How can I set a minimum password length when using the built-in Django auth module?

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I’m implementing authentication in a Django site using the built-in auth module, including the built-in UserCreationForm.

I’d like to set a minimum length for passwords. However, I can’t find any documentation on how to do this.

Can I configure the auth module’s User module to require this at the database level? Or should I sub-class the UserCreationForm (I’m actually doing this already for unrelated reasons) and add an extra validator that enforces the password length?

Especially if you're already using a sub-classed UserCreationForm, I'd say you should definitely just add the validation to it. You should be able to override the clean_password method on the form:

def clean_password(self):
    password = self.cleaned_data.get('password1')
    if len(password) < 8:
        raise ValidationError('Password too short')
    return super(MyUserCreationForm, self).clean_password1()

Password management in Django | Django documentation, Can I configure the auth module's User module to require this at the database level? I think the easiest way to achieve this is using Django password validation. For minimum length would be enough adding this to settings file: /​django/contrib/auth/password_validation.py Contains class MinimumLengthValidator with  Django Change Password & Reset Forgot Password Using Built-in Functions. 7th July 2019 Huzaif Sayyed. In this short tutorial, I will explain how to use Change Password and Reset or Forgot Password Functionality in Django. The process for Password Reset involves sending emails. For that matter, we are going to use console email backend and check

I think the easiest way to achieve this is using Django password validation

For minimum length would be enough adding this to settings file:

AUTH_PASSWORD_VALIDATORS = [
    {
        'NAME': 'django.contrib.auth.password_validation.MinimumLengthValidator',
        'OPTIONS': {
            'min_length': 8,
        }
    },
]

There are others validators like NumericPasswordValidator and CommonPasswordValidator

How to set the minimum password length when using the built-in , How to set the minimum password length when using the built-in Django authorization module? Im implements authentication on the Django site using t And Django makes it easy to add your own password validation into the mix when it is creating new users or allowing users to set a new password. How To Enable Password Validation. Django includes some basic validators which can come in handy, such as enforcing a minimum length. There is even one to block any password appearing on a list of the

Subclassing the user creation form sounds like a good approach. You can't enforce it at the database level, since Django only stores a hash of the password.

Django 2 Web Development Cookbook: 100 practical recipes on , 100 practical recipes on building scalable Python web apps with Django 2, 3rd is very similar to the built-in one for minimum length, ensuring that the password is no longer commands, and in built-in forms used to reset or change passwords. also, under the contributed Django auth app's password_validation module. UserAttributeSimilarityValidator, which checks the similarity between the password and a set of attributes of the user. MinimumLengthValidator, which checks whether the password meets a minimum length. This validator is configured with a custom option: it now requires the minimum length to be nine characters, instead of the default eight.

/django/contrib/auth/password_validation.py Contains class MinimumLengthValidator with default the password minimum length:

class MinimumLengthValidator(object):
    """
    Validate whether the password is of a minimum length.
    """
    def __init__(self, min_length=8):
        self.min_length = min_length

    def validate(self, password, user=None):
        if len(password) < self.min_length:
            raise ValidationError(
                ungettext(
                    "This password is too short. It must contain at least %(min_length)d character.",
                    "This password is too short. It must contain at least %(min_length)d characters.",
                    self.min_length
                ),
                code='password_too_short',
                params={'min_length': self.min_length},
            )

    def get_help_text(self):
        return ungettext(
            "Your password must contain at least %(min_length)d character.",
            "Your password must contain at least %(min_length)d characters.",
            self.min_length
        ) % {'min_length': self.min_length}

Customizing authentication in Django, The best way to deal with this is to create a Django User object for each There's no need to set a password # because only the password authentication requirements for which Django's built-in User model is not for example, and you cache the result of get_user_model() in a module-level variable,  UserAttributeSimilarityValidator, which checks the similarity between the password and a set of attributes of the user. MinimumLengthValidator, which simply checks whether the password meets a minimum length. This validator is configured with a custom option: it now requires the minimum length to be nine characters, instead of the default eight.

Some info about answers,

django.contrib.auth.password_validation.MinimumLengthValidator

was newly implemented from django 1.9+ for older version it wont work,

so you can go with your own custom validator,

from django.core.exceptions import ValidationError
from django.utils.translation import ugettext

def validate(min_length, password):
    special_characters = "[~\!@#\$%\^&\*\(\)_\+{}\":;'\[\]]"
    if len(password) < 8:
        raise ValidationError(ugettext('Password length must be greater than 8 character.'))
    if not any(char.isdigit() for char in password):
        raise ValidationError(ugettext('Password must contain at least %(min_length)d digit.') % {'min_length': min_length})
    if not any(char.isalpha() for char in password):
        raise ValidationError(ugettext('Password must contain at least %(min_length)d letter.') % {'min_length': min_length})
    if not any(char in special_characters for char in password):
        raise ValidationError(ugettext('Password must contain at least %(min_length)d special character.') % {'min_length': min_length})

django/password_validation.py at master · django/django · GitHub, django/django/contrib/auth/password_validation.py. Find file Copy path. Fetching Validate whether the password is of a minimum length. """ def __init__(self,  Here is an overview of the common locations where you can find the PAM configuration files and specifically the setting related to the minimum password length. Arch Linux: /etc/pam.d/system-auth with pam_pwquality, or per service. CentOS 7: Using /etc/pam.d/system-auth (symlink) and /etc/pam.d/password-auth (symink) with pam_pwquality

Django Highlights: User Models And Authentication (Part 1 , Django provides a powerful out-of-the-box user model, and in this article, we'll walk streamlines the process of creating a dynamic site with its built-in components. If you'd like to create your own Django application to experiment with the By default, Django only requires a username and password but  Using the Django authentication system¶. This document explains the usage of Django’s authentication system in its default configuration. This configuration has evolved to serve the most common project needs, handling a reasonably wide range of tasks, and has a careful implementation of passwords and permissions.

Chapter 11: User Authentication in Django · Mastering Django: Core , Overview; Using the Django authentication system; User objects Extending Django's default User; Custom users and the built-in auth forms; Custom users It prompts you to change the password of a given user which you must enter twice. Django expects your custom User model to meet some minimum requirements. The max_length should be sufficient for many use cases. If you need a longer length, please use a custom user model. If you use MySQL with the utf8mb4 encoding (recommended for proper Unicode support), specify at most max_length=191 because MySQL can only create unique indexes with 191 characters in that case by default. first_name¶

Django Password Field, So I'm using django-allauth, even though I've found a previous post pointing In new applications the length could be used to create the correct database schema​. This is a built-in module and designed to perform admin related tasks to the user May 4th, 2016 - Software(1 min) The other day I've been confronted with a​  In this case, you can use a “wrapped” password hasher. For this example, we’ll migrate a collection of SHA1 hashes to use PBKDF2(SHA1(password)) and add the corresponding password hasher for checking if a user entered the correct password on login. We assume we’re using the built-in User model and that our project has an accounts app

Comments
  • 2 questions: 1) Why use super() here? Why not return password? 2) I'm getting a AttributeError: 'super' object has no attribute 'clean_password'. What might cause that?
  • It should be clean_password1 not clean_password (and self.cleaned_data.get('password1')) since UserCreationForm has a password1 and password2 for confirmation.
  • There is a better way. See other answer: stackoverflow.com/a/39714008/3708462
  • What is the default minimum length if AUTH_PASSWORD_VALIDATORS not used? How can I check, is there a method?
  • This is the better answer! Don't fiddle with clean methods if there is a password_validation mechanism built-in!
  • Works perfectly with Django 2+ and Wagtail 2+
  • this should be the accepted answer, thank you!