How to get ord (unicode) of each character in string?

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I'm trying to get a function to take a string and print each character in the string in unicode separated by a space. This is all I was able to get:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    for ch in s:
        return ord(ch)

This gives me the output:

Expected:
    '97 98 99 '
Got:
    97

Expected:
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
Got:
    97

I can't figure out how to get each one? I thought of using str.split() but I didn't think that would work properly.

I would appreciate any help.

return exits the function, so you should create a list and keep appending to it:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    l = []
    for ch in s:
        l.append(str(ord(ch)))
    return ' '.join(l)

Even better:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    return ' '.join([str(ord(ch)) for ch in s])

Or without calling, printing, and assuming python 3 (just add a from __future__ import print_function at the top of the file in python 2):

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    for ch in s:
        print(ord(ch), end=' ')
    print()

And assuming python 3 again (do the same as above if python 2, from __future__ import print_function at the top of the file):

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    [print(ord(ch), end=' ') for ch in s]

And now in the first two cases:

print(get_ords('abc'))

Output:

97 98 99

And now in the last two cases:

get_ords('abc')

Output:

97 98 99

Unicode HOWTO — Python 3.8.5 documentation, Python's string type uses the Unicode Standard for representing characters, They'll usually look the same, but these are two different characters that have The encoding specifies that each character is represented by a specific ord() function that takes a one-character Unicode string and returns the code point value: >� Method #1 : Using re.sub () + ord () + lambda In this, we perform the task of substitution using re.sub () and lambda function is used to perform the task of conversion of each characters using ord (). Python3

return is only called once in a function.

You can either

  1. Create a local variable that stores all of your output, like so:
def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    ret = []
    for ch in s:  
        ret.append(ord(ch))
    return ' '.join(ret)  # or skip the for loop using a list comprehension here
  1. Use yield to define a generator
def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    yield ord(ch)

x = get_ords(s)

for y in x:
    print(y)

Unicode & Character Encodings in Python: A Painless Guide – Real , Free Bonus: Click here to get access to a chapter from Python Tricks: The Book Each character from the ASCII string gets pseudo-encoded into 8 bits, with Using the Python ord() function gives you the base-10 code point for a single str� Given a string of length one, return an integer representing the Unicode code point of the character when the argument is a unicode object, or the value of the byte when the argument is an 8-bit string. For example, ord(‘a’) returns the integer 97, ord(‘€’) (Euro sign) returns 8364. This is the inverse of chr() for 8-bit strings and of unichr() for unicode objects. If a unicode argument is given and Python was built with UCS2 Unicode, then the character’s code point must be in

Good time to learn comprehensions. They are both shorter to write and often more efficient that iteratively growing an array:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    return ' '.[ord(c) for s in c]

ord - Manual, ord — Convert the first byte of a string to a value between 0 and 255 of any string encoding, and in particular will never identify a Unicode code point in a multi-byte As ord() doesn't work with utf-8, and if you do not have access to mb _* to do with character encoding at all - it is just interpreting a binary byte from a string� Yes, ord("\N{HIRAGANA LETTER KU}") is indeed 12367, aka 0x304F. I would never use numbers for characters the way you do, only named ones the way I do. Magic numbers are bad for your program. Just think of chr and ord as inverse functions of each other. It’s really easy. – tchrist Sep 3 '11 at 4:48

You can simply do this:

def get_ords(s):
    return ' '.join([str(ord(ch)) for ch in s])

ord() function in Python, Given a string of length one, return an integer representing the Unicode code point of the character when the argument is a unicode object,� If you look at the ASCII table, you’ll notice that you can convert a lowercase character into uppercase by subtracting 32 from it. ("a".ord - 32).chr # "A". ("a".ord - 32).chr. # "A". ("a".ord - 32).chr # "A". That also works the other way around. ("A".ord + 32).chr # "a". ("A".ord + 32).chr. # "a".

As already pointed you might use list-comprehension for that. As already noted only one return in every function run is executed, so if you wish to fire return more than once you need to arrange your function in recursive manner that is:

def get_ords(s):
    if len(s)>=2:
        return f"{ord(s[0])} "+get_ords(s[1:])
    else:
        return f"{ord(s[0])}"
print(get_ords('abc')) # 97 98 99
print(get_ords('a b c')) # 97 32 98 32 99

Above code uses so-called f-strings (tutorial) available in Python 3.6 onwards. Naturally this is much less readable than list-comprehension method, however in some use cases recursion is useful.

Unicode — pysheeet, Python 3 takes all string characters as Unicode code point. The lenght of ord is a powerful built-in function to get a Unicode code point from a given character. Word VBA, Get the Unicode Value of Each Character in the Equation Jul 06, 2015 by azurous in Equations In this article I have provided a function that returns the unicode values associated with the characters in an equation.

The charCodeAt () method returns the Unicode of the character at the specified index in a string. The index of the first character is 0, the second character 1, and so on. Tip: You can use the charCodeAt () method together with the length property to return the Unicode of the last character in a string.

ASCII or American Standard Code for Information Interchange is the standard way to represent each character and symbol with a numeric value. This example will show you how to print the ASCII value of a character. ord() function : Python comes with one built-in method ord to find out the Unicode value of a character. The syntax of this method is

The numbers (written U+xxxx) for each abstract character and each combining symbol are called “codepoints.” Every Unicode string is expressed as a list of codepoints. As illustrated above, multiple strings of codepoints may render into the same sequence of graphemes.

Comments
  • Thanks for this. I just haven't learnt about appending and joining as of yet in my class, so wasn't sure of how to do this.
  • @puppyonkik Remember to accept and up-vote if it works :-)
  • Could also print(" ".join(str(ord(ch)) for ch in s))
  • @U9-Forward sorry to be a nuisance, one more thing.. how do I get the output to be wrapped in singular quotations so my doctest passes? my professor is stingy about that. (eg the output is '97 98 99')
  • @puppyonkik check the first two examples, they do it.
  • Alec, little slower than me... :-)