Implementing ceil function without using if-else

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I just wanted to know that is there a way of implementing ceil function without using if-else? With if-else (for a/b) it can be implemented as:

if a%b == 0:
    return(a/b)
else:
    return(a//b + 1)

Like this should work if they are integers (I guess you have a rational number representation):

a/b + (a%b!=0)

Otherwise, replace a/b with int(a/b), or, better, as suggested below a//b.

Find ceil of a/b without using ceil() function, 0) is a checking condition which returns 1 if we have any remainder left after the division of a/b, else it returns 0. The integer division value is added with the  Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. Learn more Implementing ceil function without using if-else

Simplest would be.

a//b + bool(a%b)

And just for safety,

b and (a//b + bool(a%b))

Cheers.

Ceil and Floor functions in C++, in C++ with ordering by first and second element · Implementing upper_bound​() and In mathematics and computer science, the floor and ceiling functions map a Returns the largest integer smaller // than or equal to x double floor(​double x) If you like GeeksforGeeks and would like to contribute, you can also write an  The ceil() function takes a single argument whose ceiling value is computed. ceil() Return value The ceil() function returns the smallest possible integer value which is greater than or equal to the given argument.

-(-a//b)

Perhaps the simplest?

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*Edited per @Gilles's comment:

for an integer n,

floor(x)=n for x in [n, n+1)
ceil(y)=n+1 for y in (n, n+1]

So, floor(-y)=-n-1 for -y in [-n-1, -n),

and ceil(y)=-floor(-y)=n+1 for y in (n, n+1]

In Python, floor(a/b) = a//b. Thus ceil(a/b) = -(-a//b)

C Language: ceil function (Ceiling), In the C Programming Language, the ceil function returns the smallest integer This website would not exist without the advertisements we display and your kind donations. If you are unable to support us by viewing our advertisements, please #define · #undef · #if · #ifdef · #ifndef · #elif · #else · #endif · #warning · #error  @Time: You can use the frexp() function to extract M and E. You can then use E to identify how many digits in M are above the binary point, and how many are below. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 4 '11 at 18:15

ceil function in C++, Here we discuss the introduction and appropriate examples of ceil function in C++ limits of a function or value which can be easily done by applying this function. are many functions that are present which makes many problem statements to 21 by using the ceil function and is reduced to 20 if the floor function is used. C Language: ceil function (Ceiling) In the C Programming Language, the ceil function returns the smallest integer that is greater than or equal to x (ie: rounds up the nearest integer).

C - ceil() function, ceil( ) function in C returns nearest integer value which is greater than or equal If decimal value is from “.1 to .5”, it returns integer value less than the argument. Ceil and Floor functions in C++ In mathematics and computer science, the floor and ceiling functions map a real number to the greatest preceding or the least succeeding integer, respectively. floor(x) : Returns the largest integer that is smaller than or equal to x (i.e : rounds downs the nearest integer).

Ceil function: how can we implement it ourselves?, floor function implementation c If yes, return num+1 else return num. Find ceil of a/b without using ceil() function, Using simple maths, we can add the  C library function - ceil() - The C library function double ceil(double x) returns the smallest integer value greater than or equal to x.

Comments
  • from math import ceil?
  • @Blender: I want to do it without using the inbuilt ceil function.
  • a // b would be better than int(a / b).
  • Only if by "simple" you mean concise but hardly understandable ...