Writing browser specific hack in Less (for <IE9)

how to write css for safari browser only
which is the right way of declaring browser specific css for an element mcq
browser specific css for ie
how to write css for different browsers
css hack for mac chrome only
browser specific css chrome
browser hack
css hack for ie all versions

I want to do something like this (Source - CSS Tricks Article):

#veinte { color/*\**/: blue\9; }

in Less for IE7 and IE8 but it gives errors.

The below works:

#diecinueve { color: blue\9; } 

but there are some elements that I dont want to be called in IE9. e.g. I have something in IE9 with :before elements but because IE8 doesnt support it, I want to give it a padding only in IE8.

But this

#veinte { color/*\**/: blue\9; }

gives errors in Less. I tried this

#veinte { color~"/*\**/": blue\9; }

but that also doesnt work. Does anyone know how to do this in Less?


Are you including Modernizr or another shiv script that adds classes directly to the HTML element?

Thus something like this:

.selector {  
  ...rules...  

  .lte8 & {  
    ... < IE9 styles ...  
  }  
}  

Might suit your needs. (see: nesting selectors, using the &)

Otherwise, since you're being hacky anyway, why not just reference a different .less compiled output sheet in a conditional comment?

Browser specific hacks for Frontend developers, I learned some browser specific hacks during my journey and I thought it's a good idea to share them It is as simple as you write your simple CSS code, just pick the hack you want. [if lte IE 9]> Internet Explorer 9 or less <! Introduction to Browser-Specific CSS Hacks. By the main problem with using CSS has been a lack of browser support. This is no longer the case, as version 5 browsers, which all provide good


Property name interpolation is possible with Less v1.6.0 and above. Hence this hack can be implemented as shown below:

@hack: ~"/*\**/";
#veinte { 
    color@{hack}: blue\9; 
}

Compiled CSS:

#veinte {
    color/*\**/: blue\9;
}

Browser Specific Hacks, You may write comments in Markdown thanks to Jetpack Markdown. This is the best way to post any code, inline like `<div>this</div>` or multiline  At the time of this writing, Firefox 3 seems immune to any browser-specific hack. We may have missed something, though. If you know of a way to target Firefox 3, be sure to add it .


You can try this one: background-position:~"-150px 0px\9" width:~"300px\9";

example:

.test{
    width:~"300px\9";
}

Writing browser specific hack in Less (for <IE9) - css - html, I want to do something like this (Source - CSS Tricks Article): #veinte { color/*\**/: blue\9; } in Less for IE7 and IE8 but it gives errors. The below works:  Just found out this specific hack for chrome!!! because Webkit on Mac is making fonts sometimes a bit thinner – but on Retina Displays the thinner font is looking fine! /* non Retina display, Chrome only */ @media only (max-resolution: 192dpi) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) { h1{ font-weight: 400 !important; } }


Writing browser specific hack in Less (for <IE9), Property name interpolation is possible with Less v1.6.0 and above. Hence this hack can be implemented as shown below: @hack: ~"/*\**/"  Here’s a collection of media queries that will allow you to do that in pure CSS3 code, without a single line of JavaScript code: most of them come from the browserhacks.com web site, which is an excellent resource of browser-specific CSS and JavaScript hacks for these kind of tasks.


CSS Browser-Specific Hacks, It can be useful to fix some weird browser specific bug, but in most cases you should fix your CSS. Mozilla. Firefox - Any Firefox browser hack. @-  CSS hacks to target specific browsers stay where the rest of your styles are, but they certainly don’t validate. For sometime now, the standards community has rallied around conditional stylesheets as a solution to the validation problem.


CSS hack, A CSS hack is a coding technique used to hide or show CSS markup depending on the browser, version number, or capabilities. Browsers have different interpretations of CSS behavior and different levels of most CSS hacks involve writing invalid CSS rules that are interpreted only by specific browsers, or relying on  I’m by no means any sort of web design guru, but I have found over the course of making 25 or so web sites that if there is a difference between Firefox and IE9 and you aren’t being particularly experimental in your use of advanced CSS selectors, it makes sense to check one really basic thing: that your code validates, both html-wise and CSS-wise.