addEventListener on NodeList

nodelist foreach
nodelist to array
queryselectorall addeventlistener
addeventlistener is not a function
nodelist onclick
addeventlistener bind
edge nodelist foreach
addeventlistener callback

Does NodeList support addEventListener. If not what is the best way to add EventListener to all the nodes of the NodeList. Currently I am using the code snippet as show below, is there a better way to do this.

var ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
for(var xx=0;xx < ar_coins.length;xx++)
{
        ar_coins.item(xx).addEventListener('dragstart',handleDragStart,false);
}

There is no way to do it without looping through every element. You could, of course, write a function to do it for you.

function addEventListenerList(list, event, fn) {
    for (var i = 0, len = list.length; i < len; i++) {
        list[i].addEventListener(event, fn, false);
    }
}

var ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
addEventListenerList(ar_coins, 'dragstart', handleDragStart); 

or a more specialized version:

function addEventListenerByClass(className, event, fn) {
    var list = document.getElementsByClassName(className);
    for (var i = 0, len = list.length; i < len; i++) {
        list[i].addEventListener(event, fn, false);
    }
}

addEventListenerByClass('coins', 'dragstart', handleDragStart); 

And, though you didn't ask about jQuery, this is the kind of stuff that jQuery is particularly good at:

$('.coins').on('dragstart', handleDragStart);

How to add a click event to a list of DOM elements returned from , addEventListener('click', function(event) { // }) } It's important to note that document. querySelectorAll() does not return an array, but a NodeList object. You can iterate it with forEach or for..of , or you can transform it to an array with Array. addEventListener () is the way to register an event listener as specified in W3C DOM. The benefits are as follows: It allows adding more than a single handler for an event. This is particularly useful for AJAX libraries, JavaScript modules, or any other kind of code that needs to work well with other libraries/extensions.

The best I could come up with was this:

const $coins = document.querySelectorAll('.coins')
$coins.forEach($coin => $coin.addEventListener('dragstart', handleDragStart));

Note that this uses ES6 features, so please make sure to transpile it first!

NodeList, Object.defineProperty(NodeList.prototype, "addEventListener", { value: function (​event, callback, useCapture) { useCapture = ( !! useCapture) | false; for (var i = 0;​  nodelist foreach (4) Does NodeList support addEventListener. If not what is the best way to add EventListener to all the nodes of the NodeList. Currently I am using the code snippet as show below, is there a better way to do this.

There actually is a way to do this without a loop:

[].forEach.call(nodeList,function(e){e.addEventListener('click',callback,false)})

And this way is used in one of my one-liner helper libraries - nanoQuery.

javascript addEventListener on NodeList?, can be selected using a programming language such as JavaScript. addEventListener() method not called when accessed by array The code below reads the unicode value of the key that was pressed down by the user and then prints it out on the screen. It works like intended:

The simplest example is to add this functionality to NodeList

NodeList.prototype.addEventListener = function (event_name, callback, useCapture)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
    {
      this[i].addEventListener(event_name, callback, useCapture);
    }
};

Now you can do:

document.querySelectorAll(".my-button").addEventListener("click", function ()
{
    alert("Hi");
});

In the same way, you can do a forEach loop

NodeList.prototype.forEach = function (callback)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
    {
      callback(this[i], i);
    }
};

Using:

document.querySelectorAll(".buttons").forEach(function (element, id)
{
    input.addEventListener("change", function ()
    {
        alert("button: " + id);
    });
});

EDIT : note that NodeList.prototype.forEach has existed ever since november 2016 in FF. No IE support though

JavaScript DOM Nodelist, , it is possible to iterate over it with forEach() . Definition and Usage. The addEventListener () method attaches an event handler to the specified element. Tip: Use the removeEventListener () method to remove an event handler that has been attached with the addEventListener () method.

in es6, you can do a array from nodelist, using Array.from, e.g.

ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
Array
 .from(ar_coins)
 .forEach(addEvent)

function addEvent(element) {
  element.addEventListener('click', callback)
}

or just use arrow functions

Array
  .from(ar_coins)
  .forEach(element => element.addEventListener('click', callback))

What is a NodeList?, AddEventListener to NodeList. addEventListener.js. NodeList.prototype.​addEventListener = function (eventType, callback, options) {. for (var i = 0; i < this.​length;  The JavaScript addEventListener () method can also make it easier to control the way an event reacts to bubbling. JavaScript is separated from the markup of HTML when using the JavaScript addEventListener () to improve readability, and will even allow adding event listeners without the control of the HTML markup.

How do I use .forEach on DOM Elements? - DEV, addEventListener('click', function (event) { console.log('2', btns[i]); i is bigger than the number of items in our node list, and the loop ends. NodeList.forEach() Executes a provided function once per NodeList element, passing the element as an argument to the function. NodeList.keys() Returns an iterator, allowing code to go through all the keys of the key/value pairs contained in the collection. (In this case, the keys are numbers starting from 0.) NodeList.values()

AddEventListener to NodeList · GitHub, addEventListener on NodeList. nodelist to array nodelist foreach queryselectorall addeventlistener addeventlistener is not a function addeventlistener bind The document.addEventListener () method attaches an event handler to the document. Tip: Use the document.removeEventListener () method to remove an event handler that has been attached with the addEventListener () method.

Why you shouldn't attach event listeners in a for loop with vanilla , NodeList prend-il en charge addEventListener? Sinon, quel est le meilleur moyen d'ajouter EventListener à tous les nœuds de NodeList. Actuellement, j'​utilise  If you’re a web designer who’s yet to step into the world of JavaScript, or you’re just starting in front end development, this tutorial is the perfect way to begin. It will explain a couple of

Comments
  • While I know that jQuery isn't the answer for everything, it does make these sorts of issues moot: $('.coins').on('dragstart', handleDragStart);
  • Be careful, getElementsByClassName returns a live node list.
  • @SalmanPK - that shouldn't matter here. The result of getElementsByClassName() is used immediately and not stored so there is no opportunity for it to change while it is being used.
  • Delicious... :-)
  • Super-clean - and two years on, less need for transpiling with more browser ES6 support.
  • In 2020 the spread operator is unneccesary.
  • Thanks @okay56k, I updated the answer to reflect that.
  • This doesn't use loop-control constructs and odd variables.
  • Even if you argue that it is still a loop, this is pretty badass. Thank you.
  • In my use case, this method only saves 5 keystrokes relative to the traditional for-loop. However, I love not having to define any iteration variable...and, hey, saving 5 keystrokes is still something.
  • Maybe it saves you a few keystrokes, but it costs the next developer an extra few minutes to understand. Net loss.
  • FYI, it is 2018, and NodeLists are iterable in most browsers. nodeList.foreach(el => el.addEventListener('click', callback)) should be adequate for most people. And if not, ES6 allows us to easily "spread" an array-like object into an actually array. So something like this: [...nodeList].foreach should work as well.
  • Your arrow function needs a closing parenthesis at the very end to work. Cheers.
  • I upvoted this answer because (1) it answers the question, (2) it is different than the other answers, (3) it is clever, and (4) it may be what someone is looking for. However, I have to say that anything that modifies the prototype of one of the core Javascript objects makes me nervous.
  • @AndrewWillems Thanks! And I understand the general concern of modifying native prototypes, but I view it as similar to extending a class from a lib you don't own. :)