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Here's how one might list all files matching a pattern in bash:

ls *.jar

How to list the complement of a pattern? i.e. all files not matching *.jar?

ls | grep -v '\.jar$'

for instance.

List files not matching given string in filename, I have a set of files in a directory: chap1, chap2, chap3, test.c, hello.pl I want to list all those files which do not start with chap. How do I use. I have a set of files in a directory: chap1, chap2, chap3, test.c, hello.pl I want to list all those files which do not start with chap. How do I use list files NOT matching a pattern

Use egrep-style extended pattern matching.

ls !(*.jar)

This is available starting with bash-2.02-alpha1. Must first be enabled with

shopt -s extglob

As of bash-4.1-alpha there is a config option to enable this by default.

list files NOT matching a pattern, This Linux find command using the “not” operator creates a list of all files not ending with the .html file extension (filename pattern). Also, if you're  ! -name '*.jar' looks for all files that don't match the regex *.jar. Like I said, it's a little overkill for this application, but if you remove the -maxdepth 1, you can then recursively search for all non-jar files or what have you easily.

Little known bash expansion rule:

ls !(*.jar)

Linux find command: How to find files not matching a pattern , I have a file with joker character patterns: ./include/* ./src/*. etc. From the current directory I would like to recursively get the list of files that do not match these  First, note that you are not using regular expression patterns. Your first example should be: list.files(pattern='data-.*\\.csv', recursive=TRUE) Then, it seems the pattern matching inside list.files is applied to the file basenames (i.e., not including the directory path) so you could split the task into: Find all files matching the basename

POSIX defines non-matching bracket expressions, so we can let the shell expand the file names for us.

ls *[!j][!a][!r]

This has some quirks though, but at least it is compatible with about any unix shell.

How to get list of files that don't match patterns in bash?, find files NOT matching name pattern. Original Post -name ful* \) -mtime +1 -​exec ls -lt {} \; find: bad option ful_1234_test1.txt find: path-list predicate-list. Code​:. To find all items in the current directory that do not match a PowerShell wildcard, supply that wildcard to the -Exclude parameter: Get-ChildItem -Exclude *.txt To find all items in subdirectories that match a PowerShell wildcard, use the -Include and -Recurse parameters, or use the wildcard as part of the -Path parameter:

With an appropriate version of find, you could do something like this, but it's a little overkill:

find . -maxdepth 1 ! -name '*.jar'

find finds files. The . argument specifies you want to start searching from ., i.e. the current directory. -maxdepth 1 tells it you only want to search one level deep, i.e. the current directory. ! -name '*.jar' looks for all files that don't match the regex *.jar.

Like I said, it's a little overkill for this application, but if you remove the -maxdepth 1, you can then recursively search for all non-jar files or what have you easily.

find files NOT matching name pattern, ls | grep -vi pattern - (List files that DO NOT match a pattern ). The best command line collection on the internet, submit yours and save your  This prints the lines which do not contain the pattern. You can add the -l option to print just the file name; but this still prints the names of any file which contains any line which does not contain the pattern. I believe the OP wants to find the files which do not contain any line which contains the pattern. – tripleee Jan 12 '16 at 6:51

List files that DO NOT match a pattern Using grep, ls, The pattern rules for glob are not regular expressions. Instead, they To list files in a subdirectory, you must include the subdirectory in the pattern: import glob  The pattern matching works with the case of file names as returned by the OS. On a POSIX filesystem recursive listings will follow symbolic links to directories. path must specify paths which can be represented in the current codepage, and files/directories below path whose names cannot be represented in that codepage will most likely not be found.

glob – Filename pattern matching, The glob() function searches for all the pathnames matching pattern Returns an array containing the matched files/directories, an empty array if no file matched For instance, if you do glob("a*.php") on the following list of files, all of the files  A pattern is a string or list of newline-delimited strings. File and directory names are compared to patterns to include (or sometimes exclude) them in a task. You can build up complex behavior by stacking multiple patterns. See fnmatch for a full syntax guide. Match characters. Most characters are used as exact matches. What counts as an

glob - Manual, See section Shell Pattern Matching, for a description of the pattern arguments to Thus, `find -name '*macs'' does not match a file named `.emacs', but `locate So, to list the regular files in your home directory that were modified yesterday, do​. finding all files that do not match a certain pattern I hope I'm asking this the right way -- I've been sending out a lot of resumes and some of them I saw on Craigslist -- so I named the file as 'Craigslist -- (filename)'.

Comments
  • this probably shouldn't be labeled regex, * is a shell-globbing wildcard, and is not a regular expression *, which is the "zero or more quantifier".
  • Good point, although I'm learning that using regex is probably better practice for getting the matches you expect.
  • How can you do two filetypes?
  • @Silver89, ls | grep -v -e '\.one$' -e '\.two$' for instance.
  • Don't parse the output of ls, thank you.
  • It would be a bit more efficient to use ls --ignore='\.jar' to prevent having to call another program.
  • @xizdaqrian, good point, didn't know about that. But it's gnu-only, I believe.
  • Yay for mentioning the shopt -s extglob!
  • This is the correct answer. The answer marked as correct doesn't use the shell directly, it uses an ancillary command.
  • @dbw - Even if I like more this answer, the accepted answer is ok for the question. The OP does not specifically ask for using "the shell directly".
  • "egrep-style" is quite misleading, as grep deals with regular expressions, while this here are shell patterns.
  • It did not work for me. For long lists returning about 2000 items, I got "argument list to long". I guess it happens because the branches expand the outputs of the command inside them. So it becomes an argument list with about 2000 items which is really long.
  • bash: !: event not found. What do I need?