dynamically render button from stateless functional component

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I have stateless functional child component that looks like this

const MultiChoiceQuestion = props => (
  <div>
    <h1>{props.questionText}</h1>
    <button>{props.choice}</button>
  </div>
)

I would like this component to dynamically generate buttons based on the array in my parent component.

class CNA extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {

    }

    const choiceArray = ['1', '2', '3']
    choiceArray.map(questionChoice => {
      return questionChoice
    })

  }
  render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <p>This is the cna survey</p>
      <MultiChoiceQuestion questionText="Hello" choice={this.questionChoice} />
      </React.Fragment>
    )
  }

So basically, because there are 3 items in my choicesArray, I would like 3 buttons generated. Any ideas?

In the constructor, you should define choiceArray as an instance property, not just a var within the function: this.choiceArray = ['1', '2', '3']

Then move the map() to within the JSX of the render function:

{this.choiceArray.map(questionChoice => <MultiChoiceQuestion questionText="Hello" choice={questionChoice} /> ) }

First React component, This component is just a simple stateless function which return some React You can then render the React element produced in a similar fashion as in For that we could add a refresh button in our component which would� So for the example HelloWorld component, I can assert that when the render function is called with the value of ‘Cory’ for props.name, it returns a div with ‘Hi Cory’ inside. With React’s stateless functional components, each component can be easily tested in isolation.

You can do something like this:

getQuestions = () => {
    return this.choiceArray.map(questionChoice => {
      return <MultiChoiceQuestion questionText="Hello" choice={questionChoice} />
    })
}

render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <p>This is the cna survey</p>
      {this.getQuestions()}
      </React.Fragment>
    )
  }

How to Dynamically Render React Components, So, how do we handle rendering components when we have no idea how I realized a simple way to handle this very dynamic array of objects was Older Post: Loading State Trick for Stateless Functional Components in React Click the button to view this course or go to Courses for more information. Our component is now programmatically listing out Jake, Jon and Thruster! You can check out the working code here! Best practices. The last thing we’ll do is tidy our code up a bit. As your components grow in size you’ll want to abstract as much code out of the return statement as possible. This typically requires setting your desired

class CNA extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      choiceArray: ['1', '2', '3']
    }
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <p>This is the cna survey</p>
        { this.state.choiceArray.map((choice) => {
            return <MultiChoiceQuestion questionText="hello" choice={choice} />
          })
        }
      </React.Fragment>
    )
  }

Loading State Trick for Stateless Functional Components in React , A stateless functional component is simply a function that returns the markup Newer Post: How to Dynamically Render React Components. Preventing Component from Rendering . In rare cases you might want a component to hide itself even though it was rendered by another component. To do this return null instead of its render output. In the example below, the <WarningBanner /> is rendered depending on the value of the prop called warn.

This is how you can create dynamic button based on array and select particular button on click.

class CNA extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      choiceArray: ['1', '2', '3']
    }
  }
  handleSelected=selected=>{
    console.log(selected)
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <p>This is the cna survey</p>
        {this.state.choiceArray.map(choice=>
          <MultiChoiceQuestion questionText="Hello"
           choice={choice} handleClick={()=>this.handleSelected(choice)}/> 
        )}
      </React.Fragment>
    )
  }
}
const MultiChoiceQuestion = props => (
  <div style={{display:'flex'}}>
    <h1>{props.questionText}</h1>
    <button onClick={props.handleClick}>{props.choice}</button>
  </div>
)

Loading React Components Dynamically on Demand, Refer to the updated post, Loading React Components Dynamically on Demand Within IfApp.render() , one would use a if/switch statement to check what type of render() simply has 3 buttons and handles the click event. When overriding component, you can pass in a stateless functional component or React component class where you supply your own render logic and optionally add other handlers or behavior. This is

Five Ways to Convert React Class Components to Functional , With Hooks, you can create functional components that uses state and lifecycle methods. This class alerts a name when a user clicks a button: let's update our code to dynamically update the <h3> header on the page. Functional (Stateless) Vs Class (Stateful) components you will often need to render components dynamically depending on the situation. make use of them in the Greeting component to render

Components and Props – React, Components let you split the UI into independent, reusable pieces, and think A button, a form, a dialog, a screen: in React apps, all those are commonly expressed as components. For example, we can create an App component that renders Welcome many Of course, application UIs are dynamic and change over time. When you override a component, you have the option to pass in a stateless functional component or React component class and later provide your own rendering behavior, or better yet, add different handlers. Think of it as a form of dependency injection that can unleash endless possibilities.

7 Ways to Implement Conditional Rendering in React Applications , With React, we can build Single Page Applications that are dynamic and in our component state, we want to be able to display a Login button if As a result of this, we create a new functional component called AuthButton . Great idea! I did try this in the beginning, but I was forced to render the fields using a Dynamic Component for a variety of reasons (the fields span multiple objects and require different expressions for their value based on some settings). – Matt K Dec 12 '13 at 21:11

Comments
  • Thanks for explaining where I went wrong, really appreciate it
  • Awesome, thanks bro. I didn't know the array had to live in the state