how to prevent scientific notation with Float in swift

swift decimal precision
round in swift

I have the following code :

rangeSlider.minLabel?.text = "\(rangeSlider.lowerValue)"

The label text is 1e+07 but I want to be 100000000.

How should I disable scientific notation ?

Format your number style :

let numberFormatter = NSNumberFormatter()
numberFormatter.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterStyle.DecimalStyle
let finalNumber = numberFormatter.numberFromString("\(rangeSlider.lowerValue)")
print(finalNumber!)

With the conversion of simple 1e+07

let numberFormatter = NSNumberFormatter()
numberFormatter.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterStyle.DecimalStyle
let finalNumber = numberFormatter.numberFromString("\(1e+07)")
print(finalNumber!)

Output :

10000000

Hope this helps.

Format your number style : let numberFormatter = NSNumberFormatter() numberFormatter.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterStyle. How to suppress scientific notation in Pandas Scientific notation isn't helpful when you are trying to make quick comparisons across your DataFrame, and when your values are not that long. However, Pandas will introduce scientific notation by default when the data type is a float.

Another approach is to use String(format:) which is available if you have Foundation imported:

Example:

import Foundation  // this comes with import UIKit or import Cocoa

let f: Float = 1e+07
let str = String(format: "%.0f", f)
print(str)  // 10000000

In your case:

rangeSlider.minLabel?.text = String(format: "%.0f", rangeSlider.lowerValue)

Hi, I have a set of numbers formatted as such - 6.11104586446241e-01 - thatt I want to convert to doubles. In Objective C I'd accomplish this  For standard streams, the floatfieldformat flag is set to defaultfloaton initialization. The precision fieldcan be modified using member precision. Notice that the treatment of the precision fielddiffers between the default floating-point notation and the fixed and scientific notations (see precision).

Solution w/ extension (Swift 4+, Xcode 9)

I've just had the same problem to face. For displaying this kind of numbers in a string, I've created the following extension:

extension Double {

    func toString(decimal: Int = 9) -> String {
        let value = decimal < 0 ? 0 : decimal
        var string = String(format: "%.\(value)f", self)

        while string.last == "0" || string.last == "." {
            if string.last == "." { string = String(string.dropLast()); break}
            string = String(string.dropLast())
        }
        return string
    }
}

Usage example:

var scientificNumber: Double = 1e+06
print(scientificNumber.toString())  // 1000000

scientificNumber = 1e-06
print(scientificNumber.toString())  // 0.000001

scientificNumber = 1e-14
print(scientificNumber.toString())  // 0 (too small for the default tollerance.)
print(scientificNumber.toString(decimal: 15)) // 0.00000000000001

For floats works as well. Just extend Float instead of Double.

rangeSlider.minLabel?.text = "\(rangeSlider.lowerValue)". The label text is 1e 07 but I want to be 100000000. How should I disable scientific notation ? Solution. Solution w/ extension (Swift 4+, Xcode 9) I've just had the same problem to face. For displaying this kind of numbers in a string, I've created the following extension:

Swift 4.2

Disable scientific notation:

let number = NSNumber(value: rangeSlider.lowerValue)
print(number.decimalValue)

rangeSlider.minLabel?.text = "\(number.decimalValue)"

Finally, Swift offers two floating-point types which differ in size and in precision of The underscores are purely syntactic sugar and don't change the literals can be denoted using the scientific e notation for decimal floats. Scientific notation is a kind of short hand, a more convenient way of writing floating point numbers using an optional exponent and given that I’ve mentioned it here, it won’t surprise you that we also have the option of using this notation in Swift. To write decimal floating point literals in scientific notation we use an upper or lowercase letter e to separate the base value from the exponent.

Apple Swift version 3.0.1 (swiftlang-800.0.58.6 clang-800.0.42.1) of a Double incorrectly uses scientific notation for large integers that are still within then, you would like to see the following for Float, Double, and Float80? I have a column with an extremely large set of values (>21k), with an undetermined amount of decimal places, some sample data (FLOAT) that exists: 6.46 0.784 8.05 86.4 2.64 0 2.14 1E-06 14.81 3.45 0.87243 0 1.12279 0 21.41 0.6243 I would like to return all values as shown EXCEPT '1E-06' should be .0

Hello, I was getting ready for a "What's new in Swift 5" meetup presentation and noodling around with string interpolation. Inspired by Michael  You could write a disp_no_scientific function that queried the existing format setting, and activated g format, and then returned to the previous format. However, as noted by Titus, format g does use scientific notation for sufficiently large or small values. There is no format setting for fixed point. If you need that then you should be using

How to take advantage of Swift 4.2, iOS 12, and Xcode 10 to create insanely great Floating-point types can handle huge numbers using scientific notation, but that to avoid conflict with reserved words you should declare complex names or  That's because once the value was stored as a varchar in scientific notation, the precision was lost. You had only an approximate number which converted to float and back to string by using the

Comments
  • For future readers, it's now NumberFormatter and a numberStyle of .decimal. And, obviously, if you're converting a number to a string like the OP asked, you'd use string(from:).
  • This worked for me with negative scientific notation whereas the above from Ashish did not.
  • This solution also works for me, both numbers larger and smaller than 1. The solution by Ashish only works for numbers larger than 1.