How convert between different kinds of multidimensional arrays in Julia

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I'm migrating from python/numpy to julia. I'm really confused by Julia's multidimensional arrays and it feels like there is some additional level of complexity / hassle (in comparison to numpy).

There is distinction between 1)row-vectros 2)column-vectors, 3)multidimensional arrays and 4)nested arrays (=Arrays of arrays). That would be all fine (perhaps useful for performance optimization), assuming there is simple way how to convert between them. But I cannot figure out how to do it.

Simple example: I just try to generate 2D rectangular grid of points and plot them

ps = [ [ix*0.1 iy*0.1] for ix=1:10, iy=1:10 ]
# 10×10 Array{Array{Float64,2},2}:
# Oh, this is nested array? I wand just simple 3D array 10x10x2

scatter( ps[:,:,1], ps[:,:,2], markersize = 2, markerstrokewidth = 0, aspect_ratio=:equal )
# ERROR: BoundsError: attempt to access 10×10 Array{Array{Float64,2},2} at index [Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(10)), Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(10)), 2]

sh = size(ps)
# (10,10)

ps = reshape( ps, ( sh[1]*sh[2],2) )
# ERROR: DimensionMismatch("new dimensions (100, 2) must be consistent with  array size 100")
# Oh dear :(

ps = reshape( ps, ( sh[1]*sh[2],:) )
# 100×1 Array{Array{Float64,2},2}

xs = ps[:,1]
# 100-element Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
# ??? WTF? ... this arrays looks like whole 'ps' 
ys = ps[:,2] 
# ERROR: BoundsError: attempt to access 100×1 Array{Array{Float64,2},2} at index [Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(100)), 2]

xs = ps[:][1]
# 1×2 Array{Float64,2}: 
#  0.1  0.1
#  But I want all xs  (ps[:,1]), not (ps[1,:]) 

# Let's try some broadcasting
xs = ps.[1]
# ERROR: syntax: invalid syntax "ps.[1]"
xs = .ps[1]
# ERROR: syntax: invalid identifier name "."


# Perhaps transpose will help?
ps_ = ps'   #' stackoverflow syntax highlighting for Julia is broken ?
# 1×100 LinearAlgebra.Adjoint{LinearAlgebra.Adjoint{Float64,Array{Float64,2}},Array{Array{Float64,2},2}}:
# OMG! ... That is even worse

scatter( ps[:,1], ps[:,2], markersize = 2, markerstrokewidth = 0, aspect_ratio=:equal )
# Nope

OK this somehow works. But still I need to figure out how to convert between the different shapes of arrays above

using Plots
ps = [ [ix*0.1 iy*0.1] for ix=1:10, iy=1:10 ]
ps = vcat(ps...)
xs = ps[:,1]
ys = ps[:,2]
scatter( xs, ys, markersize = 2, markerstrokewidth = 0, aspect_ratio=:equal )

EDIT:

Maybe it could be good to list some tutorials where I was searching the answer before I asked:


Julia works in column-major fashion, so the basic vector is a column vector. To convert a column vector to a row vector, use permutedims(colvec). To convert a row vector to a column vector, use permutedims(rowvec).

julia> colvec = [1, 2, 3]
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

julia> rowvec = permutedims(colvec)
1×3 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  3

julia> permutedims(rowvec)
3×1 Array{Int64,2}:
 1
 2
 3

To convert a matrix (or any 2-dimensional array) to a column vector, use vec. Because Julia stores 2-dimensional arrays by column, this will traverse each column in turn. Note that 2D array dimensions are shown as <rows>x<cols> Array{<type>,2}.

julia> matrix = [1 4 
                 2 5 
                 3 6]
3×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6  

julia> colvec = vec(matrix)
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6

To convert that colvec back to the original array requires knowing the dimensions of that that original array. ndims(x) counts the dimensions of x and size(x) gives the number of elements in each dimension of x.

julia> reshape(colvec, size(matrix))
3×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6

You can transpose the entries with permutedims(matrix).

julia> matrix
3×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6

julia> permutedims(matrix)
2×3 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  3
 4  5  6

The same principles apply to higher dimensional arrays.

array = reshape(collect(1:12), (3, 2, 2))
3×2×2 Array{Int64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6

[:, :, 2] =
 7  10
 8  11
 9  12

julia> vec(array)
12-element Array{Int64,1}:
  1
  2
  3
  4
  5
  6
  7
  8
  9
 10
 11
 12

For working with nested arrays, I suggest using RecursiveArrayTools.jl.

Multi-dimensional Arrays · The Julia Language, discerning how to convert between different representations of array Reinterpret examples for converting Julia multi-dimensional arrays and Suppose I have a type representing the Homogeneous coordinates of a  As such, it's also possible to define custom array types by inheriting from AbstractArray. See the manual section on the AbstractArray interface for more details on implementing a custom array type. An array is a collection of objects stored in a multi-dimensional grid. In the most general case, an array may contain objects of type Any.


There's quite a lot in the code above, but just focusing on your point of departure and the intended outcome:

Why nested array?

Your comprehension creates the array [ix*0.1 iy*0.1] for every combination of ix and iy, so I would argue you explicitly asked for it.

There are probably some whizzy ways to either do this with a fancy comprehension or somehow flatten the nested array, but in cases like this one I like to be explicit about what I'm trying to achieve:

ps = zeros(10,10,2) # 10x10x2 Array{Float64,3}
for ix = 1:10, iy = 1:10
        ps[ix, iy, :] = [ix*0.1 iy*0.1]
end

If it's about having a one-liner you can consider creating both 10x10 arrays in comprehensions and then concatenating those along a third dimension:

ps = cat([ix*0.1 for ix=1:10, iy=1:10], [iy*0.1 for ix=1:10, iy=1:10], dims = 3)

Reinterpret examples for converting Julia multi-dimensional arrays , An array is a collection of objects stored in a multi-dimensional grid. stride(A,k), the stride (linear index distance between adjacent elements) along dimension k zeros(A), an array of all zeros with the same type, element type and shape as A common promotion type then they get converted to that type using convert() . Multi-dimensional Arrays. Julia, like most technical computing languages, provides a first-class array implementation. Most technical computing languages pay a lot of attention to their array implementation at the expense of other containers. Julia does not treat arrays in any special way.


Others have have given replies that help solve your problem, so I'd rather just go through your example and try to explain what is going on. You seem pretty frustrated, which is not uncommon when learning a new language, but most of your complaints seem to be because Julia is being consistent.

ps = [ [ix*0.1 iy*0.1] for ix=1:10, iy=1:10 ]
# 10×10 Array{Array{Float64,2},2}:
# Oh, this is nested array? I wand just simple 3D array 10x10x2

Here you are creating a 10x10 array, where each element is a 1x2 matrix. That's what you are asking for, it's not Julia being difficult or obscure, it's just being consistent and straightforward.

scatter( ps[:,:,1], ps[:,:,2], markersize = 2, markerstrokewidth = 0, aspect_ratio=:equal )
# ERROR: BoundsError: attempt to access 10×10 Array{Array{Float64,2},2} at index [Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(10)), Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(10)), 2]

You have a 2D array, so you cannot index into it with 3 indices.

sh = size(ps)
# (10,10)

ps = reshape( ps, ( sh[1]*sh[2],2) )
# ERROR: DimensionMismatch("new dimensions (100, 2) must be consistent with  array size 100")
# Oh dear :(

You have a 10x10 array and try to reshape it into a 100x2 array. The new array would have 200 elements, which is twice as much as the original, so this cannot work.

ps = reshape( ps, ( sh[1]*sh[2],:) )
# 100×1 Array{Array{Float64,2},2}

Here you reshape it into a 100x1 array, that's fine.

xs = ps[:,1]
# 100-element Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
# ??? WTF? ... this arrays looks like whole 'ps' 

And now you are asking for the first (and only) column of the new, reshaped ps. So, naturally, you get all the data. Notice that xs is now a 1D array, not a 100x1 2D array.

ys = ps[:,2] 
# ERROR: BoundsError: attempt to access 100×1 Array{Array{Float64,2},2} at index [Base.Slice(Base.OneTo(100)), 2]

You are asking for the second column of a 100x1 array.

xs = ps[:][1]
# 1×2 Array{Float64,2}: 
#  0.1  0.1
#  But I want all xs  (ps[:,1]), not (ps[1,:]) 

ps[:] turns ps into 1D vector with 100 elements, and then you ask for the first element of that. Seems to me to be expected behaviour.

# Let's try some broadcasting
xs = ps.[1]
# ERROR: syntax: invalid syntax "ps.[1]"

Yes, this doesn't work, and it's not unreasonable to expect that it might, but this is a possible future feature. Perhaps you are looking for first.(ps), which reads the first element from each element of ps. Similarly, last.(ps) reads the last element from each element of ps.

xs = .ps[1]
# ERROR: syntax: invalid identifier name "."

This is not valid syntax. The dot syntax only works on functions and operators.

# Perhaps transpose will help?
ps_ = ps'   #' stackoverflow syntax highlighting for Julia is broken ?
# 1×100 LinearAlgebra.Adjoint{LinearAlgebra.Adjoint{Float64,Array{Float64,2}},Array{Array{Float64,2},2}}:
# OMG! ... That is even worse

Not sure what you want to happen here. Transpose returns a lazy datatype for performance reasons. It's pretty neat.

scatter( ps[:,1], ps[:,2], markersize = 2, markerstrokewidth = 0, aspect_ratio=:equal )
# Nope

As far as I recall, you have changed ps into a 100x1 array, so ps[:,2] cannot work.

Multi-dimensional Arrays · The Julia Language, Type conversions (numerical) We have used conversion in previous examples. the signed Int8. Understanding arrays, matrices, and multidimensional arrays An array is an In most of the other languages, the indexing of arrays starts with 0. StridedArray{T, N} An N dimensional strided array with elements of type T.These arrays follow the strided array interface.If A is a StridedArray, then its elements are stored in memory with offsets, which may vary between dimensions but are constant within a dimension.


Learning Julia: Build high-performance applications for scientific , julia> v = Vector{Float64}[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]] 3-element Array{Array{Float64 convert(::Type{Array{T,2}}, v::Array{Array{T,1},1}) = hcat(v. Could the 2D array be the standard output for 1D array IC input? because the other way around is consistent with the distinction between array and scalar every else. convert will only convert between types that represent the same basic kind of thing (e.g. different representations of numbers, or different string encodings). It is also usually lossless; converting a value to a different type and back again should result in the exact same value.


Change output from Array{Array{Float64,1},1} to Array , Arrays in Julia are a collection of elements just like other collections like Sets, Julia automatically decides the data type of the array by analyzing the values A 2D array can be created by removing the commas between the elements from a to convert the given tuple I to a tuple of indices for use in indexing into array A. It's often indicated with square brackets and comma-separated items. You can create arrays that are full or empty, and arrays that hold values of different types or restricted to values of a specific type. In Julia, arrays are used for lists, vectors, tables, and matrices. A one-dimensional array acts as a vector or list. A 2-D array can be


Arrays in Julia, then all of the following create a new array where the element type is Float64 : A two-dimensional array like img can be indexed as img[2,1] , which would be the To indicate that this is worthy of graphical display, convert the element type to a primary differences between Julia's approach to images and that of several  Sparse Arrays. Julia has support for sparse vectors and sparse matrices in the SparseArrays stdlib module. Sparse arrays are arrays that contain enough zeros that storing them in a special data structure leads to savings in space and execution time, compared to dense arrays.