Should I Dispose() DataSet and DataTable?

Should I Dispose() DataSet and DataTable?

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DataSet and DataTable both implement IDisposable, so, by conventional best practices, I should call their Dispose() methods.

However, from what I've read so far, DataSet and DataTable don't actually have any unmanaged resources, so Dispose() doesn't actually do much.

Plus, I can't just use using(DataSet myDataSet...) because DataSet has a collection of DataTables.

So, to be safe, I'd need to iterate through myDataSet.Tables, dispose of each of the DataTables, then dispose of the DataSet.

So, is it worth the hassle to call Dispose() on all of my DataSets and DataTables?

Addendum:

For those of you who think that DataSet should be disposed: In general, the pattern for disposing is to use using or try..finally, because you want to guarantee that Dispose() will be called.

However, this gets ugly real fast for a collection. For example, what do you do if one of the calls to Dispose() thrown an exception? Do you swallow it (which is "bad") so that you can continue on to dispose the next element?

Or, do you suggest that I just call myDataSet.Dispose(), and forget about disposing the DataTables in myDataSet.Tables?


Here are a couple of discussions explaining why Dispose is not necessary for a DataSet.

To Dispose or Not to Dispose ?:

The Dispose method in DataSet exists ONLY because of side effect of inheritance-- in other words, it doesn't actually do anything useful in the finalization.

Should Dispose be called on DataTable and DataSet objects? includes some explanation from an MVP:

The system.data namespace (ADONET) does not contain unmanaged resources. Therefore there is no need to dispose any of those as long as you have not added yourself something special to it.

Understanding the Dispose method and datasets? has a with comment from authority Scott Allen:

In pratice we rarely Dispose a DataSet because it offers little benefit"

So, the consensus there is that there is currently no good reason to call Dispose on a DataSet.

Datatable.Dispose() will make it remove from memory?, So use of Dispose()method has no more significance. Conclusion: It is not necessary to call Dispose() on Datasets. Calling the Clear() can also be appropriate. Dataset is a disconnected managed object. Dispose() is typically called to release unmanaged resources such as file-pointers, streams etc. In most cases, such classes also expose a Close()method that is more appropriate for them. Dataset class is being inherited from the MarshalByValueComponent. This implements the IDisposable interface as it is a component. The …


Is it necessary to call Dispose() on a Dataset?, DataSet and DataTable both implement IDisposable, so, by conventional best practices, I should call their Dispose() methods. However, from what I've read so​  DataSet and DataTable both implement IDisposable, so, by conventional best practices, I should call their Dispose() methods. However, from what I've read so far, DataSet and DataTable don't actually have any unmanaged resources, so Dispose() doesn't actually do much.


You should assume it does something useful and call Dispose even if it does nothing in current . NET Framework incarnations, there's no guarantee it will stay that way in future versions leading to inefficient resource usage.

Should I Dispose() DataSet and DataTable?, Dispose will only get rid of unmanaged resources and the DataTable can try to use the datatable.clear() method or set datatable as null. http://stackoverflow.​com/questions/913228/should-i-dispose-dataset-and-datatable. This is topic has been discussed thoroughly here: Should I Dispose() DataSet and DataTable?. In short, if you really want to follow the style cop rules then you can't use DataTable as a return type. You must use some other object to return your data and wrap the DataTable object in a using statement.


Even if object has no unmanaged resources, disposing might help GC by breaking object graphs. In general, if object implements IDisposable then Dispose() should be called.

Whether Dispose() actually does something or not depends on given class. In case of DataSet, Dispose() implementation is inherited from MarshalByValueComponent. It removes itself from container and calls Disposed event. The source code is below (disassembled with .NET Reflector):

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (disposing)
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            if ((this.site != null) && (this.site.Container != null))
            {
                this.site.Container.Remove(this);
            }
            if (this.events != null)
            {
                EventHandler handler = (EventHandler) this.events[EventDisposed];
                if (handler != null)
                {
                    handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

IDispose Disposing Datatable object, Difference between Finalize() and Dispose() methods in . Provision of DataRelation Objects: In DataSet, DataTable objects can be related to each other with  Sort of. IDisposable is a contract that mean call Dispose when done with the instance and you are safe if you do. However, some people might argue that Dispose does nothing on certain classes such as DataTable which might even be true at the present time. Yet the implementation of Dispose might change for such a class in the future -


Do you create the DataTables yourself? Because iterating through the children of any Object (as in DataSet.Tables) is usually not needed, as it's the job of the Parent to dispose all it's child members.

Generally, the rule is: If you created it and it implements IDisposable, Dispose it. If you did NOT create it, then do NOT dispose it, that's the job of the parent object. But each object may have special rules, check the Documentation.

For .net 3.5, it explicitly says "Dispose it when not using anymore", so that's what I would do.

Difference between DataTable and DataSet, https://docs.microsoft.com › › .NET › .NET API browser › System.Data DataSet and DataTable both implement IDisposable, so, by conventional best practices, I should call their Dispose() methods. However, from what I've read so far, DataSet and DataTable don't actually have any unmanaged resources, so Dispose() doesn't actually do much.


https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/4eb, The DataSet consists of a collection of DataTable objects that you can relate to Dispose(). Releases all resources used by the MarshalByValueComponent. ActiveOldestVotes. 10. It is highly recommended to Dispose IDisposable objects manually. There is a nice syntax shortcut for this: using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connstring))using (SqlCommand com = new SqlCommand())using (SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter()){ com.Connection = con; //etc..


DataSet Class (System.Data), Dispose(); E Figure 3.16 Example using DataSet. In section is initialized and the Clear() method is called to clean up the DataSet object before it can be filled. The DataSet, which is an in-memory cache of data retrieved from a data source, is a major component of the ADO.NET architecture. The DataSet consists of a collection of DataTable objects that you can relate to each other with DataRelation objects. You can also enforce data integrity in the DataSet by using the UniqueConstraint and


Practical Database Programming With Visual C#.NET, Collect(). If even with that the memory keeps increasing, then your problem If you clear the list without disposing the objects, those files will still be In the case of the DataTable, all datatable rows will still be in memory until  DataTable object to DataSet collection of DataTabel objects I have a method which returns a datatable object and I need to pass that object to one of my datatables in the DataSet collection. For some reason I am not able to assign the datatable to the dataset collection. Here is some of the code I am using.