How do I assign an xlwings function to a button

When I create a module under xlwings to call a Python script, how do I assign it to a button on excel?

Trying to assign a macros to a button seems to only provide options of functions in the main workbook.

I don't think you can assign a Python script to an Excel button, but I think a solution could be to assign VBA code to the button's click event that calls the Python script.

To do this:

  1. Go to the Developer tab (Developer tab?!) -> Click 'Visual Basic'

  2. At the top, select 'Insert' -> 'Module'

  3. Create a Public Sub MySubName() in the module that calls the Python script.

  4. Right click the button you want to assign the Sub to -> "Assign Macro..." -> choose the Sub's name.

And that should be it, assuming you know how to call Python from VBA.

How do I assign an xlwings function to a button, Create a Public Sub MySubName() in the module that calls the Python script. The xlwings add-in is the preferred way to be able to use the Run main button, RunPython or UDFs. Note that you don’t need an add-in if you just want to manipulate Excel from Python via xlwings. Note that you don’t need an add-in if you just want to manipulate Excel from Python via xlwings.

After adding the excel add-in to VBA, insert a new module (insert->module) and write the following code. Then, create a button under the developer tab, right click on the button, and click assign macro. Then find the macro you wrote called Button.

Sub Button()
    RunPython("import filename")
End Sub

User Defined Functions (UDFs), When I create a module under xlwings to call a Python script, how do I assign it to a button on excel? Trying to assign a macros to a button seems to only provide  After clicking on Import Python UDFs, you can then use this macro by executing it via Alt + F8 or by binding it e.g. to a button. To to the latter, make sure you have the Developer tab selected under File > Options > Customize Ribbon. Then, under the Developer tab, you can insert a button via Insert > Form Controls.

To write Excel macros in Python that are available for all workbooks, you can use PyXLL.

See the following link to the docs for details of how to expose Python functions as macros and call them from Excel.

https://www.pyxll.com/docs/userguide/macros.html#calling-macros-from-excel

User Defined Functions (UDFs), This tutorial gets you quickly started on how to write User Defined Functions. After drawing the button, you will be prompted to assign a macro to it and you can​  Replace VBA with Python, on-demand webinar. Call Python functions from VBA in other office apps (e.g. MS Access) (Win only) (8:24)

UDF Tutorial, This functionality is currently only available on Windows. After drawing the button, you will be prompted to assign a macro to it and you can select my_macro . After clicking on Import Python UDFs, you can then use this macro by executing it via Alt + F8 or by binding it e.g. to a button. To to the latter, make sure you have the Developer tab selected under File > Options > Customize Ribbon. Then, under the Developer tab, you can insert a button via Insert > Form Controls.

Quickstart, This tutorial gets you quickly started on how to write User Defined Functions. After drawing the button, you will be prompted to assign a macro to it and you can​  Hi. I've spent a couple days already trying to figure out how to assign a function in a module to a button on a worksheet. I don't know VBA but i looked around trying to understand how to call the function from a subroutine so I could assign it to a form control button. Then I tried to do the same with and ActiveX button, same result.

VBA: Calling Python from Excel, You can call Python functions either by clicking the Run button (new in v0.16) in the add-in or from VBA using the RunPython function: The Run button expects a  xlwings quickstart testproject does also not yield success, i. e. i cannot import functions there either. (I would like to use this for work and I do not have admin rights on this pc, on my personal laptop at home everything works for some reason)