String format printing with python3: How to print from array?

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Python3 has the super string.format printing:

'{} {}'.format('one', 'two')

If my strings are in an array, one way would be to type them out:

a = ['one','two']
'{} {}'.format(a[0],a[1])

But how can I print from an array, instead of having to type out each element?

For example, broken code:

a = ['one','two']
'{} {}'.format(a)

Gives me an expected error: IndexError: tuple index out of range

Of course, playing with ','.join(a) won't help, because it gives one string rather than 2.

(Or is there a way to do this better with f-strings?)


And for full-disclosure, I'm using a raw-string because it has some geometrical significance, and my real code looks like this:

hex_string = r'''
            _____
           /     \
          /       \
    ,----(    {}    )----.
   /      \       /      \
  /   {}    \_____/   {}    \
  \        /     \        /
   \      /       \      /
    )----(    {}    )----(
   /      \       /      \
  /        \_____/        \
  \   {}    /     \   {}    /
   \      /       \      /
    `----(    {}    )----'
          \       /
           \_____/
'''

letters = list('1234567')

print(hex_string.format(letters[0], letters[1], letters[2], letters[3], letters[4], letters[5], letters[6]))

Use unpacking to expand the array during the function call.

print(hex_string.format(*letters))

Output:

            _____
           /     \
          /       \
    ,----(    1    )----.
   /      \       /      \
  /   2    \_____/   3    \
  \        /     \        /
   \      /       \      /
    )----(    4    )----(
   /      \       /      \
  /        \_____/        \
  \   5    /     \   6    /
   \      /       \      /
    `----(    7    )----'
          \       /
           \_____/

String format printing with python3: print from unpacked array *some , You can try something like this with .format() : a = '123' print('{2}, {0}, {1}'.format(*a )). which would print 3, 1, 2. With this approach, your initial� Ways to print NumPy Array in Python. As mentioned earlier, we can also implement arrays in Python using the NumPy module. The module comes with a pre-defined array class that can hold values of same type. These NumPy arrays can also be multi-dimensional. So, let us see how can we print both 1D as well as 2D NumPy arrays in Python. Using print

Try unpacking the elements of the list using * as following. For example, printing would look like

print ('{} {}'.format(*a))
# one two

Python Tutorial: Formatted Output, formatted output in three ways: the string methods ljust, rjust, center, format or using a C-style like formatting. Lists of String Array in Python. Below are the lists of a String array in Python: 1. List. When there is a need for order and also there is a requirement of frequent change, then we prefer selecting the list. Another feature of the list is it allows duplicates. Here is a simple example of a list. Code:

Use the * notation for lists:

print(hex_string.format(*letters))

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The result: Employee Name is Mike. The paid amount are: [4000, 4000, 4500, 4500, 5000] Second way: Using string string.format method. The second and more usable way of formatting strings in Python is the str.format function which is part of the string class.

I want to print a list in python without the square brackets. It is always coming printing like [“a”,”b”,”c”] Announcement! Career Guide 2019 is out now. Explore careers to become an AI/ ML Engineer or Data Scientist!

Formatting output using format method : The format() method was added in Python(2.6). Format method of strings requires more manual effort. User use {} to mark where a variable will be substituted and can provide detailed formatting directives, but user also needs to provide the information to be formatted. This method lets us concatenate

Comments
  • if anyone is curious, it's for an open source python port of the New York Times' puzzle game "Spelling Bee": github.com/philshem/open-spelling-bee
  • I'm not sure any of the usual string formatting schemes will help here since you need the output of each formatted item to leave the surrounding data untouched.
  • @quamrana yes, I had to add one space character each time I used {} because the brackets are replaced by one character
  • Your example above uses 'one' and 'two'. What about when 'three' turns up?
  • yes, and actually, my question isn't specific enough, because I always want letters[0] in the center hexagon, which is the 4th {}