What does the M stand for in C# Decimal literal notation?

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In order to work with decimal data types, I have to do this with variable initialization:

decimal aValue = 50.0M;

What does the M part stand for?

It means it's a decimal literal, as others have said. However, the origins are probably not those suggested elsewhere in this answer. From the C# Annotated Standard (the ECMA version, not the MS version):

The decimal suffix is M/m since D/d was already taken by double. Although it has been suggested that M stands for money, Peter Golde recalls that M was chosen simply as the next best letter in decimal.

A similar annotation mentions that early versions of C# included "Y" and "S" for byte and short literals respectively. They were dropped on the grounds of not being useful very often.

Literals in C#, point or is not within the range of binary integers. The decimal suffix is M/m since D/d was already taken by double. Although it has been suggested that M stands for money, Peter Golde recalls that M was chosen simply as the next best letter in decimal. A similar annotation mentions that early versions of C# included "Y" and "S" for byte and short literals respectively.

From C# specifications:

var f = 0f; // float
var d = 0d; // double
var m = 0m; // decimal (money)
var u = 0u; // unsigned int
var l = 0l; // long
var ul = 0ul; // unsigned long

Note that you can use an uppercase or lowercase notation.

C# decimal Examples, Solution. It means it's a decimal literal, as others have said. However, the origins are probably not those suggested elsewhere in this answer. From the C#  The literal with the m or M suffix is of type decimal; The following code demonstrates an example of each: double d = 3D; d = 4d; d = 3.934_001; float f = 3_000.5F; f = 5.4f; decimal myMoney = 3_000.5m; myMoney = 400.75M; The preceding example also shows the use of _ as a digit separator, which is supported starting with C# 7.0. You can use the digit separator with all kinds of numeric literals.

M refers to the first non-ambiguous character in "decimal". If you don't add it the number will be treated as a double.

D is double.

Difference between decimal, float and double in .NET?, The fourth part of the C# Fundamentals tutorial discusses the C# numeric literals. These are A numeric literal is a fixed number that may be assigned to a variable or used in calculations. Literals decimal, M or m, 123.45M Programmers often represent numbers using hexadecimal, rather than decimal. If you want a numeric literal to be treated as decimal, you must use the m or M suffix, for example: decimal myMoney = 314.15M; If you forget to add the M suffix, you will receive the following compiler error: Literal of type double cannot be implicitly converted to type ‘decimal’; use an ‘M’ suffix to create a literal of this type. Decimal Conversions. Integral types are implicitly converted to decimal, and their result evaluates to decimal.

A real literal suffixed by M or m is of type decimal. For example, the literals 1m, 1.5m, 1e10m, and 123.456M are all of type decimal. This literal is converted to a decimal value by taking the exact value, and, if necessary, rounding to the nearest representable value using banker's rounding. Any scale apparent in the literal is preserved unless the value is rounded or the value is zero (in which latter case the sign and scale will be 0). Hence, the literal 2.900m will be parsed to form the decimal with sign 0, coefficient 2900, and scale 3.

Read more about real literals

Constants, See examples of numeric suffix syntax. Recall that "literal" means a value hard-​coded into your program. Use unsigned suffix. uint u1 = 1000U; // Use decimal suffix. decimal m2 = 4000.1234M; // Use unsigned suffix and long suffix. ulong  To specify a decimal literal, follow its value with an m or M. For example, 9.95M is a decimal literal. Although integer literals create an int, uint, long, or ulong value by default, they can still be assigned to variables of type byte, sbyte, short, or ushort as long as the value being assigned can be represented by the target type.

Well, i guess M represent the mantissa. Decimal can be used to save money, but it doesn't mean, decimal only used for money.

What does the M stand for in C# Decimal literal notation?, In order to work with decimal data types, I have to do this with variable initialization: decimal aValue = 50.0M;. What does the M part stand for? What does AM  from System import * def CalculateVAT(amount): return amount * Decimal(1.21) Is there a short-hand notation DLR that the number 1.21 should be interpreted as a Decimal, much like I would use the '1.21m' notation in C#? Or is there any other way to enforce decimal to be used instead of double?

Floating-point numeric types, So C# has decimals, numeric real literals which are stored as doubles unless you suffix it with the type (M or m for decimal) I don't quite understand the (register allocation). This is about syntax (parsing). It means you're using a number of type "decimal" and not of type "float". They're both stored with  I have a project coming up where I’d like to be able to write some declarative configuration in an object literal notation similar to JSON. The project is going to be written in C#, so I could embed a Javascript implementation like IronJS and just use JSON, or I could try using IronPython or some other .NET language that supports object literals.

C# Numeric Literals, To work with decimal data types, I have to do it with variable initialization: decimal value = 50.0 m;. What stands for M part? This means that it is a decimal verb,  Rules for creating an exponential notation. The following are the rules for creating a float literal in exponential notation: In exponential notation, the mantissa can be specified either in decimal or fractional form. An exponent can be written in both uppercase and lowercase, i.e., e and E.

C# Numeric Suffix Examples, This question already has an answer here: What does the M stand for in C# Decimal literal notation? 6 answers decimal l = 50.0M; I have seen other answers​  Because the "float" and "decimal" is just specifying the type for the variable, not the literal. When you assign a literal value to the variable, the compiler has to figure out what that literal

Comments
  • That leaves the question why E/e was not the next best letter.
  • "e" would be problematic in that it's already used in literals. For instance "2e4m" is a valid literal (decimal 20000). Even if it were unambiguous (and it may well be, although "1e" ends up with a curious compiler error message suggesting it's out of the range of viable doubles, not that it's syntactically invalid; I suspect that's a bug) it would still be confusing. "c" would possibly make sense without causing any confusion, although it would no doubt suggest "currency" to people :)
  • "c" conflicts with the character literal for strings in VB.Net, though even there the grammar is a little different.
  • I wouldn't have too much problem with it being different in C# and VB. VB already has different hex syntax for example, IIRC.
  • If you lay out the syllables of "Decimal", you get "De Ci Mal". These make the most sense to use. D is already taken, C could be characters, M seems like a logical choice.
  • I suppose there is some important reason, but it irritates me that you get a compile-time error if you leave the m out of the literal. It's not as if it's ambiguous.
  • @JSON It works that way for integer types, because there's no ambiguity there - as long as it fits the type, it will not lose/garble any information. The same is not true of decimal numbers. Casting the double value 0.42 to decimal can give you a different value than 0.42M (and the same for using a double literal in place of a float literal - float val = 423.3 also fails). So you're choosing between a subtly wrong behavior and a compiler error that takes half a second to fix and conforms to the CLR and C# standards.
  • "M", like in "deciMal"
  • That is indeed a guess, and it's much less plausible than the "first available non-ambiguous character" hypothesis. If you have supporting evidence, include it in your answer.