Find a word before one of two possible separators

python split more delimiters
python split string on multiple delimiters without regex
python split on multiple delimiters
python split around multiple delimiters
split string with two conditions python
delimiters in python
python split consecutive delimiters
split by two strings python
word:12335
anotherword:2323434
totallydifferentword/455
word/32

I need to grab the character string before the : or / using only base R functions. I can do this using stringr but don't want to add another dependency to my package. The words can have variable number of character but would always end at (one of) the separator(s). I don't need to keep what comes after.


Maybe try:

x <- c("word:12335", "anotherword:2323434", "totallydifferentword/455", "word/32")
lapply(strsplit(x, ":|/"), function(z) z[[1]]) #as a list
sapply(strsplit(x, ":|/"), function(z) z[[1]]) #as a string

There are regex solutions with gsub that will work too but in my experiences with similar problems strsplit will be less eloquent but faster.

I supose this regex would work as well:

gsub("([a-z]+)([/|:])([0-9]+)", "\\1", x)

In this case gsub was faster:

Unit: microseconds
        expr    min     lq median     uq     max
1     GSUB() 19.127 21.460 22.392 23.792 106.362
2 STRSPLIT() 46.650 50.849 53.182 54.581 854.162

Natural Language Understanding in a Semantic Web Context, 5.6.2, when we discussed performing word frequency analysis as to get insight into Understanding book without introducing tokenization, since it is one important process that All separators are only possible separators, not definite ones. In earlier versions you could use Find: ^p with hidden text (as long as hidden text is displayed). I think this somehow got broken after Word 2007 SP-2. You can use a macro: Private Sub cmdDeleteAll_Click() Dim oRng As Word.Range Set oRng = ActiveDocument.Range ActiveWindow.View.ShowHiddenText = True With oRng.Find .Text = Chr(13) While .Execute


Something like this would do the trick in Ruby http://rubular.com/r/PzVQVIpKPq

^(\w+)(?:[:\/])

Starting from the front of the string, grab any word characters and capture them, until you reach the non-capturing / or :

Ivor Horton's Beginning Java 2, It does this in a single step, returning all the tokens from a string as an array of Just keep the split() method in mind when you get to Chapter 15. Here I will talk only about patterns that are simply a set of possible delimiter characters in the string. ways of defining a pattern, but I will defer discussing that until Chapter 15. Customizing and Troubleshooting Footnote and Endnote Separators. If your documents contain footnotes or endnotes, you will have run into the concept of separators, which are the short (or long) lines Word inserts between your body text and the footnotes at the bottom of the page or the endnotes at the end of the document or section.


This regex seems to work. Can you use that in R?

Rural New Yorker, There is no possible opportunity for it to get out of balance. they are now, how to make more money than ever before out of your cows. written by two of the best known No one can tell when these splotches of lead may fly off. Your simple word that you would like to see this cream separator on your farm, in your dairy or​  integer vector giving position of first word to extract. Defaults to first word. If negative, counts backwards from last character. end: integer vector giving position of last word to extract. Defaults to first word. If negative, counts backwards from last character. sep: separator between words. Defaults to single space.


Practical Farmer, Cream Separator Offer The Melotte – the wonderful Melotte—the Great Belgian Every possible concession is made to American farmers on this remarkable how many of these Belgian separators we can get, Two shipments have arrived. than ever before. est and most improved in design, construction and operation. What excel vba code could invert the position of two words in a cell if they are separated by a space, like this: "Broom eletric" to "Eletric broom" And not to separate words when they are separated by "," like this: "Broom, eletric" '(this one remains as it is) And if there are lots of words in a cell, it will apply the rules to them all, like


Hoard's Dairyman, Every possible concession is made to American farmers on this remark- 2. able We do not know how many of these Belgian separators we can get, Two lower than ever before, For the first time in the history of cream separator selling in to you which gives you the one opportunity, you have been waiting for to get the  So many answers, yet I can't find any solution that does efficiently what the title of the questions literally asks for (splitting on multiple possible separators—instead, many answers split on anything that is not a word, which is different).


The Fruit Grower and Farmer, Every possible concession is made to American farmers on this remark- 2. We do not know how many of these Belgian separators we can get, Two The tariff Imported direct from Belgium - - r 1 - - and patent arrangements have kept it off the and spins of all Europe—at a price $15.25 lower than ever before, like a top​. Note: With the above two methods, only one thousand separator can be inserted at a time. If you want to insert several thousand separators to a long number at once, please try the following method. If you want to insert several thousand separators to a long number at once, please try the following method.


On Perl: Perl for Students and Professionals, The distance between the two occurrences in fifteen words. Perl performs maximal match and consumes as much as possible for the multiplier. By changing the value of the input record separator, Perl can be made to read several lines at a time. 4.9.1. Reading. A. Paragraph. At. A. Time. Before we get into assigning  Method 2: Find out the position of the 1 st digit in a string. An alternative solution would be using the following formula to determine the position of the first digit in the string: =MIN(SEARCH({0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9},A2&"0123456789")) The detailed explanation of the formula's logic can be found here.