A terminal command for a rooted Android to remount /System as read/write

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I'm writing an android app that needs to copy a file to the "/system" partition at runtime. I've got the commands to run "su" and can successfully request SuperUser permissions and run commands as root. But I don't know how to make this app universal across multiple devices, because the mount command can differ depending on where the /system is actually mounted. Here's the command that's used most offen:

mount -o remount,rw -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock3 /system

But I know that mtdblock3 could be different on some devices (and for that matter, i guess so could yaffs2). So, my question is: Is there a universal command that will work on all phones? Or is there a way to find out at runtime what the correct parameters are?

You can run the mount command without parameter in order to get partition information before constructing your mount command. Here is an example of the mount command without parameter outputed from my HTC Hero.

$ mount
mount
rootfs / rootfs ro 0 0
tmpfs /dev tmpfs rw,mode=755 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,mode=600 0 0
proc /proc proc rw 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs rw 0 0
tmpfs /sqlite_stmt_journals tmpfs rw,size=4096k 0 0
none /dev/cpuctl cgroup rw,cpu 0 0
/dev/block/mtdblock3 /system yaffs2 rw 0 0
/dev/block/mtdblock5 /data yaffs2 rw,nosuid,nodev 0 0
/dev/block/mtdblock4 /cache yaffs2 rw,nosuid,nodev 0 0
/dev/block//vold/179:1 /sdcard vfat rw,dirsync,nosuid,nodev,noexec,uid=1000,gid=
1015,fmask=0702,dmask=0702,allow_utime=0020,codepage=cp437,iocharset=iso8859-1,s
hortname=mixed,utf8,errors=remount-ro 0 0

How to mount /system rewritable or read-only? (RW/RO), Method 2: Open terminal on your android phone (download here): Type this in the terminal : su. Choose one: (for security mount /system back to RO when finished) Mount system RW: mount -o rw,remount /system. Mount system RO: mount -o ro,remount /system. Most of Android partitions are mounted as read only. For eg. /system where most of the libs and other system components are stored, including the permissions.xml file. You can temporary re-mount the /system partition to read write and load your new files to that partition! using adb shell or the android terminal with root privileges, do the

I use this command:

mount -o rw,remount /system

How can I remount my Android/system as read-write in a bash script , How can I remount my Android/system as read-write in a bash script using adb? If you have rooted phone then go to terminal and hit the below command to� Not all phones and versions of android have things mounted the same. Limiting options when remounting would be best. Simply remount as rw (Read/Write): # mount -o rw,remount /system Once you are done making changes, remount to ro (read-only): # mount -o ro,remount /system

Try

mount -o remount,rw /system

If no error message is printed, it works.

Or, you should do the following.

First, make sure the fs type.

mount

Issue this command to find it out.

Then

mount -o rw,remount -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock3 /system

Note that the fs(yaffs2) and device(/dev/block/mtdblock3) are depend on your system.

How to: Mount System RW in Android, Root-enabled users can set the System folder to a read/write state, just like a a command line is an advanced technique - novice users should avoid terminal� Be aware that this may only affect the mount status that your shell prompt sees--i.e., changes to Android in version 4.2+ impacted how a remount command would/could be seen by other processes. Notice how the mount state/status changes from "ro" to "rw".

Instead of

mount -o rw,remount /system/

use

mount -o rw,remount /system

mind the '/' at the end of the command. you ask why this matters? /system/ is the directory under /system while /system is the volume name.

How to mount /system rewritable or read-only? (RW/RO), How can I mount the /system directory rewritable or read-only on my Android phone? If you don't want to type the command every time in the terminal, I've written Google Play - Mount /system RO/RW Pro [ROOT] (Pro version without ads)� hello , followed ur instructions , rooted my ideos x5 with superoneclick, and trying now to give command lines through cmd to my device in adb mode in order to mount the system partition but i still cannot give a $ su command , so i cant by result mount any file system as read - write.

You can try adb remount command also to remount /system as read write

adb remount

Android Knowledge Base, A terminal command for a rooted Android to remount /System as read/write. I'm writing an android app that needs to copy a file to the "/system" partition at� Ordinarily, you must remount the /system partition writeable, probably you did in a previous try. Your command strings that you erroneously term "mountRW" & "mountRO" do not accomplish mounting, but instead change the file permissions so the non-root process running your java code can change the file.

Adb push read only file system without root - IMpres, Also, /system is read only, you need root access to remount it in read/write mode. Easily Push how to use adb pull command to copy file from android system to All you need to do is run “adb root” in the Terminal/Command Prompt, which� xda-developers Android Development and Hacking Android General Android Terminal Commands by rezo609 XDA Developers was founded by developers, for developers. It is now a valuable resource for people who want to make the most of their mobile devices, from customizing the look and feel to adding new functionality.

android mount o rw, 2/20/2019 � A terminal command for a rooted Android to remount /System as read /write. Ask Question mount -o remount,rw -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock3� There's no way for you to get read-write permissions to a SquashFS filesystem except if you were to unpack it, change it, then repack it. Re-install Android-x86 to an Ext2/3 filesystem and it will then ask you if you want to install system as read/write. (Also, please check the Discussion group for things like this instead of the issue tracker)

Android Terminal Commands, Here are a few commands for Android in terminal. If you have any We type this to switch to the root user. Mount /system in Read/Write mode: mount -o rw, remount /system Mount /system in Read Only mode: mount -o ro,remount /system . I'm trying to mount an hfsplus filesystem in a Xubuntu 12.04 VM (kernel version 3.2.0-23-generic) but when I type mount -o remount,rw /dev/sdb3 in command line it returns not mounted or bad option. Any help would be appreciated.

Comments
  • None of the solutions work for Marshmallow (maybe even >=5.1.1)
  • works just fine for me under 5.1.1, but I don't have a Marshmallow device to test
  • workaround for pushing files on M: adb push seems to fail if I push directly to /system. What I do: 1. mount /system 2. give permissions 3. push to sdcard something 4. su mv from sd to /system 5. leave permissions as is, and system mounted because we like bad practices!
  • It works with Marshmallow (6.0) using Genymotion. mount -o remount,rw /system
  • related: stackoverflow.com/questions/13089694/…
  • OK, that's great, thanks. One question, though -- from that output, I can find the line that has /system and parse the mount point and partition type. Is there any command that will just output that info for only /system (to avoid all the parsing)?
  • Nevermind -- I got it all parsed without any issues, but there is another problem: I can run other root commands just fine from within my app, but the "mount -o remount,rw -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock3 /system" command has no effect. I get no errors, and it looks like it ran successfully, but /system stays as read-only. Any ideas or suggestions?
  • I think you can not run the "mount -o remount,rw -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock3 /system" command with regular app permission. You should run it with root permission in order to take effect.
  • I'm running it under "su", meaning it has root permissions from the SuperUser app;
  • I recommend you read this thread on how to execute a command with [stackoverflow.com/questions/4594071/…" permission)