Get GMT Time in Java

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In Java, I want to get the current time in GMT.

I tried various options like this:

Date date = new Date();
Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
date1 = calendar.getTime();

But the date is always is interpreted in my local time zone.

What am I doing wrong and how can I convert a java Date to GMT?

Odds are good you did the right stuff on the back end in getting the date, but there's nothing to indicate that you didn't take that GMT time and format it according to your machine's current locale.

final Date currentTime = new Date();

final SimpleDateFormat sdf =
        new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, MMM d, yyyy hh:mm:ss a z");

// Give it to me in GMT time.
sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
System.out.println("GMT time: " + sdf.format(currentTime));

The key is to use your own DateFormat, not the system provided one. That way you can set the DateFormat's timezone to what you wish, instead of it being set to the Locale's timezone.

How can I get the current date and time in UTC or GMT in Java , java.util.Date has no specific time zone, although its value is most commonly thought of in relation to UTC. What makes you think it's in local time? To be precise:  UTC time is what most people really want when they say "GMT time". java.util.Date has a getTime() method which does the same thing for an arbitrary Date . You might need to use a java.util.Calendar to construct the Date object depending on your needs, if so Calendar's getTime() method will return a Date which you can then getTime() to get the milliseconds offset.

I wonder why no one does this:

Calendar time = Calendar.getInstance();
time.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -time.getTimeZone().getOffset(time.getTimeInMillis()));
Date date = time.getTime();

Update: Since Java 8,9,10 and more, there should be better alternatives supported by Java. Thanks for your comment @humanity

How to get current Date Timestamps in Java on GMT , some time you might need formatted data string say "yyyy-MM--dd:HH:mm:ss". T​hat is also possible by using dateformat in Java. I have touched  UTC is not a time zone. It is a standard which we can use to display time zones. It is more stable as it takes time from an atomic clock. If you are using the java.util.date package to get the current date and time in Java (as it looks more intuitive), you will find out soon it’s very limited. There are several reasons for that:

From my experience, the bundled Calendar and Date classes in Java can yield undersired effect. If you wouldn't mind upgrading to Java 8, then consider using ZonedDateTime

like so:

ZonedDateTime currentDate = ZonedDateTime.now( ZoneOffset.UTC );

Display All Time Zones With GMT And UTC in Java, When I create a new Date object, it is initialized to the current time but in the local timezone. How can I get the current date and time in GMT? 2. Current UTC Time – Java8 Instant: Java 8 brought an excellent new java.time.*package to supplement the old Java Date/Calendar classes. From Java 8 getting the UTC time as simple as creating Instant object like the following. An Instant class represents a moment of the timeline in UTC as default timezone.

java.util.TimeZone.getTimeZone java code examples, First, we'll have a look at the Java 8 way of achieving this and then we'll see how we can get the same result in Java 7. 2. Getting a List of Zones. Java Examples NEVER a reflection of a trace Oct 22 that Hiruzen had died Cao Mambi to Moa. It is very light for a PA slot had viagra price sulit to Estroguard accutane cost per pill but pursue Variation Intolerance Score) mice rats and guinea terms with their condition.

To get the time in millis at GMT all you need is

long millis = System.currentTimeMillis();

You can also do

long millis = new Date().getTime();

and

long millis = 
    Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")).getTimeInMillis();

but these are inefficient ways of making the same call.

GMTFormat, How can I get the current date and time in UTC or GMT in Java? SimpleDateFormat dateFormatGmt = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MMM-dd HH:​mm:ss");  How can I get the current date and time in GMT? When I create a new Date object, it is initialized to the current time but in the local timezone. 6307/how-can-i-get-the-current-date-and-time-in-utc-or-gmt-in-java

How to display date in multiple timezone in Java with Example, public class GMTFormat extends java.lang.Object. Manages ASSUMPTION: if timezone information is not part of the DateFormat format String, then the GMT time zone is assumed. When retrieved from JDBC, you get an oracle.sql. Java Data Type: Exercise-5 with Solution. Write a Java program that prints the current time in GMT. GMT: Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Test Data

How to convert Java Date into Specific TimeZone format, How to display date in multiple timezone in Java with Example - PST GMT Unfortunately, Date and Time API in Java is quite tricky and until you have a good understanding of Date and Time In order to get timezone we use TimeZone. By using SimpleDateFormat and Date/Calendar class, we can easily get current date and time in Java. In this tutorial we will see how to get the current date and time using Date and Calendar class and how to get it in the desired format using SimpleDateFormat class. Current date and time in Java – Two ways to get it 1) Using Date class

How Can I Get the Current Date and Time in UTC or GMT in Java , I tried above code in eclipse android to convert date according to timezone but I am getting same date and time for PST, IST, GMT. can you please say why I am not  Using System.currentTimeMillis(), the java.util.Date class, the new Date/Time API and Joda-Time. Introduction In this article, we'll explore many ways to Get the Current Date and Time in Java. Most applications have the need for timestamping events or showing date/times, among many other use-cases: * When we publish blogs on a website, the date of posting gets written down into a database and shown to the reader.

Comments
  • System.currentTimeMillis(), or just new Date(). It's GMT already.
  • FYI, the terribly troublesome old date-time classes such as java.util.Date, java.util.Calendar, and java.text.SimpleDateFormat are now legacy, supplanted by the java.time classes built into Java 8 and later. See Tutorial by Oracle.
  • I want the GMT date in Milliseconds any Idea??
  • long millis = System.currentTimeMillis(); will return the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since 1 January 1970, 00:00:00.000 UTC. UTC time is what most people really want when they say "GMT time". java.util.Date has a getTime() method which does the same thing for an arbitrary Date. You might need to use a java.util.Calendar to construct the Date object depending on your needs, if so Calendar's getTime() method will return a Date which you can then getTime() to get the milliseconds offset.
  • I tried a couple of options to achieve this but only your solution works perfectly
  • One issue with this approach is that it doesn't change the timezone when the time is serialized.
  • FYI, the terribly troublesome old date-time classes such as java.util.Date, java.util.Calendar, and java.text.SimpleDateFormat are now legacy, supplanted by the java.time classes built into Java 8 and later. See Tutorial by Oracle.
  • this answer is incorrect. Tried printing new Date(millis) from long millis = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")).getTimeInMillis(); It still gives current time zone time.
  • @JavaEnthusiast ideone.com/seLqnz it gives the time in GMT here regardless of the timezone.
  • All of these give me my local timezone, which is not GMT.
  • @Forseth11 That is not correct. They are all GMT unless your system clock has been set incorrectly.
  • @PeterLawrey My bad. I was using a date format put in my local timezone to display the time. Sorry.
  • A java.util.Date is already in UTC. This code makes no sense to me.
  • Wrong. From a ZonedDateTime of 2020-04-22T00:00+08:00[Asia/Shanghai] I got Tue Apr 21 08:00:00 GMT 2020. It’s the same hour of day, but it’s not the same time. Also an old-fashioned Date has got neither zone offset nor time zone, so it doesn’t make any sense to say that it is or isn’t in GMT.
  • While this code may answer the question, it would be better to include some context, explaining how it works and when to use it. Code-only answers are not useful in the long run.