How do I read this python code? var1 = var2 == var3

I'm struggling to understand what this represents

var1 = var2 == var3

My guess would be that this is equivalent to:

if (var2 == var3):
     var1 = var2

The assignment var1 = var2 == var3 works more like this:

if var2 == var3:
    var1 = True
else:
    var1 = False

If you evaluate the expression var2 == var3 on the REPL you will get True or False depending on they comparing equal or not. In Python you can assign any expression to a variable so the resulting value would be assigned to var1 in your example.

In Python a == b is an expression but the assignment a = b is a statement. In many languages both are expressions - for example in Javascript you are allowed to do (although not very good style):

a == (b = c)

In Python it is not allowed (SyntaxError):

a == (b = c)

The controverse PEP 572 introduces the new assignment operator := that is an expression.

Programming with Python for Social Scientists, 40 41 my_list = [var1, var2, var3, var4, var5] 42 my_dict = {"First Variable": var1, Using this knowledge, run the script (i.e. press F5, or go to the IDLE editor Hence, Python is being told to read in the value not as an integer, but as a string. Re: if first.var1 and first.var2 and first.var3 then Posted 07-31-2013 (2441 views) | In reply to learner_sas If you can tell us what you want then we can try to see how (of if) you can do it using FIRST. processing.

var1 = var2 == var3

Means:

  1. create a variable called var1

  2. Assign it to the True False Boolean which is var2 equals to var3 (using the == operator)

Here's an example:

>>> var2=1
>>> var3=1
>>> var2==var3
True
>>> var1 = var2==var3
>>> var1
True
>>> 

Mastering Machine Learning with Python in Six Steps: A Practical , Example code for membership operators var1 = 'Hello world' # string var1 = {1:'a',​2:'b'}# dictionary print('H' in var1) print('hello' not in var2) print(1 in var2) print('a' in var2) See Table 1-9 and Listing 1-13. operators var1 = 5 var1 = 5 var2 = '​Hello' var2 = 'Hello' var3 = [1,2,3] var3 = [1,2,3] print(var1 is not var1) print(var2 is​  Python: histogram/ binning data from 2 arrays. python,histogram,large-files. if you only need to do this for a handful of points, you could do something like this. If intensites and radius are numpy arrays of your data: bin_width = 0.1 # Depending on how narrow you want your bins def get_avg(rad): average_intensity = intensities[(radius>=rad-bin_width/2.) & (radius<rad+bin_width/2.)].mean

Equality operator == has precedence over = assignment. So this equates to:

var1 = (var2 == var3)  # Boolean

The == operator itself will return either True or False; it is this value that is assigned.

Python Programming with the Java Class Libraries: A Tutorial for , With Python, you can see the variables in the namespace, and you can see what variables a given object exposes. dir() func(var1,var2,var3,var4) ['lvar1',  The assignment var1 = var2 == var3 works more like this: if var2 == var3: var1 = True else: var1 = False If you evaluate the expression var2 == var3 on the REPL you will get True or False depending on they comparing equal or not. In Python you can assign any expression to a variable so the resulting value would be assigned to var1 in your example.

Your assumption is incorrect. The code you posted would be this:

var2 = 1
var3 = 1

var1 = var2 == var3

#var1 is true because var2 and var3 are equal 

[PDF] Programming Fundamentals with Python, On windows, it may be necessary to run python.exe. ○ To leave the omitted by starting the script with. – #!/usr/bin/python Examples. ○ Read all the lines in a file print var1, var2, var3, list1 If __name__ == '__main__': do stuff  Understanding sql count (*) as X, var1, var2, var3, and purpose of "group by". Posted 06-03-2017 (1145 views) I am trying to understand this code inherited from a coworker who is no longer here:

Learn Programming in Python with Cody Jackson: Grasp the basics of , Grasp the basics of programming and Python syntax while building real-world The following is a simple program that should help explain this idea a little better. scope_example.py (part 1) 1 var1 = 1 # global variable 2 3 if var1 == 1: 4 var2 (var2)) 6 7 def my_funct(): 8 var3 = 3 # local variable 9 var1 = 42 # shadows  Line 4 - There are two errors here, including the show stopper. As stated above, Python uses indention to define code blocks. count = count + 1, is part of a block of code that starts on line 2, so that it must be indented 4 spaces in order for Python to include it in the code block.

Python print(), If you read our tutorial on Python Functions and arguments, then you should '​string-2' # initialize 3rd variable var3 = float(23.42) print(var1, var2, var3) Suppose in the previous code, you want to separate the values using underscore​(_). How to use variables in SQL statement in Python? (3) Ok so I'm not that experienced in Python. I have the following Python code: cursor.execute("INSERT INTO table VALUES var1, var2, var3,") where var1 is an integer, var2 & var3 are strings.

CHARMM-GUI, def function_name(myvar=default_value): # function code goes here #!/usr/bin/​env python def myfunc(var1, var2=2, var3='three'): print var1, var2, var3 # prints "​10 3 echo_numbers(var1, var2=None): if var2 == None: var2 = 2 * var1 print var1, var2 echo_numbers(1, The second function is easier to read and shorter. Hi all, For my question I'm using a dataset similar to the one below: data sample; input var1 $ var2 $ var3 $ var4 $ x1 $ x2 $ x3 $ x4 $; datalines; a b c d 9 8 7 6 b

Comments
  • First one will return either true or false and var1 will represent this result
  • No, it's not equivalent to that at all. It assigns the result of var2 == var3 to var1
  • Ah, beat me to it :)
  • @ViaTech That happens to me a lot too, 😊