Ignoring case in d(b)plyr verbs

dbplyr
dbplyr write to database
dbplyr copy_to
dbplyr github
dplyr
dbplyr between
rstudio dbplyr
dbplyr slice

The database I am querying does not respect case when it comes to column names. for example the following columns exist in different tables:

PERSONID PERSONiD PersonID Personid PersonId

Using standard d(b)plyr verbs is getting very frustrating. Is it possible to turn off the case sensitivity for dbplyr verbs?

I think this can be done by using regular expression when selecing data columns.

A very much similar question with answer can be found at select-columns-of-data-table-based-on-regex.

In your case, regular expression might be written as [Pp][Ee][Rr][Ss][Ii][Dd].

Type-logical Semantics, (b) So many flowers arrived today that Sandy had to stay home to arrange them. (d) Our guest arrived so tired that we put her to bed. Ignoring the issue of the extraposition, explain how the meaning of the discontinuous so For one derivation of the try to find case, reduce the quantifier inside the controlled verb phrase. Creating reprexes for dbplyr is particularly challenging because you are probably using a database that you can’t share with me. Fortunately, in many cases you can still demonstrate the problem even if I don’t have the complete dataset, or even access to the database system that you’re using.

You can change all of the column names of your result to a consistent case with rename_all. For example to make them all lower case:

rename_all(df, tolower)

[PDF] Package 'dbplyr', BugReports https://github.com/tidyverse/dbplyr/issues. Depends R tbl.src_dbi. Use dplyr verbs with a remote database table Needed for compatibility with generic; currently ignored. Details If is translated into case when. 1 Ignoring case in d(b)plyr verbs Aug 31 '18 1 Python Launcher automatically opens Jun 16 '17 0 Text box in Inkscape does not automatically resize when editing Oct 5 '19

Or you can change the column names of your dataframe (df) to lowercase using:

 names(df) <- tolower(names(df))

SAT Prep Course, Choice (D) might be right if it wasn't at the end of the paragraph, but leaving a The answer is (B). 12. This question is another subject-verb agreement fiasco. Two-player aggressive games are “cathartic” (again the needed reference is the and choice (B) is in the subjunctive case and not the proper objective case. Is there any way around this, or possibly dev plans to accommodate the ignore_case arguments or fixed() or regex() for database table filtering? geotheory changed the title Handling case sensitivity with remote database table operations Ignoring case with remote database table filter operations Aug 28, 2018

SAT Prep Course EBook, Choice (D) might be right if it wasn't at the end of the paragraph, but leaving a The answer is (B). 12. This question is another subject-verb agreement fiasco. Two-player aggressive games are “cathartic” (again the needed reference is the and choice (B) is in the subjunctive case and not the proper objective case. @CarolineBarret commented on Aug 2, 2018, 1:14 PM UTC: I am working with R 3.4.3 and dplyr 0.7.4. I am trying to apply the case_when() function to a tibble object from a database. But when I combin

Ignoring case with remote database table filter operations · Issue , I can't figure out how to apply a non-case-sensitive filter query to a remote There's unfortunately no way that dbplyr can translate every stringr  The sql_ generics are used to build the different types of SQL queries. The default implementations in dbplyr generates ANSI 92 compliant SQL. The db_ generics execute actions on the database. The default implementations in dbplyr typically just call the standard DBI S4 method.

Chembers 21 Century Dictionary, Also called cramp-iron, o verb (cramped, cramping) to fasten with a cramp. slender beaked fruits. cranial /'kremial/ D- adj relating to or in the region of the skull. o noun 1 (usually craps) a gambling game on which the player rolls two dice. 9 (often crash out) slang a to fall asleep; b to sleep at someone else's place. e>  There are two components to dplyr’s SQL translation system: translation of vector expressions like x * y + 10. translation of whole verbs like mutate() or summarise(). To explore them, you’ll need to load both dbplyr and dplyr:

Comments
  • what database platform are you using?
  • PostgreSQL for example returns column names in all lower case, while Oracle returns them in all upper case. If you want to write code that will run on either platform, you have this problem.
  • Or start the chain by tbl(con, df) %>% rename_all(toupper) %>% ..., not sure if it's supported though
  • Yes, it is supported. It's one of the examples in the docs.