Connecting to localhost:8080 using Google Chrome

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I'm currently developing a card game using node.js and gulp, and suddendly Chrome stopped to find localhost:8080. After some research, some people had the same problem and solved it by disabling "Built-in Asynchronous DNS" in chrome://flags, however, this flag seems not to exist anymore.

When a friend of mine launch the same code also with gulp and with the same version of Chrome, it works. Any idea ?


In the chrome url bar type "chrome://net-internals/#hsts" and delete the localhost domain, by typing "localhost" into the Delete Domain text box.

Type "localhost" into the Query Domain text box and if it says "Not found" than it was successful.

Chrome cannot connect to http://localhost:8080 but http://127.0.0.1 , Maybe this is an IPv4 / IPv6 issue. If your server only listens on IPv4 and you connect to localhost, it could be that it uses the IPv6 address and  I am working on a Chrome extension that tracks time, and uses Google App Engine for the backend. For testing, I'm trying to connect a local version of the extension to a local version of the App Engine app.


I was running into this issue as well. None of the other answers worked for me.

What did work for me was simply changing the port of my localhost to 3000.

Using Webpack:

// webpack.config.js 

module.exports = {
  ...
  devServer: {
    port: 3000,
  },
  ...
};

Access Local Servers | Tools for Web Developers, Hi Rob,. When you use the Linux (Beta) terminal you're effectively acting on a completely separate computer from your Chromebook. Sure, that  I'm currently developing a card game using node.js and gulp, and suddendly Chrome stopped to find localhost:8080. After some research, some people had the same problem and solved it by disabling "Built-in Asynchronous DNS" in chrome://flags, however, this flag seems not to exist anymore.


I am not very experienced in web developing and this might not be a very good answer. I am new to stackoverflow, so I cannot add any comments. That is why I post this as an answer to share my experiences.

One possible scenario is that you are already running an application that uses port 8080. As an example, if I use WAMP server to host a web page in port 8080 and Node.js to run a REST API in port 8080, one application might run on localhost:8080 and other on 127.0.0.1:8080 even though they are the same and the webpage will not be able to use the REST API because the hosts do not match. In fact, this happened to me while ago and I could not find a solution for it. So I had to serve the web page through Node.js. Hope this answer is helpful.

Fails to connect to http://localhost:8016 , I finally found a solution to this. Go to chrome://flags and set "Built-in Asynchronous DNS" to "Disabled", then restart the browser. This allows all local domains to  Sign in to get your bookmarks, history, passwords, and other settings on all your devices. Learn more. Choose what to sync. Sign in with a different account. One Google Account for everything Google.


Google Chrome can't access localhost domains, Open command prompt as Administrator and type these two commands one by one: netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name="TCP Port 80" dir=in action=allow  I run attempt to debug but Google Chrome pops up and says " localhost refused to connect." How do I connect?/ set up the local host for this? I know this is probably silly, I've been trying really hard but nothing has worked!


Chrome Localhost Connection Refused, 2) built-in DNS found 127.0.0.1 in /etc/hosts and returns [127.0.0.1] 3) chrome cannot DNS fixes the issue using AppEngine at localhost:8080. Google Chrome could not connect to localhost:9100" With the built-in DNS flag  Step 1, Connect your Chromecast to your television. To use Google Chrome on your television, you’ll need have a Chromecast already hooked up to your television. This method will work for the Windows, Mac, and ChromeOS versions of the browser.Step 2, Connect to the same Wi-Fi network as the Chromecast. If your computer is not already connected to Wi-Fi, connect now.[1] X Research sourceStep 3, Open Chrome on your computer. Chrome has a built-in “Cast” feature that allows you to send a


chromium, JavaScript in the fetched page sets up a websocket connection 3. Connection: Upgrade Host: localhost:8080 Origin: http://localhost:8080 Sec-WebSocket-Key:  You can use your camera and microphone for sites in Chrome. Open Chrome . Go to a site that wants to use your microphone and camera. When prompted, choose Allow or Block. Allowed sites: Sites can start to record when you're on the site. If you're using a different Chrome tab or a different app, a site can't start recording.