Bind Vs Lambda?

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I have a question about which style is preferred: std::bind Vs lambda in C++0x. I know that they serve -somehow- different purposes but lets take an example of intersecting functionality.

Using lambda:

uniform_int<> distribution(1, 6);
mt19937 engine;
// lambda style
auto dice = [&]() { return distribution(engine); };

Using bind:

uniform_int<> distribution(1, 6);
mt19937 engine;
// bind style
auto dice = bind(distribution, engine);

Which one should we prefer? why? assuming more complex situations compared to the mentioned example. i.e. What are the advantages/disadvantages of one over the other?


As you said, bind and lambdas don't quite exactly aim at the same goal.

For instance, for using and composing STL algorithms, lambdas are clear winners, IMHO.

To illustrate, I remember a really funny answer, here on stack overflow, where someone asked for ideas of hex magic numbers, (like 0xDEADBEEF, 0xCAFEBABE, 0xDEADDEAD etc.) and was told that if he were a real C++ programmer he would simply have download a list of English words and use a simple one-liner of C++ :)

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>

int main()
{
    using namespace boost::lambda;
    std::ifstream ifs("wordsEn.txt");
    std::remove_copy_if(
        std::istream_iterator<std::string>(ifs),
        std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
        std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"),
        bind(&std::string::size, _1) != 8u
            ||
        bind(
            static_cast<std::string::size_type (std::string::*)(const char*, std::string::size_type) const>(
                &std::string::find_first_not_of
            ),
            _1,
            "abcdef",
            0u
        ) != std::string::npos
    );
}

This snippet, in pure C++98, open the English words file, scan each word and print only those of length 8 with 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e' or 'f' letters.

Now, turn on C++0X and lambda :

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main()
{
 std::ifstream ifs("wordsEn.txt");
 std::copy_if(
    std::istream_iterator<std::string>(ifs),
    std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
    std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"),
    [](const std::string& s)
    {
       return (s.size() == 8 && 
               s.find_first_not_of("abcdef") == std::string::npos);
    }
 );
}

This is still a bit heavy to read (mainly because of the istream_iterator business), but a lot simpler than the bind version :)

Why use std::bind over lambdas in C++14?, Lambda vs Bind�. Consider the following function: template <typename Function > void do_test_loop(Function func, const uint64_t upper_limit� Get the source code for this program lambda_vs_bind.cpp. It has been compiled and tested with g++ 4.6.2, but any compiler with good support for the C++0x standard should be perfectly fine with it. It has been compiled and tested with g++ 4.6.2, but any compiler with good support for the C++0x standard should be perfectly fine with it.


C++0x lambdas are monomorphic, while bind can be polymorphic. You cannot have something like

auto f = [](auto a, auto b) { cout << a << ' ' << b; }
f("test", 1.2f);

a and b must have known types. On the other hand, tr1/boost/phoenix/lambda bind allows you to do this:

struct foo
{
  typedef void result_type;

  template < typename A, typename B >
  void operator()(A a, B b)
  {
    cout << a << ' ' << b;
  }
};

auto f = bind(foo(), _1, _2);
f("test", 1.2f); // will print "test 1.2"

Note that the types A and B are not fixed here. Only when f is actually used these two will be deduced.

Lambda vs Bind — Gockel Hut, std::bind() doesn't just bind the first N arguments like many C++ engineers are better off as lambdas. std::bind(&MyClass::OnDone, this). vs. In the bound version, the instance of Abc can be reached inside the event handler through 'this', which you cannot in the lambda version. So i would use bind if I have need to reach the instance. If only the event.target (aka the element my-btn) is needed, I'd usually prefer the lambda. – Shilly Feb 8 '17 at 16:10


The C++ 0x lamdba syntax is more readable than the bind syntax. Once you get into more than 2-3 level bind, you code becomes pretty much unreadable and difficult to maintain. I would prefer the more intuitive lambda syntax.

Tip of the Week #108: Avoid std::bind, Effective Modern C++:bind and lambda. Function binding. std::bind can create a function which is binded to another one: void originalFunc(int a, double b, string� The call wrapper created by the bind expression calls different functions depending on the arguments you give it, the closure from a C++14 polymorphic lambda can take different types of arguments but can't take a different number of arguments, and always invokes (specializations of) the same function on the closure.


One of the benefits of lambdas is they are way more useful when you need to add a little big of logic on top of an existing function.

With bind, you are forced to create a new function/method/functor even if the logic is only ever needed in this one place. You need to come up with an appropriate name and it can make the code less understandable as it potentially makes you split up related logic.

With lambda, you can add the new logic inside the lambda (but are not forced to if it makes sense to create a new callable).

Effective Modern C++:bind and lambda – Wangxin's Blog, I double-checked the last example you presented concerning runtime performances of std::bind Duration: 13:53 Posted: Jun 20, 2016 The call wrapper created by the bind expression calls different functions depending on the arguments you give it, the closure from a C++14 polymorphic lambda can take different types of arguments but can't take a different number of arguments, and always invokes (specializations of) the same function on the closure.


I think it's more a matter of taste. People that quickly grasp new technologies, or are familiar with functional programming will probably prefer lambda syntax, while more conservative programmers will definitively prefer bind, as it is more in par with the traditional C++ syntax.

Such a decision should be made in coordination with the people that will be working with the code, probably through a majority vote.

Which doesn't change the fact however, that lambda syntax is much more powerful and cleaner.

https://github.com/peter-can-write/cpp-notes/blob/, The point being made here is heavily obfuscated to my eye due to the seemingly needless use of std::invoke when working with the lambda� What is a Lambda? A lambda is a way to define a block & its parameters with some special syntax. You can save this lambda into a variable for later use. The syntax for defining a Ruby lambda looks like this: say_something = -> { puts "This is a lambda" } You can also use the alternative syntax: lambda instead of ->.


C++ Weekly - Ep 16 Avoiding `std::bind`, #include <iostream> #include <functional> using std::placeholders::_1; // to be used in std::bind example int stdf_foobar (int x, std::function<int(int)> moo) { return � ASP.NET Core Blazor data binding. 03/26/2020; 7 minutes to read; In this article. By Luke Latham and Daniel Roth. Razor components provide data binding features via an HTML element attribute named @bind with a field, property, or Razor expression value.


Why std::bind can't be formally deprecated, Syntax; Capture by value vs by reference; Lambda's type; Lambda's type, such as functions, objects, lambdas and the result of std::bind . A lambda’s type is implementation defined, and the only way to capture a lambda with no conversion is by using auto: auto f2 = [](){}; However, if your capture list is empty you may convert your lambda to a C-style function pointer: void (*foo)(bool, int); foo = [](bool, int){}; Lambda’s scope. All captured variables have the scope of the


C++ - std::function with lambda and std::bind, The attached file is a simple example using std::bind to show how it operates. When the std::bind call itself is executed, the generated code calls new to allocate a descriptor. When a call is made through the std::bind function pointer, the generated code walks through the descriptor, building the parameter block for the called function. Use a