How do I show the changes which have been staged?

view files in staging area
git stage changes
git diff
git view stashed changes
changes not staged for commit:
git commit
git add
git remove from staging

I staged a few changes to be committed; how can I see the diff of all files which are staged for the next commit? I'm aware of git status, but I'd like to see the actual diffs - not just the names of files which are staged.

I saw that the git-diff(1) man page says

git diff [--options] [--] […]

This form is to view the changes you made relative to the index (staging area for the next commit). In other words, the differences are what you could tell git to further add to the index but you still haven't. You can stage these changes by using git-add(1).

Unfortunately, I can't quite make sense of this. There must be some handy one-liner which I could create an alias for, right?


It should just be:

git diff --cached

--cached means show the changes in the cache/index (i.e. staged changes) against the current HEAD. --staged is a synonym for --cached.

--staged and --cached does not point to HEAD, just difference with respect to HEAD. If you cherry pick what to commit using git add --patch (or git add -p), --staged will return what is staged.

How to Show the Changes which Have Been Staged, You can use --cached option which shows you the staged changes in cache/​index. git diff --cached. --staged is the synonym for --cached. You can use --cached option which shows you the staged changes in cache/index. git diff --cached--staged is the synonym for --cached. These will not point to HEAD, but it just shows the difference with respect to HEAD. If you want cherry-pick to commit using. git add --patch --staged. This command will show you what is staged.


A simple graphic makes this clearer:

git diff

Shows the changes between the working directory and the index. This shows what has been changed, but is not staged for a commit.

git diff --cached

Shows the changes between the index and the HEAD (which is the last commit on this branch). This shows what has been added to the index and staged for a commit.

git diff HEAD

Shows all the changes between the working directory and HEAD (which includes changes in the index). This shows all the changes since the last commit, whether or not they have been staged for commit or not.

Also:

There is a bit more detail on 365Git.

How do I show the changes which have been staged?, This form is to view the changes you staged for the next commit relative for web development, learning and the world we live in | Need some  01 Adding changes. Now command git to stage changes. Check the status. Run: git add hello.html git status. You will see … Result: $ git add hello.html $ git status # On branch master # Changes to be committed: # (use "git reset HEAD <file>" to unstage) # # modified: hello.html # Changes to the hello.html have been staged.


If you'd be interested in a visual side-by-side view, the diffuse visual diff tool can do that. It will even show three panes if some but not all changes are staged. In the case of conflicts, there will even be four panes.

Invoke it with

diffuse -m

in your Git working copy.

If you ask me, the best visual differ I've seen for a decade. Also, it is not specific to Git: It interoperates with a plethora of other VCS, including SVN, Mercurial, Bazaar, ...

See also: Show both staged & working tree in git diff?

Git: Show staged changes - DEV, Git also has a short status flag so you can see your changes in a more tracked have a ?? next to them, new files that have been added to the staging area  If you have more than one file with staged changes, it may more practical to use git add -i, then select 6: diff, and finally pick the file(s) you are interested in. If you'd be interested in a visual side-by-side view, the diffuse visual diff tool can do that. It will even show three panes if some but not all changes are staged.


Note that git status -v also shows the staged changes! (meaning you need to have staged -- git add -- some changes. No staged changes, no diff with git status -v. It does that since Git 1.2.0, February 2006)

In its long form (default), git status has an undocumented "verbose" option which actually display the diff between HEAD and index.

And it is about to become even more complete: see "Show both staged & working tree in git diff?" (git 2.3.4+, Q2 2015):

git status -v -v

Recording Changes to the Repository, This form is to view the changes you staged for the next commit relative to the Compute the dirstat numbers by counting the lines that have been removed from​  By default, running git stash will stash: changes that have been added to your index (staged changes) changes made to files that are currently tracked by Git (unstaged changes) But it will not stash: new files in your working copy that have not yet been staged; files that have been ignored


You can use this command.

git diff --cached --name-only

The --cached option of git diff means to get staged files, and the --name-only option means to get only names of the files.

git-diff Documentation, If you want to see only changes that have already been added to the Staging Area, "git diff --staged" is your command of choice. Inspecting Committed Changes. But git status told me Changes not staged for commit. To brief, I only know there are 3 stages in git untracked, staged, committed Can any one tell me , what was the stage in for Changes not staged for commit. So if I modified the file a (already in the repo) and type git st, the git will tell me Changes not staged for commit


Inspecting Changes with Diffs, You've updated a file, but you've forgotten the specific changes you made. Because Git knows what the previous version looked like, it can show you the differences. Find a Workspace on Treehouse that you've been working in for a while, and git diff --staged, 4:47 it will show only the version of our paragraph that has  The best way to do this is by running the command: git diff --name-only --cached When you check the manual you will likely find the following:--name-only Show only names of changed files. And on the example part of the manual: git diff --cached Changes between the index and your last commit.


Viewing Changes to a File | Introduction to Git, You will see … Result: $ git add hello.html $ git status # On branch master # Changes to be committed: # (use Changes to the hello.html have been staged. Staged changesare a lot like unstaged changes, except that they’ve been marked to be committed the next time you run git commit. Upon your next commit, your staged changes become part of your Git history. git statuswill no longer list them as changes since they’re part of your last commit now.


6. Staging the changes, Saying git diff only shows unstaged changes against HEAD (or any hash or branch you supplied) but leaves out files you already staged for the next commit. another Pull Request, you will still see them after the "child" PR has been merged. Staged local changes (before you commit) Let’s say you have added some files to staging, but you want to remove them from the current commit, yet you want to retain those changes - just move them outside of the staging tree. You also have an option to discard all changes with git reset --hard or think about git stash as described earlier.