XmlWriter - disposable

I am having trouble understanding the way XmlWriter works in C#. Take the following code as if it hypothetically was used somewhere.

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
XmlWriterSettings settings = new XmlWriterSettings();
settings.Encoding = new UTF8Encoding(false);
settings.ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Document;
settings.Indent = true;

XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings);

// Do stuff

writer.Close();

Since XmlWriter is not used within an using statement, could this potentially result in an OutOfMemoryException due to it not being properly disposed?


Ultimately, the purpose of the Dispose() in this case is to allow the XmlWriter to assume ownership of whatever it is writing to - for example, if you create an XmlWriter over a Stream, calling Dispose() on the XmlWriter can (by default) flush the xml writer and then call Dispose() on the stream. This makes it easy to pass an XmlWriter to APIs without also having to pass them a chain of other objects they need to dispose when they're done (it could, for example, be an XmlWriter talking to a CompressionStream talking to a SslStream talking to a NetworkStream, etc).

In the general case, the purpose of the Dispose() on the final end thing is to close the underlying resource (which could be a file, a socket, a pipe, etc)

In this specific case, you're talking to a StringBuilder. The Dispose() here is basically a no-op, as there is no external resource. It'll just be collected by the GC either way, at some point in the future. As such, no: there is no memory leak problem here; the GC can see what you're doing.

So: in this case it won't make a functional difference, but: it is good practice to get into the habit of calling Dispose() (usually via using) when that is part of the API, as in many cases this is really, really important.

XmlWriter.Dispose Method (System.Xml), async Task TestWriter(Stream stream) { XmlWriterSettings settings = new XmlWriterSettings(); settings.Async = true; using (XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter. I am having trouble understanding the way XmlWriter works in C#. Take the following code as if it hypothetically was used somewhere. StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(); XmlWriterSettings


Its good to have using block, where it ensures calling the Dispose on any object that implements IDisposable.

using (XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
{
     //do stuff
}

The Dispose method for XmlWriter looks like-

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (this.WriteState != WriteState.Closed)
    {
        try
        {
            this.Close();
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    }
}

XmlWriter Class (System.Xml), For disposable (implements IDisposable) objects, the using using (var stringWriter = new StringWriter()) { using (var xmlWriter = XmlWriter. Remarks. This member is an explicit interface member implementation. It can be used only when the XmlWriter instance is cast to an IDisposable interface.. This member may behave differently when it is used in a Portable Class Library project.


It could potentially cause memory issues if there would be an exception in

// Do stuff

In this scenario, the Close method would not be executed. Using statement is a syntactic sugar around try-finally blocks. It calls Dispose in finally block even there was an exception

XmlWriter.Dispose calls Close method behind the scene

A common using statement mistake in C#, Using XmlTextWriter without closing the base stream. disposable and b: I feel ownership for (in particular if I explicitely created it), then my� System.Xml.XmlWriter provides an easy and lightweight way to write xml strings, unfortunately it has a little gotcha. consider the following xml string (borrowed from IronPython in Action): Using XmlWriter the following code is needed to create that string: Keep in mind the fact that the code above only creates 5 lines of xml, and as…


according to c# docs The using statement ensures that Dispose is called even if an exception occurs within the using block. You can achieve the same result by putting the object inside a try block and then calling Dispose in a finally block; in fact, this is how the using statement is translated by the compiler. The code example earlier expands to the following code at compile time (note the extra curly braces to create the limited scope for the object):

        {
            var font1 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f);
            try
            {
                byte charset = font1.GdiCharSet;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (font1 != null)
                    ((IDisposable)font1).Dispose();
            }
        }

and close function is do the same thing This method calls Dispose, specifying true to release all resources. You do not have to specifically call the Close method. Instead, ensure that every Stream object is properly disposed. You can declare Stream objects within a using block (or Using block in Visual Basic) to ensure that the stream and all of its resources are disposed, or you can explicitly call the Dispose method.

Using XmlTextWriter without closing the base stream, As a side note: always dispose disposable objects: using (var stringWriter = new StringWriter()) using (var xmlTextWriter = XmlWriter.Create(stringWriter))� There is some issues filed for XmlWriter about async write operation using sync write/flush on dispose: #29464, #31104. From the issues apparently In ASP.NET Core 3.x for HTTP Response/Request streams now sync operation is disabled by de


XMLWriter (Stardog-7.3.1 API), class to create the required output. Disposable � XmlWriter using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Text; using System.Xml; using CMS. Creates a new XmlWriter instance using the specified XmlWriter and XmlWriterSettings objects. Dispose() Releases all resources used by the current instance of the XmlWriter class.


Convert XmlDocument to String - c# - csharp, guarantee that every disposable object will follow that recommendation. In fact, a good example of this is the System.Xml.XmlTextWriter class� XMLWriter's core part is the mapping editor that lets you visually map input data records onto an XML tree structure (see Figure 54.12, “Mapping Editor”). By dragging the input ports or fields onto XML elements and attributes you map them, effectively populating the XML structure with data.


Export to PDF, protected void, exportKMLLatLonBox(XMLStreamWriter xmlWriter). protected void public void dispose(). Description copied from interface: Disposable. XMLWriter does not propagate metadata. XMLWriter has no metadata template. The XMLWriter output port must have one field of string, byte or cbyte type. XMLWriter can write lists and maps. List are written as particular items; maps are converted to a string before writing.