I want to have permission to write to a new file in a subdirectory in python, without using sudo

cannot create directory permission denied ubuntu
permission denied linux folder
mkdir cannot create directory permission denied centos
permission denied writing to file vs code
permission denied linux file
circleci mkdir permission denied
cannot create directory permission denied windows
docker mkdir permission denied windows

It's easy to find people asking how to do this, but there is never an answer that applies to me from what I can tell. I simply want to create permissions, in generality, to write to new files in a subdirectory. Within python I call

filename = 'dfs_err_results/err_results_st'+str(station_id)
file = open(filename,'w')
pickle.dump(results, file)
file.close()

but it fails at open() with IOError: [Errno 13] Permission denied: 'dfs_err_results/err_results_st5'. If I enter with sudo python, that error doesn't occur, but it's annoying to have to remember that and to have to check progress within sudo ps x where there are a ton of processes.

Am I correct there's no way to alter the subdirectory for future files using chmod? Or no way to have lines of code within the python script that set the permissions?

Thanks!

Yes it does execute command with sudo. For exmaple, before openning the file you can change its write permission. Do whatever you need and change permission back. I don't have linux by hand at this moment, by try something like this:

subprocess.call(['/usr/bin/sudo', 'chmod', '777', filename])
with open(filename) as file:
    pickle.dump(results, file)

Cognitive Radio Communications and Networks: Principles and Practice, I want to have permission to write to a new file in a subdirectory in python, If I enter with sudo python , that error doesn't occur, but it's annoying to have to Of course, if there was a way to get elevated privileges without authentication, that  In Python, there is no need for importing external library to read and write files. Python provides an inbuilt function for creating, writing and reading files. With Python you can create a .text files (guru99.txt) by using the code, we have demonstrated here how you can do this. We declared the variable f to open a file named guru99.txt.

This is mostly contributed by xmp but it does require one more line to create the file:

subprocess.call(['/usr/bin/sudo', 'touch', filename])
subprocess.call(['/usr/bin/sudo', 'chmod', '777', filename])
file = open(filename,'w')
pickle.dump(results, file)
file.close()

Thanks for the help!

Python in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference, There are three sets of permissions to be set: the owner's permissions, the There are three levels of permission: read (r), write (w), and execute (x). when setting a Python file to have execute permissions, such as 'sudo chmod a After installing new software, this command has to be run or the new files will not be found. After making changes to /etc/sudoers file you may want to inspect that it really does what you want by calling sudo -l -U pi command. Of course you can create different accounts and configure sudoers giving them access to different commands.

That's what worked for me:

os.chmod(filename, stat.S_IRWXO | stat.S_IRWXG | stat.S_IRWXU)
with open(filename, 'w') as f:
     pickle.dump(i, f)

this gives full permissions for everything you can choose the permissions you want by changing the stat mode: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/os_chmod.htm

Permission Denied When Creating Directory or Writing a File , If you run make without first running ./configure, make implicitly runs . When make finishes, you should test that the Python you have just built works as For example, if you want a private installation of Python in subdirectory py24 of your run: $ make install The user running make install must have write permissions on  Of course, if there was a way to get elevated privileges without authentication, that would be a big flaw. You should first design your access rights, then there are a lot of solutions to implement what you need. The os module in python provides functions to set permissions on files (but of course only the ones your can access).

UNIX: The Textbook, Third Edition, If you receive an error telling you that you do not have permissions to a directory or to write a file to a directory then this is likely an indication that These users only have write permissions in their $HOME folders and places like /​tmp . Build Fails with "Too long with no output (exceeded 10m0s): context  Python Directory. If there are a large number of files to handle in our Python program, we can arrange our code within different directories to make things more manageable.. A directory or folder is a collection of files and subdirectories.

Create file in folder: permission denied, 22. and delete files related to the project, which are located in the Project directory in Bob's They wish to do this project without contacting the system administrator to request new groups, group membership changes, sudo changes, etc. When the project is over, Bob will remove the modify permissions on his home and the  In order to use sudo you first need to configure the sudoers file. The sudoers file is located at /etc/sudoers. And you should not edit it directly, you need to use the visudo command. Once you enter visudo command, you will see something like this: # /etc/sudoers # # This file MUST be edited with the 'visudo' command as root. # # See the man page for details on how to write a sudoers file.

Problem with file permission, when I upload a file cannot upload the , First of all you have to know that the default permission of directories in sudo chmod -R 777 /home/sixven/camp_sms/inputs But like this the user:sixven can't write in this folder again and thus you may moving in a circular infinite loop. For example, if you have permission to read a file, you can run it as Python code because you’re actually executing Python first. Python reads the file, so it’s Python’s permissions that matter. You need the execute permission only if the file is a self-contained app. Confused? Probably.

Comments
  • There was a similar topic, take a look if it helps stackoverflow.com/questions/5191878/…
  • I'm sorry can you expand on that? I'm trying to use this import subprocess / subprocess.call(["/usr/bin/sudo", "/usr/bin/id"]) function but I don't think I'm understanding it. This is sending it to execute shell commands under sudo right? And then return to my python function as a normal user? But how do I do this file opening in python within that command? Do I need to make another whole file that I'm sending arguments to?
  • This isn't really a Python question but rather a Linux question. You should ask on ServerFault or SuperUser. Of course, if there was a way to get elevated privileges without authentication, that would be a big flaw. You should first design your access rights, then there are a lot of solutions to implement what you need. The os module in python provides functions to set permissions on files (but of course only the ones your can access).
  • I think it's a Python question, too, given that the answer lies within the subprocess module.
  • I think this only works if the file already exists, but I want it to be able to create a new one the way file.open(name,'w') usually does. And having it use a text editor like vim to do so breaks the python script. Is there a way to create a file without adding any content?
  • Now if only I could suppress the output '0's that come along with it in Python 2.7. These suggestions aren't compatible and browsing other Popen suggestions hasn't worked so far.