box shadows on multiple elements at same level but without overlap?

I want to create something like the following screenshot, but I can't figure out any z-index value for which the shadow doesn't appear either over the first or second box (they are always stacked either with the first one on top, or the second).

Is there a way to achieve the following?

body { background: darkgrey; padding-top: 50px}
div { background: white; width: 200px; height: 200px; box-shadow: 0 0 20px 
black; margin: auto; position: relative; }
#box-one { left: -50px; z-index: 1; }
#box-two { right: -50px; z-index: 1; }

https://codepen.io/eoghanmurray/pen/oVEEVK


If you can use filter and drop-shadow then you can apply a drop-shadow to the container. This shadow differs as it conforms to the alpha channel of the image (in this case, the outline of the content) instead of a simple rectangle:

body {
  background: darkgrey;
  padding-top: 50px
}

#box-one,
#box-two {
  background: white;
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  margin: auto;
  position: relative;
}

#box-one {
  left: -50px;
  z-index: 1;
}

#box-two {
  right: -50px;
  z-index: 1;
}

#top {
  filter: drop-shadow(0 0 20px black);
}
<div id="top">
  <div id="box-one"></div>
  <div id="box-two"></div>
</div>

CSS shadows under adjacent elements, 问题: I want to create something like the following screenshot, but I can't figure out any z-index value for which the shadow doesn't appear� 9.9.1 Specifying the stack level: the 'z-index' property. z-index: Applies to: positioned elements. Each box has a position in three dimensions. In addition to their horizontal and vertical positions, boxes lie along a "z-axis" and are formatted one on top of the other. Z-axis positions are particularly relevant when boxes overlap visually.


You can consider drop-shadow filter on a parent element:

body {
  background: pink;
}

.b1,
.b2 {
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  background: #fff;
}

.b2 {
  margin-left: 100px;
}
.container {
  filter:drop-shadow(0 0 10px #000);
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="b1"></div>
  <div class="b2"></div>
</div>

box-shadow, box shadows on multiple elements at same level but without overlap? 50px} div { background: white; width: 200px; height: 200px; box-shadow: 0 0 20px black ;� Multiple Borders & More. You can comma separate box-shadow any many times as you like. For instance, this shows two shadows with different positions and different colors on the same element: box-shadow: inset 5px 5px 10px #000000, inset -5px -5px 10px blue; The example shows how you can use that to create multiple borders:


I create a new div and set some css for it.

body { background: darkgrey; padding-top: 50px}
div { background: white;  width: 200px; height: 200px; box-shadow: 0 0 20px black; margin: auto; position: relative; }
#box-one { left: -50px; }
#box-two { right: -50px;  }
#div1{
  position:absolute;
  background: white;
  width:100px;
  height:15px;
  margin-right:10px;
  box-shadow: none;
  margin-top:185px;
  margin-left:199px;
  content: '';
  z-index: 1
 

}
<div id="div1"></div>
<div id="box-one"></div>
<div id="box-two"></div>

box-shadow, I want to create something like the following screenshot, but I can't figure out any z-index value for which the shadow doesn't appear either over the first or� → Here the Line 10 defines Css Box Shadow Property for IE9 and for Opera 7+. → Line 18 defines Css Box Shadow Property for Mozilla Firefox. → And Line 27 defines Css Box Shadow Property for Webkit Browsers like Safari and Google Chrome. (The rest of the Multiple shadow values are same for all.) Inner Shadows (Example 1)


A cleaner solution is to add the box-shadow to a pseudo-element like ::before or ::after and then add position:relative to a parent element.

#box-one
{
  left: -50px;
}

#box-two
{
  right: -50px;
}

body
{
  background: darkgrey;
  padding-top: 50px;
}

.box-container
{
    position: relative;
    z-index: 2;
}

.box
{
  background: white;
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  margin: auto;
  position: relative;
}

.box::after
{
  content: "";
  box-shadow: 0 0 20px black;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  z-index: -1;
}
<div class="box-container">
  <div id="box-one" class="box"></div>
  <div id="box-two" class="box"></div>
</div>

Stacked "Borders", The :before pseudoelement is a box that has the same size as the original element, but thanks to the lower z-index, it is rendered below other� The box-shadow property allows elements to have multiple and unlimited numbers of shadows, which are divided by a comma-separated list. The syntax for the CSS3 box-shadow is written in the form


Multiple Shadows in CSS, The z-ordering of multiple box shadows is the same as multiple box-shadow to ensure the shadow doesn't overlap adjacent elements� Mikkel, you might also try adding multiple shadows with the same color so that the top and both sides are shadowed but the bottom is not. Like this:.shadow{box-shadow:5px -5px 5px #ccc, -5px -5px 5px #ccc;} Of course, you can get more sophisticated with multiple shadows to achieve just the effect your after, but this gives you the idea.


Detailed Positioning, When multiple box shadows are applied to an element, Shadows do not influence layout and may overlap other boxes or their shadows. Depending on the module you are using, you may have to add some custom background colors, padding, box radius, etc. to get it looking right. You can also add a box shadow to create depth when overlapping modules. Method 2: Overlapping Modules with Rows. You may be asking why you would need to overlap a row with a module.


So if we give a box shadow no offset, no blur, and a bit of spread, it will draw itself all around the element, looking like a solid border� Box Color. color. Opacity. Outline Inset. knob. Copy Text. CSSmatic is a non-profit project, made by developers for developers. Are you a web developer? Would you