Guard statement with two conditions in Swift

Guard statement with two conditions in Swift

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My understanding is that having two conditions in a guard statement separated by a comma functions imposes the requirement that they both be true. I can write a guard statement with either one independently and the code compiles but when I combine them with a comma, it gives an error. Is there anything wrong with my syntax or can anyone explain why it fails to compile?

guard (mode != "mapme") else {  //compiles
}

guard (!annotation is MKUserLocation) else { //compiles
}

guard (mode != "mapme",!(annotation is MKUserLocation)) else { //gives error:'(Bool, Bool)' is not convertible to 'Bool'

}

You are using too many pointless parentheses, basically don't use parentheses in if and guard statements in simple expressions.

The error occurs because the compiler treats the enclosing parentheses as tuple ((Bool, Bool)), that's what the error message says.

guard mode != "mapme" else {

guard !(annotation is MKUserLocation) else { // here the parentheses are useful but the `!` must be outside of the expression

guard mode != "mapme", !(annotation is MKUserLocation) else {

Multiple conditions in guard statement swift, // Check this code func demo(){ var str = [String: String]() str["status"] = "blue" str["​asd"] = nil guard let var2 = str["asd"], let var1 = str["status"] else  In swift you do not need the outer brackets on, if statements, for loops and all that. It is generally considered good practice not to include them, in your case here the guard statement becomes a tuple when you include the brackets. So just change your code to this and it should all work.


If you want to use parenthesis, just use && operator (or || if you want an OR clause)

guard (mode != "mapme" && !(annotation is MKUserLocation)) else {

Guard Statement With Multiple Conditions Style Guide Suggestion , r/swift: Swift is a general-purpose programming language built using a modern approach to safety, performance, and software design patterns. To answer Prabhav's question, yes, you are correct, each condition in a guard statement must be true in order to proceed (i.e., not go into the else block). In this sense, it is indeed like separating conditions with AND logic.


In swift you do not need the outer brackets on, if statements, for loops and all that. It is generally considered good practice not to include them, in your case here the guard statement becomes a tuple when you include the brackets. So just change your code to this and it should all work.

guard mode != "mapme" else {  //compiles
}

guard !(annotation is MKUserLocation) else { //compiles
}

guard mode != "mapme", !(annotation is MKUserLocation) else { 

}

Guard Statements in Swift, Guard combines two powerful concepts that we're already used to in Swift: optional unwrapping and where clauses. The former allows us to avoid the pyramid of  In the above program ,the guard statement contains two conditions separated by comma. The first condition let temp = name unwraps an optional which returns true in our case and the second condition temp.count > 0 checks if the unwrapped string has more than 0 characters which evaluates to false in our example.


Guard Statement Explained In Swift (How To) – LearnAppMaking, The guard statement in Swift helps you return your functions early if a condition Imagine you have multiple conditions that check for validity. Guard combines two powerful concepts that we’re already used to in Swift: optional unwrapping and where clauses. The former allows us to avoid the pyramid of doom or its alternative, the very long if let statement. The latter attaches simple but powerful expressions with the where clause so we can further vet the results we’re validating.


Optional binding and defer statements in iOS swift, Guard statement is simple and powerful. It checks for some condition and if it evaluates to be false , then the else statement executes which  Guard Statements were first introduced in Swift 2. In the first glance, they look very much like an if-else statement. But they were introduced to tackle a condition in which, we can only proceed if a certain condition turns out to be true.


Swift Guard Statements Explained (Code Examples), Imagine if there are even more fields, it will result in a landmine of brackets and if.​.else's that is very confusing to read. Multiple conditions. Guard  A guard statement is used to transfer program control out of a scope if one or more conditions aren’t met. To sum up their main intention in two words: EARLY EXIT