Use findstr regular expressions to search for patterns in piped results

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I want to search for the pattern (COM\d+) in the output of mode command. I have tried the:

mode | findstr /R (COM\d+)

But it doesn't return anything. I would appreciate if you could help me know what is the correct way to do this.

P.S.1 Thanks to the comments I now have the mode | findstr /RC:"COM[0-9*]" which yields the line with the given match. Now I need to find a way to print out just the match. maybe using the for /f ... in to loop the string?

P.S.2 I'm being told that mode | findstr /RC:"COM[123456789][0123456789]*" is a safer option.

Here's two simple examples according to my comments:

From the Command Prompt, to satisfy your cmd tag:

(For /F Delims^=: %A In ('Mode^|FindStr "COM[0-9]*:"')Do @For %B In (%A)Do @Set "var=%B")&Call Echo(%var%

From a batch file, to satisfy your batch-file tag:

@(For /F Delims^=: %%A In ('Mode^|FindStr "COM[0-9]*:"')Do @For %%B In (%%A)Do @Set "var=%%B")&Call Echo(%%var%%&Pause

To supplement my comment about WMI, you could alternatively try:

From the Command Prompt:

For /F Skip^=1Delims^= %A In ('WMIC Path Win32_SerialPort Get DeviceID 2^>Nul')Do @For %B In (%A)Do @Echo(%B

From a batch file:

@For /F Skip^=1Delims^= %%A In ('WMIC Path Win32_SerialPort Get DeviceID 2^>Nul')Do @For %%B In (%%A)Do @Echo(%%B&Pause

Findstr - Search for strings - Windows CMD, FINDSTR. Search for a text string in a file (or multiple files) unlike the simple FIND command /B Match pattern if at the Beginning of a line. If more than one file is searched (/F), the results will be prefixed with the filename To match an entire phrase/sentence or to use Regular Expressions use the /C and /R options. Regular expressions use both literal characters and meta-characters to find patterns of text, rather than exact strings of characters. A literal character is a character that doesn't have a special meaning in the regular-expression syntax; instead, it matches an occurrence of that character. For example, letters and numbers are literal characters.

How to use FINDSTR regular expressions (regex) to search for , How to use FINDSTR regular expressions (regex) to search for patterns in piped results? Tl;dr: I want to search for the pattern (COM\d+) in the output of mode� findstr /C:"Apple Ball Cat" Book.txt Search with Regular Expressions. You can use regular expressions with findstr /R switch. Typical command would be as below. findstr /R pattern filename.txt. Here the pattern can be specified using regular expressions. Examples: Search for the occurrence of all words ending with ‘xyz’ in a file.

It sounds like you just want "COM1" or "COM3" as the output. If so, this'll do it:

for /f "tokens=4 delims=: " %A in ('mode ^| findstr /i /r "COM[0-9]*:"') do @echo %A

It'll produce the following output:

COM1

Use findstr on Windows to find text in files and command outputs , So, why not just use only one for loop command and addind \ for literal find COM +RegEx in FindStr by this: "\C\O\M[0-9*]." Obs.: For some reason, the command� Regular Expressions (Search for patterns of text) FINDSTR with the /R option can use the following metacharacters which have special meaning either as an operator or delimiter. FINDSTR support for regular expressions is limited and non-standard, only the following metacharacters are supported:

Findstr - Search for strings, You can use the application to filter command line outputs, search /R -- use search strings as regular expressions; /B -- matches patterns at the returns any result that matches the string (in this case the IP address). findstr� Support for regex in findstr is quite limited. I suggest using Notepad++. The find in files option supports Perl Compatible Regular Expressions; results showing filename, line number and matching text can be easily copied to a text file.

If more than one file is searched, the results will be prefixed with the filename where the text was found. Regular Expressions (Search for patterns of text). FINDSTR can use the following metacharacters which have special meaning either as an FINDSTR does not support alternation with the pipe character (|) multiple� Findstr is a powerful command that you may use to search for strings in files or to filter command line output. You may use it to scan entire directory structures or drives for files that match the selected string or part of it, and to find specified text in command line outputs quickly.

Regular Expressions (Search for patterns of text) FINDSTR with the / R option can use the following metacharacters which have special meaning either as an operator or delimiter . FINDSTR support for regular expressions is limited and non - standard , only the following metacharacters are supported :

Comments
  • findstr /? at a command prompt documents the available options, including a quick reference for regexes.
  • This type of regex is not supported in batch. What you have to try is mode | findstr /RC:"COM[0-9*]" which should work
  • This is the type of regex findstr supports and it isn't possible to echo exact match
  • Findstr does not use \d, which is why I referred you to its regex documentation. Read my comment again. :-)
  • @double-beep, you've got a type, the asterisk must be outside of the brackets, so it's [0-9]* to match zero or more decimal digits, or [0-9][0-9]* to match one or more such; note that this character class [0-9] might actually also match characters like ², ³, depending on the current code page; to prevent that you'd need [0123456789] instead...
  • All you need to do is to implement a counter, saving each to a separate variable incremented with that counter, or try to be clever and concatenate each result to a single variable. The alternative, depending upon what you're specifically wanting to do is to use WMI.
  • I have edited my answer to include a WMI example! Of course the 'even shorter' version you've shown is still limited by the systems language, mine was extended specifically to prevent that limitation, but if its only for use on known systems of that language that's fine.
  • Do you think that a German, French, Spanish etc. system would see the English words Status for device COM1: from their Mode command?
  • Did you try my WMIC alternatives?
  • Nothing whtsover to do with PowerShell. It is simply a command line interface for Windows Management and Instumentation. It isn't the easiest of commands to work with, but its Query Language can be pretty useful. So in the case of your latest comment you could filter through it using, for instance, something like WMIC Path Win32_SerialPort Where "MaxBaudRate='115200' And ProviderType Like 'RS232%'" Get DeviceID. Take a look at this page for the options you can filter with.
  • Thanks lot. I will look into this.
  • you linked to the same post :)
  • This How to Answer (stackoverflow.com/questions/54717590/…) the link is this one ..
  • The nice part of your question is that this one make me Update my another answerin this platform so, I need say thank to you too.. Thx!
  • @Foad there is not same question, the OP needs is the take the com number too, but not use the RegEx in FindSTR command! Soh, is different one!