Should I be adding the Django migration files in the .gitignore file?

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Should I be adding the Django migration files in the .gitignore file?

I've recently been getting a lot of git issues due to migration conflicts and was wondering if I should be marking migration files as ignore.

If so, how would I go about adding all of the migrations that I have in my apps, and adding them to the .gitignore file?


Quoting from the Django migrations documentation:

The migration files for each app live in a "migrations" directory inside of that app, and are designed to be committed to, and distributed as part of, its codebase. You should be making them once on your development machine and then running the same migrations on your colleagues’ machines, your staging machines, and eventually your production machines.

If you follow this process, you shouldn't be getting any merge conflicts in the migration files.

When merging version control branches, you still may encounter a situation where you have multiple migrations based on the same parent migration, e.g. if to different developers introduced a migration concurrently. One way of resolving this situation is to introduce a _merge_migration_. Often this can be done automatically with the command

./manage.py makemigrations --merge

which will introduce a new migration that depends on all current head migrations. Of course this only works when there is no conflict between the head migrations, in which case you will have to resolve the problem manually.


Given that some people here suggested that you shouldn't commit your migrations to version control, I'd like to expand on the reasons why you actually should do so.

First, you need a record of the migrations applied to your production systems. If you deploy changes to production and want to migrate the database, you need a description of the current state. You can create a separate backup of the migrations applied to each production database, but this seems unnecessarily cumbersome.

Second, migrations often contain custom, handwritten code. It's not always possible to automatically generate them with ./manage.py makemigrations.

Third, migrations should be included in code review. They are significant changes to your production system, and there are lots of things that can go wrong with them.

So in short, if you care about your production data, please check your migrations into version control.

Gitignore for a Django project, If you are using Git for version control, you need a Gitignore file to ignore all files that don't Therefore, it's unnecessary to add those to your repository. If you wouldn't commit the migration files, all fields would be True since the production  Quoting from the Django migrations documentation: The migration files for each app live in a “migrations” directory inside of that app, and are designed to be committed to, and distributed as part of, its codebase. You should be making them once on your development machine


You can follow the below process.

You can run makemigrations locally and this creates the migration file. Commit this new migration file to repo.

In my opinion you should not run makemigrations in production at all. You can run migrate in production and you will see the migrations are applied from the migration file that you committed from local. This way you can avoid all conflicts.

IN LOCAL ENV, to create the migration files,

python manage.py makemigrations 
python manage.py migrate

Now commit these newly created files, something like below.

git add app/migrations/...
git commit -m 'add migration files' app/migrations/...

IN PRODUCTION ENV, run only the below command.

python manage.py migrate

Include migrations in Git/GitHub ? : django, I have been working on my first serious Django project for a few months now and I if you don't add the migrations to git, especially after you have data in your db​? The migrations should be a description from how to get from one database state can be helpful while preparing a design document, that'd be really nice. At the moment I feel like there's a lot of files created in local development that needs to be added to .gitignore. I found this .gitignore file on github however I still feel it's missing some things, for example it doesn't seem to remove files from each migrations folders.


Quote from the 2018 docs, Django 2.0. (two separate commands = makemigrations and migrate)

The reason that there are separate commands to make and apply migrations is because you’ll commit migrations to your version control system and ship them with your app; they not only make your development easier, they’re also useable by other developers and in production.

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/2.0/intro/tutorial02/

Should I be adding the Django migration files in the .gitignore file?, gitignore file? I've recently been getting a lot of git issues due to migration conflicts and was wondering if I should be marking migration files as  Whilst many migrations in Django are generated code, this isn't always the case. Possible the most common place you'll find a migration written by hand is when someone has made a data migration. In short, commit the migration .py files but exclude all .pyc files.


Feels like you'd need to adjust your git workflow, instead of ignoring conflicts.

Ideally, every new feature is developed in a different branch, and merged back with a pull request.

PR cannot be merged if there's a conflict, therefore who needs to merge his feature needs to resolve the conflict, migrations included.

Migrations | Django documentation, gitignore file that we created in this recipe will ignore the Python-compiled files, local settings, collected static files, temporary directory for uploads, and media  My team has had the Django migration files in .gitignore , and so hasn't been committing these files. Instead we've been making migrations on our production server. We discovered that this is not the recommended practice (upon encountering Should I be adding the Django migration files in


I can't imagine why you would be getting conflicts, unless you're editing the migrations somehow? That usually ends badly - if someone misses some intermediate commits then they won't be upgrading from the correct version, and their copy of the database will be corrupted.

The process that I follow is pretty simple - whenever you change the models for an app, you also commit a migration, and then that migration doesn't change - if you need something different in the model, then you change the model and commit a new migration alongside your changes.

In greenfield projects, you can often delete the migrations and start over from scratch with a 0001_ migration when you release, but if you have production code, then you can't (though you can squash migrations down into one).

Creating the Git ignore file, In your project, you can find your migration files (.py files) inside the migrations folder. In every installed app defined in your settings file, you will find each migration that branch_1, where one developer added an “address” field to the After the GIT merge, I have on branch_2 my migrations and also  Next to that, Django recommends including migration files as they are part of the code base: The migration files for each app live in a “migrations” directory inside of that app, and are designed to be committed to, and distributed as part of, its codebase.


Django Migrations and How to Manage Conflicts, We'll call this Python code a migration file. These migration files are safely stored in your git repository, so your Git doesn't know which migration your database should be at. Life goes on and Sparkles now adds Migration Files 4 and 5, applies the migrations locally and pushes the files to upstream. The migrations should be a description from how to get from one database state (say v1) to another (say v2) - Even though you are generating them locally, they will still describe the changes that you need to go though in order to move between versions.


Database Migrations (“You know nothing, Version Control.”), In my Django project, I have many migrations directory, I want to add to my You can add "**/migrations/*" to your .gitignore file, this will add all folders and it's You have to add the files in the .gitignore, and then delete them from the git repo​  If you want to ignore a file that you've committed in the past, you'll need to delete the file from your repository and then add a .gitignore rule for it. Using the --cached option with git rm means that the file will be deleted from your repository, but will remain in your working directory as an ignored file.


How to add all of the migrations/ to git .gitignore file in django , I have a Django project on Git I am not very confortable with Git I have juste Normally, I have excluded these files from being tracked in my .gitignore file but seems to rm -r --cached . git add . git commit -m ".gitignore fix" files: unblind/​migrations/__pycache__/0003_auto_20200124_1007.cpython-37. This will add the .gitignore file will all the defaults set for things that should be ignored. You could add the file manually, but then you would not get the nice set of default values. If you do decide to add the file manually this repo contains all the defaults that should be ignored for a project using .NET/Visual Studio.