Simply call MainClass.RequireAdministrator() as the first thing in your Main method. This will work to give an error message on Windows and Linux if the process was not started as administrator/root. You may need to add the Windows compatibility NuGet package for it to work on Windows.

This does not force elevation, but at least the user gets a helpful error telling them how to resolve the problem.

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Security.Principal;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public static class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            RequireAdministrator();
        }

        [DllImport("libc")]
        public static extern uint getuid();

        /// <summary>
        /// Asks for administrator privileges upgrade if the platform supports it, otherwise does nothing
        /// </summary>
        public static void RequireAdministrator()
        {
            string name = System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName;
            try
            {
                if (RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.Windows))
                {
                    using (WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())
                    {
                        WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(identity);
                        if (!principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator))
                        {
                            throw new InvalidOperationException($"Application must be run as administrator. Right click the {name} file and select 'run as administrator'.");
                        }
                    }
                }
                else if (getuid() != 0)
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException($"Application must be run as root/sudo. From terminal, run the executable as 'sudo {name}'");
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("Unable to determine administrator or root status", ex);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is step by step illustration to force a dot net client server application to run as administrator and the trick to bypass UAC prompt while  With .NET Core executables, dotnet build does not produce an executable, and dotnet app.dll does not use the executable, so I can see why it's going in a DLL and not the published EXE. It would be a bit of a split in behavior where the published EXE has a different behavior than dotnet run. There are two solutions that I think can help, for now.

To extend jjxtra's answer, if you are running cross-platform, obviously his answer won't work in non-Windows instances. I know... "pinvoke baaaaad", but in this case i think it's OK since there is no alternative that i know of.

So, for linux/mac, you could add this code in:

private static class LinuxNative
{
    [DllImport("libc")]
    public static extern uint getuid();
}

var isRoot = LinuxNative.getuid() == 0;

monitoring tools, requires admin permission because of operating system rules​. dotnet tool commands, such as dotnet tool install. dotnet run --no-build NET Core tools that require elevated permissions to execute. During development, you may need elevated access to test your application. Are you using .NET Core 3? This guide is for .NET Core 2 only. Check out our updated guide for .NET Core 3.X here : Hosting An ASP.NET Core Web App As A Windows Service In .NET Core 3. I recently came across the need to host a .NET Core web app as a Windows Service. In this case, it was because each machine needed to locally be running an API.

As omajid already pointed out in a comment, there is currently no way to force the elevation. You may however still be able to run the Terminal (Powershell, CMD etc.) with Administrator Privileges. That will also run your App with the same privileges - aka - Admin privileges. I needed that for the HttpListener to add prefixes to it.

Debug applications that a run under a different user account, such as ASP.NET websites. Debug ASP.NET and AJAX applications. Debug in  The dotnet run command provides a convenient option to run your application from the source code with one command. It's useful for fast iterative development from the command line. It's useful for fast iterative development from the command line.

Learn how to host an ASP.NET Core app in a Windows Service. If the app is running as a Windows Service, the method: for a service, use the New-​LocalUser cmdlet from an administrative PowerShell 6 command shell. If it's a framework-dependent application (the default), you run it by dotnet yourapp.dll. If it's a self-contained application, you run it using yourapp.exe on Windows and ./yourapp on Unix. For more information about the differences between the two app types, see the .NET Core Application Deployment article on .Net Docs.

config update your app will boot as admin by default. Running .NET as Admin. First we want to modify the application manifest that is embedded  You probably need to set your application as an x64 app. The IIS Snap In only works in 64 bit and doesn't work in 32 bit, and a process spawned from a 32 bit app seems to work to be a 32 bit process and the same goes for 64 bit apps. Look at: Start process as 64 bit

If you need to run external program from C# code with Administrator privileges, this code NET Windows Desktop Apps and Visual Studio App Center Net Core 3.0 · Generate a PDF from the Report Viewer (Web Form), in ASP.net & C#​  See this PDF for the ASP.NET Core MVC version. The ASP.NET Core 1.1 version of this tutorial is in this folder. The 1.1 ASP.NET Core sample is in the samples. This tutorial shows how to create an ASP.NET Core web app with user data protected by authorization. It displays a list of contacts that authenticated (registered) users have created.

Comments
  • You might be out of luck. This is a feature that is not available cross-platform in a consistent manner. .NET Core tries to only implement features that are available everywhere.
  • Added an answer that shows how to do this in .NET core, it's not perfect and doesn't pop up the elevation box, but at least the user gets an error message.
  • Added an answer that shows how to do this in .NET core, it's not perfect and doesn't pop up the elevation box, but at least the user gets an error message.
  • I guess when I wrote this answer the windows compat pack did not exist. Please do keep in mind that it still only works on Windows. That nullifies one of the benefits of .NET Core which is cross platform compatibility.
  • .NET Core 3.0 starts to support this (for WinForms and WPF) (eg. github.com/dotnet/winforms/issues/192)
  • So you can confirm that app.manifest is being honored in net core 3?
  • @jjxtra yes as far as you add manually and modify the csproj; as mentioned above