How do I make sure a 1-D array is valid using a while statement?

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I am trying to check that each integer (Array) is valid (Between 0 and 30). A problem occurs as the line telling the user the score is invalid runs but the variable doesn't seem to be False, and I don't know why, can anyone fix this?

Here is the code in question:

while valid_score == True and program_running == True:
      for counter in range(0,6):
            print("How mant points did player", counter + 1 ,"earn?") 
            score_earned[counter] = int(input())

            if score_earned[counter] < 0 or score_earned[counter] > 30: 
                  print("That value was invalid as it was lower than 0 or `above 30!")`
                  valid_score = False

            else:
                  valid_score = True


            total_score = score_earned[counter] + total_score

      valid_score = False

You could just prevent any points attempted to be entered that are not in the range you desire, before passing those values to your dictionary. You could do this with a while loop that will only accept that range of points

score_earned = {}  
players = 5

for i in range(1, players +1):
    points = -1
    while points < 0 or points > 30:
        try:
            points = int(input('Enter points for player {} between 0 and 30: '.format(i)))
        except ValueError:
            print('Please enter points between 0 and 30')
    score_earned[i] = points

total_score = sum(score_earned.values())
print('The total score is: {}'.format(total_score))

An array can be of any type, For example: int , float , char etc. known as a one-​dimensional array or 1-D array, while an array of two dimensions is known as Sure indexes 5 , 10 and -1 are not valid but C compiler will not show any error The following program uses for loop to take input and print elements of a 1-D array. Arrays can be single or multidimensional. The number of subscript or index determines the dimensions of the array. An array of one dimension is known as a one-dimensional array or 1-D array, while an array of two dimensions is known as a two-dimensional array or 2-D array. Let’s start with a one-dimensional array. One-dimensional array.


My guess is you've misunderstood how the loops work

while valid_score == True and program_running == True: # <-- This will not break while running inner loop
      for counter in range(0,6): # <-- this loops independently
            ....

My suggestion is to adjust your code to look like this:

  for counter in range(0,6):
        print("How mant points did player", counter + 1 ,"earn?") 
        score_earned[counter] = int(input())

        if score_earned[counter] < 0 or score_earned[counter] > 30: 
              print("That value was invalid as it was lower than 0 or `above 30!")`
              valid_score = False
              break # <-- this ends the loop early

        else:
              valid_score = True

        total_score = score_earned[counter] + total_score
        if not program_running == True:
              break

In do while loop first the statements in the body are executed then the condition of do while loop contains only one statement, then braces ( {} ) can be omitted. print numbers between 1 and 100 which are multiple of 3 using the do while loop: As you probably know that factorial is only valid for 0 and positive numbers. The ARRAY statement defines a set of elements that you plan to process as a group. You refer to elements of the array by the array name and subscript. Because you usually want to process more than one element in an array, arrays are often referenced within DO groups.


I went ahead and made a working version of your code. You seem to be making several mistakes. This should help clear up your misconceptions. Consider adding a type() check incase someone decides to enter a string.

score_earned = {} #python dictionary is an associative array
counter = 1
valid_score = True

while valid_score == True: #and program_running == True: #program_running variable is never assigned
    print("How mant points did player", counter, "earn?") 
    score_earned[counter] = int(input())

    if score_earned[counter] < 0 or score_earned[counter] > 30: 
        print("That value was invalid as it was lower than 0 or above 30!")
        valid_score = False

    total_score = score_earned[counter] + total_score #currently doing nothing with total_score
    counter += 1

While loop in C programming with example: Learn how to use while loop in C programs with the while (condition test) { //Statements to be executed repeatedly // Increment (++) or #include <stdio.h> int main() { int count=1; while (count <= 4) { printf("%d ", count); count++; } return 0; } The following scenarios are valid : The code must create the array explicitly and assign it to anArray. Creating an Array You create an array explicitly using Java's new operator. The next statement in the sample program allocates an array with enough memory for ten integer elements and assigns the array to the variable anArray declared earlier.


The purpose of the for loop is somewhat confusing since you are repeatedly looping between 0 and 6, when you probably are just wanting to use a while loop only and increment a counter value while it is less then 6.

I wrote up this example which converted what I could understand from the logic of your code to only one while statement:

counter = 0
valid_score = True
program_running = True

while valid_score and counter < 6 and program_running:
    print("How mant points did player", counter + 1 ,"earn?") 
    score_earned[counter] = int(input())

    if score_earned[counter] < 0 or score_earned[counter] > 30: 
        print("That value was invalid as it was lower than 0 or `above 30!")`
        valid_score = False

    total_score += score_earned[counter]  # Not sure you want to add to the total score when invalid
                                          # Probably better to add to total score in else statement
    counter += 1  # Increment counter variable keeping track of number of iterations

You proabably can modify this some to match your expected result, but this should help you understand how to use a while loop and counter better.

i n Option Base 1 has no effect on the dimensions of the errey returned by the DimArrey function. Increasing the dimension of an array while using the keyword Preserve For example, rfjjj the statement "ReDim a(2 To 4, 5)" will be valid. Just read using the Scanner and print out the results. Don't even think about arrays. Next add loops to both programs. Once both of these programs work perfectly, and you understand how they work and why they behave the way they do, then and only then should you combine the concepts into "Read using a Scanner and put the results into an array."


valid\n"; 7 printf "The average is %d. 3 The foreach loop will iterate through each grade in the list, one at a time until it reaches the end of the list. 4 The inner while loop will be used to test the validity of each grade coming from the with a value of less than 0 or greater than 100, the while loop block will be valid array. a) The break statement causes an immediate exit from a while, for, do. while or if . else statement. b) The continue statement is designed for use with the while, for, do while or switch statements. c) an equivalent while statement for any for statement can always be formed.


If you did not, i would always be equal to 1 , the condition would always be true, and Whenever you write a while loop, make sure that the variable you use in your How do we iterate over all the values of a multi-dimensional sequence? not a valid number while not valid_number(age): # now we can use the condition​  I'm trying to make an invalid input turn around and request a valid input rather than just ending the program, but neither IF nor WHILE loops seem to do the job. Basically I want the program to demand a valid input (nubmer beween 1 and 10) if the user enters letters or nothing at all. I can get this to happen once, but not continually.


In this case, the loop test must ensure that the body is not performed when the index is equal to array.length - 1. Use an if statement inside the loop to control the​  It would not be appropriate, however, to use an array index that is outside the bounds of the valid array indices: list[5] = 10; // bad statement, since your valid indices are 0 - 4. The statement above is syntactically legal, however. It is the programmer's job to make sure that out of bounds indices are not used.