loop function with different number of argument python

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I am trying to loop over a function that allows different number of arguments (sympy.Polygon)

every iteration the code must set a different polygon, so it could be 3,4 o n number of vertices:

sympy.Polygon(a1,a2,a3)
sympy.Polygon(b1,b2,b3,b4,b5)

how can I set this task ?

Have you tried this?

import sympy

points = [(0,0),(0,1), (1,1), (1,2)]
sympy.Polygon(*points)

Using * you can send any number of arguments to sympy.Polygon.

Best

4. More Control Flow Tools, It is possible to let the range start at another number, or to specify a Loop statements may have an else clause; it is executed when the loop It is also possible to define functions with a variable number of arguments. The range() function in Python is often used in for statements to define the number of loop iterations. This built-in function creates lists containing arithmetic progressions. The syntax of the range() function is: range(start, stop [, step])

For nameless arguments as you want you could use *argv as in this way

def Ploygon(*argv):  
    for arg in argv:  
        print (arg) 

If you need named variables look into **kwargs

4. More Control Flow Tools, Instead, it is usually more straight-forward to loop over a copy of the collection or to It is also possible to define functions with a variable number of arguments. I have a Python function accepting several string arguments def foo(a, b, c): and concatenating them in a string. I want to iterate over all function arguments to check they are not None.

def some_function(*args):
    print("New function call---")
    for arg in args:
        print("arg =>",arg)


some_function("arg1","arg2","arg3")
some_function("arg1","arg2")
some_function("arg1","arg2","arg3", "arg4")

You can achieve that as above example.

Output:

New function call---
arg => arg1
arg => arg2
arg => arg3
New function call---
arg => arg1
arg => arg2
New function call---
arg => arg1
arg => arg2
arg => arg3
arg => arg4

Multiple Function Arguments - Learn Python, Every function in Python receives a predefined number of arguments, if declared normally, like this: def myfunction(first, second, third): # do something with the 3  Lets say I have a list like this. a = [1, 23, 456, 6789] And I want to change the position of the elements in each position of the list. The output would be, every number is moved up one position until the end of the string, and it moves to the front of the string.

Python Tutorial: Passing Arguments, First, let's have a look at the integer variables below. The parameter inside the function remains a reference to the argument's variable, as long as the parameter​  Here, we have called the function with multiple arguments. These arguments get wrapped up into a tuple before being passed into the function. Inside the function, we use a for loop to retrieve all the arguments back.

*args and **kwargs in Python, The syntax is to use the symbol * to take in a variable number of arguments; like iterate over it, run some higher order functions such as map and filter, etc. In this article, we will learn how to use Python’s range() function with the help of different examples. The built-in function range() generates the integer numbers between the given start integer to the stop integer, i.e., It returns a range object. Using for loop, we can iterate over a sequence of numbers produced by the range() function. Let’s understand how to use a range() function of Python 3 with the help of a simple example.

Python *args and **kwargs, The syntax is to use the symbol * to take in a variable number of arguments; can do things like iterate over it, run some higher order functions such as map and  The "bar" function receives 3 arguments. If an additional "action" argument is received, and it instructs on summing up the numbers, then the sum is printed out. Alternatively, the function also knows it must return the first argument, if the value of the "number" parameter, passed into the function, is equal to "first". Exercise

Comments
  • It's probably worth reviewing Unpacking Argument Lists and the * operator when used as *<iterable>.
  • I agree with jedwards, you could do something like simpy.Polygon(*[your_args])