Get program execution time in the shell

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I want to execute something in a linux shell under a few different conditions, and be able to output the execution time of each execution.

I know I could write a perl or python script that would do this, but is there a way I can do it in the shell? (which happens to be bash)

Use the built-in time keyword:

$ help time

time: time [-p] PIPELINE
    Execute PIPELINE and print a summary of the real time, user CPU time,
    and system CPU time spent executing PIPELINE when it terminates.
    The return status is the return status of PIPELINE.  The `-p' option
    prints the timing summary in a slightly different format.  This uses
    the value of the TIMEFORMAT variable as the output format.

Example:

$ time sleep 2
real    0m2.009s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.004s

How To Find The Execution Time Of A Command Or Process In Linux, To measure the execution time of a command/program, just run. The built-in '​time' shell keyword is available in most shells like BASH, ZSH,  See how easy it was to display the execution time of the script. You can also use the time command to get the run time of the script. time ./script.sh. The output for the above will be a little different then what you saw before. It will show the execution time in detail here. You can see that the execution time is 12.010 seconds, not 12 seconds.

You can get much more detailed information than the bash built-in time (which Robert Gamble mentions) using time(1). Normally this is /usr/bin/time.

Editor's note: To ensure that you're invoking the external utility time rather than your shell's time keyword, invoke it as /usr/bin/time. time is a POSIX-mandated utility, but the only option it is required to support is -p. Specific platforms implement specific, nonstandard extensions: -v works with GNU's time utility, as demonstrated below (the question is tagged linux); the BSD/macOS implementation uses -l to produce similar output - see man 1 time.

Example of verbose output:


$ /usr/bin/time -v sleep 1
       Command being timed: "sleep 1"
       User time (seconds): 0.00
       System time (seconds): 0.00
       Percent of CPU this job got: 1%
       Elapsed (wall clock) time (h:mm:ss or m:ss): 0:01.05
       Average shared text size (kbytes): 0
       Average unshared data size (kbytes): 0
       Average stack size (kbytes): 0
       Average total size (kbytes): 0
       Maximum resident set size (kbytes): 0
       Average resident set size (kbytes): 0
       Major (requiring I/O) page faults: 0
       Minor (reclaiming a frame) page faults: 210
       Voluntary context switches: 2
       Involuntary context switches: 1
       Swaps: 0
       File system inputs: 0
       File system outputs: 0
       Socket messages sent: 0
       Socket messages received: 0
       Signals delivered: 0
       Page size (bytes): 4096
       Exit status: 0

Measure time of program execution, This article describes the time command in Linux and how you can use this command to determine the duration of execution of a command. Get program execution time in the shell? I want to execute something in a linux shell under a few different conditions, and be able to output the execution time of each execution. I know I could write a perl or python script that would do this, but is there a way I can do it in the shell?

#!/bin/bash
START=$(date +%s)
# do something
# start your script work here
ls -R /etc > /tmp/x
rm -f /tmp/x
# your logic ends here
END=$(date +%s)
DIFF=$(( $END - $START ))
echo "It took $DIFF seconds"

bash how to measure execution time, What is the command to find the execution time of a Unix command? The built-in ‘time’ shell keyword is available in most shells like BASH, ZSH, CSH, KSH, TCSH etc. The ‘time’ shell keyword has less options than the executables. The only option you can use in ‘time’ keyword is -p. You know now how to find the total execution time of a given command/process using ‘time’ command.

For a line-by-line delta measurement, try gnomon.

A command line utility, a bit like moreutils's ts, to prepend timestamp information to the standard output of another command. Useful for long-running processes where you'd like a historical record of what's taking so long.

You can also use the --high and/or --medium options to specify a length threshold in seconds, over which gnomon will highlight the timestamp in red or yellow. And you can do a few other things, too.

How to get execution time of a script effectively?, That way, times will be called whenever the shell exits and the exit status will be preserved. $ bash -c 'trap times EXIT; : {1..1000000}'  H ow do I get the current server time in shell script on Linux or Unix-like operating systems? How do I store the current time in the shell variable and use in my scripts? You can use the date command to display or set the current date and time. You need to use the date FORMAT syntax to controls the output of the date command.

Should you want more precision, use %N with date (and use bc for the diff, because $(()) only handles integers).

Here's how to do it:

start=$(date +%s.%N)
# do some stuff here
dur=$(echo "$(date +%s.%N) - $start" | bc)

printf "Execution time: %.6f seconds" $dur

Example:

start=$(date +%s.%N); \
  sleep 0.1s; \
  dur=$(echo "$(date +%s.%N) - $start" | bc); \
  printf "Execution time: %.6f seconds\n" $dur

Result:

Execution time: 0.104623 seconds

How to determine execution time of a command in Linux?, According to the tool's man page, time runs programs and summarizes system resource usage. By default, the command produces time-related  $ help time time: time [-p] PIPELINE Execute PIPELINE and print a summary of the real time, user CPU time, and system CPU time spent executing PIPELINE when it terminates. The return status is the return status of PIPELINE. The `-p' option prints the timing summary in a slightly different format.

How to get script execution time from within the shell script in Linux, Find out the elapsed time in minutes using bash script. Shell script execution time​. Get script execution time. get command execution time in  We have already discussed a way to find time taken by a function through C libraries. If we are on Linux, then it becomes very easy to find time taken by a program/command. We can use time command for this purpose. The time taken is shown in three forms. real: Total end to end time taken by program/command user: Time taken in user mode.

command line, bash, how, to, measure, execution, time, shell, video, training, tutorials, lectures, vienna, edinburgh, unix. Find the Total Execution Time of a Program or Command Using PowerShell PowerShell includes the built-in Measure-Command cmdlet that helps you measure the time it takes to run script blocks, cmdlets, or even external programs.

Get program execution time in the shell, Add time before the command you want to measure. For example: time ls . The output will look like: real 0m0.606s user 0m0.000s sys 0m0. I am writting a script in the ksh shell and am trying to find a way to report the total execution time of the script without requiring the user to specify the time function when executing the script. Does anyone have any examples they have used.

Comments
  • Windows case: stackoverflow.com/questions/673523/…
  • is it possible to get the Ticks like the windows case?
  • unix.stackexchange.com/questions/52313/…
  • How is this used on a command like time -p i=x; while read line; do x=x; done < /path/to/file.txt? It immediatly returns 0.00 unless I don't put anything before the while loop.. what gives?
  • this is poor 'time' version, bash builtin. where is external 'time' command?
  • @Znik, try /usr/bin/time
  • @natli: While time can time an entire pipeline as-is (by virtue of being a Bash keyword), you need to use a group command ({ ...; ...; }) to time multiple commands: time -p { i=x; while read line; do x=x; done < /path/to/file.txt; }
  • To see all versions of time you have installed on your system, you can use type -a time
  • you wouldn't happen to know what debian package that would come from? doesn't seem to be installed by default
  • I was referencing your post Robert. Unless you mean the command you suggest is not the bash built-in?
  • Amazingly enough, it's installed from a package called "time".