How to have input data ready for apps on K8S

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How to have the input data ready before I deploy a POD on K8S? As I understand, persistent volume is dynamically created using PVC (persistent volume claim), so in a POD yaml file, we can set the PVC and mount path like this:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
  name: mypod
spec:
  containers:
    - name: myfrontend
      image: nginx
      volumeMounts:
      - mountPath: "/var/www/html"
        name: mypd
  volumes:
    - name: mypd
      persistentVolumeClaim:
        claimName: myclaim

The problem is, how can I upload the data before I deploy a POD? What I want is to have the data ready and persistent somewhere on K8S, and then when I deploy the POD, and expose it as service, the service can immediately access the data.


Mount it on another pod somewhere that does the pre-load. Alternatively you could do some fancy stuff with an initContainer.

Inject Data Into Applications, Specify configuration and other data for the Pods that run your workload. Exposing an app to the internet automatically using a single IP. A publicly exposed app is an app with a public IP and port, open for inbound (and outbound) traffic. Exposing a service to the internet using a LoadBalancer type, provisions a new public IP, and assigns it to the service. If you have just a few services, this is the right course


According to your description, you need is a persistent volume. An example of this would be a NFS persistence for which you would define the following yaml.

---
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolume
metadata:
  name: $PV_NAME
  namespace: $NAMESPACE
spec:
  storageClassName: manual
  capacity:
    storage: 1Gi
  accessModes:
  - ReadWriteOnce
  nfs:
    path: /nfs
    server: $SERVER_ADDRESS # 10.128.15.222 for instance
  persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy: Retain

---
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolumeClaim
metadata:
  name: $PVC_NAME
  creationTimestamp: null
  labels:
    app: $PVC_NAME
  namespace: $NAMESPACE
spec:
  storageClassName: manual
  accessModes:
  - ReadWriteOnce
  resources:
    requests:
      storage: 1Gi

After creating a PV and PVC, you would mount it in a deployment like this.

---
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: $POD_NAME
  labels:
    app: $POD_NAME
  namespace: $NAMESPACE
spec:
  replicas: 1
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: $POD_NAME
  template:
    metadata:
      creationTimestamp: null
      labels:
        app: $POD_NAME
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: $POD_NAME
        image: $DOCKER_IMAGE
        volumeMounts:
          - mountPath: /testing-path
            name: $VOLUME_NAME
      volumes:
      - name: $VOLUME_NAME
        persistentVolumeClaim:
          claimName: $PVC_NAME

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Thank you Guys, so following coderanger and Rodrigo Loza's suggestions, I was able to create a NAS file system and mount it onto multiple PODs. One POD can be used to pre-load the data. Other POD then can access it when data is ready. I'm from HPC background, knowing clearly where is storage is my hobby.

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