Powershell - Why is Using Invoke-WebRequest Much Slower Than a Browser Download?

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I use Powershell's Invoke-WebRequest method to download a file from Amazon S3 to my Windows EC2 instance.

If I download the file using Chrome, I am able to download a 200 MB file in 5 seconds. The same download in PowerShell using Invoke-WebRequest takes up to 5 minutes.

Why is using Invoke-WebRequest slower and is there a way to download at full speed in a PowerShell script?

Without switching away from Invoke-WebRequest, turning off the progress bar did it for me. I found the answer from this thread: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/issues/2138 (jasongin commented on Oct 3, 2016)

$ProgressPreference = 'SilentlyContinue'
Invoke-WebRequest <params>

For my 5MB file on localhost, the download time went from 30s to 250ms.

Note that to get the progress bar back in the active shell, you need to call $ProgressPreference = 'Continue'.

Is there a way to speed up web requests? : PowerShell, I want to make an invoke-webrequest against an API but the .json files get quite large, Is there a way to fetch faster the load just seems quite slow. Free virtual PowerShell Conference with keynote speaker Jeffery Snover Download: https ://github.com/TheJaysH/ScriptRunner/releases/tag/v1.0. Source:� Powershell - Why is Using Invoke-WebRequest Much Slower Than a Browser Download? Tag: powershell , amazon-ec2 , amazon-s3 , powershell-v3.0 I use Powershell's Invoke-WebRequest method to download a file from Amazon S3 to my Windows EC2 instance.

I was using

Invoke-WebRequest $video_url -OutFile $local_video_url

I changed the above to

$wc = New-Object net.webclient
$wc.Downloadfile($video_url, $local_video_url)

This restored the download speed to what I was seeing in my browsers.

Fixing Invoke-WebRequest, Why was downloading using Invoke-WebRequest so slow? bar turned on significantly impacts the speed at which Invoke-WebRequest downloads. running Invoke-WebRequest reduced the time it took to download Terraform from 60 AZURE � DEVOPS � powershell � terraform � Invoke-WebRequest. If I download the file using Chrome, I am able to download a 200 MB file in 5 seconds. The same download in PowerShell using Invoke-WebRequest takes up to 5 minutes. Why is using Invoke-WebRequest slower and is there a way to download at full speed in a PowerShell script?

One-liner to download a file to the temp directory:

(New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadFile("https://www.google.com", "$env:temp\index.html")

Invoke-RestMethod is slow and uses a lot of memory � Issue #6199 , Performance of Windows PowerShell is better then PowerShell Core # -is- using-invoke-webrequest-much-slower-than-a-browser-download. Feel free to close if is the case :) Release note: Invoke-WebRequest much slower than a browser download What this PR does / why we need it: Invoke-WebRequest much slower than a browser download when the progress bar is shown by an order of magnitude.

I just hit this issue today, if you change the ContentType argument to application/octet-stream it is much faster (as fast as using webclient). The reason is because the Invoke-Request command will not try and parse the response as JSON or XML.

Invoke-RestMethod -ContentType "application/octet-stream" -Uri $video_url  -OutFile $local_video_url

feat(perf): Invoke-WebRequest much slower then browser download , feat(perf): Invoke-WebRequest much slower then browser download #4294 / powershell-why-is-using-invoke-webrequest-much-slower-than-a-browser-� Powershell - Why is Using Invoke-WebRequest Much Slower Than a Browser Download? powershell,amazon-ec2,amazon-s3,powershell-v3.0 I use Powershell's Invoke-WebRequest method to download a file from Amazon S3 to my Windows EC2 instance. If I download the file using Chrome, I am able to download a 200 MB file in 5 seconds.

3 ways to download files with PowerShell - blog, 3 ways to download files with PowerShell The first and most obvious option is the Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet. This cmdlet is slow. Another potentially serious con for this method is the reliance on Internet Explorer. If I download the file using Chrome, I am able to download a 200 MB file in 5 seconds. The same download in PowerShell using Invoke-WebRequest takes up to 5 minutes. Why is using Invoke-WebRequest slower and is there a way to download at full speed in a PowerShell script?

invoke-webrequest pro tips, So here's some pro-tips for parsing the output using PowerShell fast and effectively: The commandlet does some DOM parsing by default using Internet Explorer. you're using Invoke-WebRequest to download some large binaries and want to see it's progress, but it significantly slows things down too. Using wildcards to download a file with Invoke-WebRequest. Why is Using Invoke-WebRequest Much Slower Than a Browser Download? Powershell Invoke-WebRequest

downloading files – Scripting Blog, Use PowerShell to Download and Install DSC Resource Kit Now I create a webclient object, and I call the DownloadFile method. are appearing online, and TechEd Australia is coming up as I write this, I decided to redo my script, but possibly make it much smaller. You can view the RSS feed directly in your browser. Disabling progress bars speeds up Invoke-WebRequest The PowerShell progress bar makes Invoke-WebRequest dramatically slower than it needs to be. This adds a command to disable the progress bar, and then re-enable it once the download is complete.

Comments
  • Is IE configured to use a proxy which Chrome is not on your system?
  • @alroc File is downloaded at the same speed in IE as in Chrome. It only slows down using Invoke-WebRequest
  • Please show your code. What kind of memory utilization are you seeing while the download is happening in PowerShell?
  • This makes a huge difference for us too (tens of seconds down to less than a second for 10-30MB files) - I always had a suspicion that it was the progress display slowing things down but didn't know how to stop it doing it.
  • For a 100MB file this reduces the time from 10 Minutes to 2 Seconds. I wish developers would think more about the architecture of their software.
  • A lesson on how not to implement a progress bar.
  • For my 280MB file, it went from 33 minutes to 28 seconds. Crazy!
  • It appear the progress bar updates after every byte, which is utter madness.
  • So I just ran wc.downloadFile(ibm-s3-url, "./test.tar.gz"), it did something, presumably download that file, but it didnt put it in my working directory... any idea where it might have gone?
  • @Groostav Mine showed up in c:\windows\system32. Not exactly the first place I'd look when downloading to a relative location.
  • How does this answer the question?
  • Lloyd asked: "is there a way to download at full speed in a PowerShell script?" This answer is a one-liner way to do that. Downloading to the temp directory is the canonical way to demonstrate this.
  • Invoke-WebRequest, which the OP is already using, does internally the same what WebClient.DownloadFile.
  • -ContentType is for POST requests only AFAIK so it probably won't make a difference.
  • You'd be better off using the -UseBasicParsing parameter but that won't make much of a difference for static files. Setting $ProgressPreference = 'SilentlyContinue' before calling Invoke-WebRequest greatly improves the performance.