Select where count of one field is greater than one

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I want to do something like this:

SELECT * 
  FROM db.table 
 WHERE COUNT(someField) > 1

How can I achieve this in MySql?

Use the HAVING, not WHERE clause, for aggregate result comparison.

Taking the query at face value:

SELECT * 
  FROM db.table 
HAVING COUNT(someField) > 1

Ideally, there should be a GROUP BY defined for proper valuation in the HAVING clause, but MySQL does allow hidden columns from the GROUP BY...

Is this in preparation for a unique constraint on someField? Looks like it should be...

sql - Select where count of one field is greater than one, Use the HAVING , not WHERE clause, for aggregate result comparison. Taking the query at face value: SELECT * FROM db.table HAVING COUNT(someField) >​  Select where count of one field is greater than Select where count of one field is greater than one. 0 votes . 1 view. asked Jul 29, 2019 in SQL by Tech4ever (22

SELECT username, numb from(
Select username, count(username) as numb from customers GROUP BY username ) as my_table
WHERE numb > 3

SQL COUNT() with HAVING, 1. number of agents must be greater than 3,. the following SQL statement can be used: SELECT COUNT( * ) FROM agents HAVING  Use the HAVING clause and GROUP By the fields that make the row unique. The below will find . all users that have more than one payment per day with the same account number. SELECT user_id , COUNT(*) count FROM PAYMENT GROUP BY account, user_id , date Having COUNT(*) > 1

You can also do this with a self-join:

SELECT t1.* FROM db.table t1
JOIN db.table t2 ON t1.someField = t2.someField AND t1.pk != t2.pk

Select where count of one field is greater than one, Use the HAVING, not WHERE clause, for aggregate result comparison. Taking the query at face value: SELECT *. FROM db.table. HAVING COUNT(someField)​  But I also want to filter these result, meaning I want only where count(*) is greater than 2500 so only bigger than 2500 occurence will shown, but: SELECT * FROM ( SELECT ItemMetaData.KEY, ItemMetaData.VALUE, count(*) FROM ItemMetaData GROUP BY ItemMetaData.KEY ORDER BY count(*) desc ) as result WHERE count(*)>2500;

Here you go:

SELECT Field1, COUNT(Field1)
  FROM Table1 
 GROUP BY Field1
HAVING COUNT(Field1) > 1
ORDER BY Field1 desc

Select where count of one field is greater than one, sql query for finding records where count > 1 select where count greater than 1 group by select from sql where count 1 sql select count of rows with same values​  G) Using Oracle COUNT() and HAVING clause to find duplicate values You can use the COUNT() function and a HAVING clause to find rows with duplicate values in a specified column. For example, the following statement returns the contacts’ last names that appear more than one:

One way

SELECT t1.* 
FROM db.table t1
WHERE exists 
      (SELECT *
      FROM db.table t2 
      where t1.pk != t2.pk 
      and t1.someField = t2.someField)

MySQL GROUP BY with WHERE clause and condition count greater , The query to create a table is as follows −mysql> create table MySQL GROUP BY with WHERE clause and condition count greater than 1? The GROUP BY with HAVING clause retrieves the result for a specific group of a column, which matches the condition specified in the HAVING clause. Example: To get data of number of agents from the 'agents' table with the following condition - 1. number of agents must be greater than 3, the following SQL statement can be used:

MySQL select to count values equal to 0 and greater than 0 from a , MySQL select to count values equal to 0 and greater than 0 from a mysql> insert into DemoTable values(10); Query OK, 1 row affected (0.17  that is, the number of rows where column B is either “Male” or “Female”, column C is either “Sea lion” or “Mite” and column D is “Basketball” (answer: 1). Now let’s see what happens if we attempt to extend the criteria for column D to more than a single entry, e.g.:

Summarize Your SQL Results with the GROUP BY clause, Use GROUP BY to summarize query results. In SQL groups are unique combinations of fields. Rather than returning every row in a table, when values are grouped, only the COUNT is an example of an aggregate function, these are what really give the If we wanted to find all orders greater than $1000 we would write If you want to take an action when a cell value is greater than a certain value, you can use the IF function to test a value and return one value if the test is true, and another if the test is false. In the example shown, we are using this formula in cell F6. =

Count data by using a query - Access, You can count the number of items in a field (a column of values) by using the Count a Total row calculates grand totals for one or more columns (fields) of data. the Count function works on a larger number of data types than do the other  The basic syntax of the COUNTIF is: =COUNTIF (range, criteria) In the range field, you need to give the range where you are looking forward to count the number of cells. In the criteria field, you need to provide the criteria. Criteria can be numbers, string, cell references, or expressions.

Comments
  • Needs a GROUP BY surely (unless this is some MySQL non standard thing)?
  • @Martin Smith: Took the query at face value; addressed GROUP BY issue (incl. hidden columns feature).
  • "Looks like it should be..." Why? I am in need of education on this :)
  • So this will return the whole table if it contains more than 2 non null someField values or an empty result set if it doesn't.
  • @Dave: If you were in a position where you had to periodically check & correct bad data, wouldn't you want to stop the situation from happening in the first place? MySQL implements a unique constraint as an index - for more info see the CREATE INDEX documentation
  • the only caveat here (at least in 5.1.46-community MySQL Community Server (GPL)) is that "Every derived table must have its own alias", that will make you sql look like: SELECT username, numb from( Select username, count(username) as numb from customers GROUP BY username ) as my_table WHERE numb > 3
  • Not entirely true - use the GROUP BY to manipulate what the HAVING is using.
  • This is not really an answer.