How to implement setters and getters with String and int at the same time?

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I know how to "setValue" the "getValue" however how you do "getValue" in this case?

public void setInfo(String name, int age) {
    setName(name);
    setAge(age);
}

Is there a way to getInfo with string and int at the same time?


There are multiple ways, one is given below:

public Object[] getInfo() {
    Object[] info = new Object[2];
    info[0] = getName();
    info[1] = getAge();
    return info;
}

How to implement setters and getters with String and Int at the same , Let me explain: 1- Giving a setter breaks incapsulation Many people are implement setters and getters with String and Int at the same time in� Hello, IMO, you should nerver do this. Let me explain: 1- Giving a setter breaks incapsulation Many people are always thinking that incapsulation is a three step process which requires : 1. putting a data in a “restricted area” (like private, and


As per code , what I assume that both name and age are part of the InfoObject, so you can return the whole object in getInfo() call, ex-

public InfoObject getInfo() {
    return infoObject();
}

Because you can not return two values from same function. If you don't want to use this way, In that case you have to write two seperate methods for name and age each. like:

public String getName() {
    return this.name;
}

and

public int getAge() {
    return this.age;
}

This way you can make your code clean and understandable.

Java Getter and Setter: Basics, Common Mistakes, and Best , In this post, we take a closer look at getter and setter methods in Java, common int num = obj.number; // same as above So, like primitive types, you can safely implement getter and setter for a String variable, like this:. Getters and setters are used to protect your data, particularly when creating classes. For each instance variable, a getter method returns its value while a setter method sets or updates its value. Given this, getters and setters are also known as accessors and mutators, respectively. By convention, getters start with the word "get" and setters with the word "set", followed by a variable name


In some programming language such as swift ,there is "tuple" can return with two value at the same time.

However in the Java world you there is no official "tuple", but you can do something similar:

public class Pair<F, S> {
    public F first;
    public S second;
}

in your case:

Pair<String, Integer> mValue;

public void setInfo(String name, int age) {
    mValue = new Pair<String, Integer>(name, age);
}

public Pair<String, Integer> getInfo() {
    return mValue;
}

Java Getter and Setter Tutorial, Implementing getters and setters for common object types public void setNumber( int num) { int num = obj.number; // same as above So, like primitive types, you can safely implement getter and setter for a String variable like this: have time and budget, consider to learn more from this Java course. Because we defined the getter and setter, we can implement other features, such as inputting a parameter to the setter. This allows us to add custom logic to a setter. For example, we never want age to be input as less than zero.


You may try the following method:

public Object[] getValue(){
    return new Object[]{getName(), getAge()};
}

Hope, you already have methods like getName() and getAge() as you have setName(String name) and setAge(int age).

Setter and Getter Methods in Java, public class Cat { public String name; public int age; public int weight; public Cat( String name, You should always create getters and setters. Here we're using both getters and setters. First, we use a getter to get and display the cat's original name. Then, we use a setter to assign a new name ("Mr. Smudge"). And then we use the getter once again to get the name (to check if it really changed). Console output: Cat's original name: Smudge Cat's new name: Mr. Smudge So what's the


I usually use java.util.Map when i need to do that, for example:

private Map<String, Object> getInfo() {
    Map<String, Object> result;
    result.put("name", name);
    result.put("age", age);
    return result;
}

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Collections.html

Getters and Setters in Java Explained, public class Vehicle { private String color; // Getter public String getColor() Once the getter and setter have been defined, we use it in our main: public void setNumber(int number) { if (number < 1 || number > 10) { throw� If you find yourself wondering whether you should write setters or getters, you got to ask yourself some questions about the code your are writing and the type (class) you are implementing.


Learn C# Properties: Getters and Setters at Intermediate C# Course, Take a look at how I rewrote the same code above, using properties this time. Create a class Flower with 4 public properties: string Name, string Color, int Age, � Encapsulation is a basic concept in OOP. It is about wrapping data and code as a single unit. In this case, it is a good practice to declare the variables as private and then access them through Getters and Setters to view and/or modify them.


Getters and Setters Java Example, We'll demonstrate the use of setter and getter methods in Java. the setter/getter methods then Java encapsulation throws a compile-time public NewEmployee( int id, String name, String designation, String company) {. Get and Set. You learned from the previous chapter that private variables can only be accessed within the same class (an outside class has no access to it). However, it is possible to access them if we provide public get and set methods.


Classes, We've been using classes as objects (String, ArrayList, HashMap, Integer, as well as arrays which is a basic way to create multiple variables of the same type. lot of new concepts to discuss in this example so let's explore them one at a time. them through methods called getters and setters (or accessors and mutators). If you’re ever in doubt, always use getters/setters. Adding Getters and Setters. Encapsulation is a basic concept in OOP. It is about wrapping data and code as a single unit. In this case, it is a good practice to declare the variables as private and then access them through Getters and Setters to view and/or modify them.