Use subprocess to send a password

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python send password to command line

I'm attempting to use the python subprocess module to log in to a secure ftp site and then grab a file. However I keep getting hung up on just trying to send the password when it is requested. I so far have the following code:

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

proc = Popen(['sftp','user@server', 'stop'], stdin=PIPE)
proc.communicate('password')

This still stops at the password prompt. If I enter the password manually it then goes to the ftp site and then enters the password on the command line. I've seen people suggest using pexpect but long story short I need a standard library solution. Is there anyway with subprocess and/or any other stdlib? What am I forgetting above?

Perhaps you should use an expect-like library instead?

For instance Pexpect (example). There are other, similar python libraries as well.

Use subprocess to send a password, I'm attempting to use the python subprocess module to log in to a secure ftp site and then grab a file. However I keep getting hung up on just trying to send the  However I keep getting hung up on just trying to send the password when it is requested. I so far have the following code: from subprocess import Popen, PIPE proc = Popen (['sftp', 'user@server', 'stop'], stdin = PIPE) proc. communicate ('password') This still stops at the password prompt.

Try

proc.stdin.write('yourPassword\n')
proc.stdin.flush()

That should work.

What you describe sounds like stdin=None where the child process inherits the stdin of the parent (your Python program).

Using Subprocess to Interact with Shell Script : learnpython, As you can see, I attempted to use 'ssh_connect.stdin.write('password\n')' but this is not My solution is specific to subprocess as I haven't dealt with ssh. The company that generates the statements sent us a PDF of ALL statements. Use subprocess to send a password I'm attempting to use the python subprocess module to log in to a secure ftp site and then grab a file. However I keep getting hung up on just trying to send the password when it is requested.

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

proc = Popen(['sftp','user@server', 'stop'], stdin=PIPE)
proc.communicate(input='password')

Try with input=‘password’ in communicate, that worked for me.

Piping to STDIN for Sudo Password, I can pipe a password to the sudo command using the following methods: PHP Code: [View]. os.popen('echo password | sudo -S command'). Use an SSH key for authentication, instead of a password. Use sshpass, expect, or a similar tool to automate responding to the password prompt. Use (abuse) the SSH_ASKPASS feature to get ssh to get the password by invoking another command, described here or here, or in some of the answers here.

I would recommend scrapping the subprocess approach and using the paramiko package for sftp access.

subprocess – Work with additional processes, To send data to the standard input channel of the process one time, pass the data to communicate(). This is similar to using popen() with mode 'w'. $ python -u  You could use the /c option in CMD.exe, or perhaps call netsh command without wrapping it in a CMD command. You can perhaps write a batch file that does a part of the job and you could call this batch file with the subprocess module.

Use Paramiko for SFTP. For anything else, this works:

import subprocess

args = ['command-that-requires-password', '-user', 'me']

proc = subprocess.Popen(args, 
                        stdin=subprocess.PIPE, 
                        stdout=subprocess.PIPE, 
                        stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

proc.stdin.write('mypassword\n')
proc.stdin.flush()

stdout, stderr = proc.communicate()
print stdout
print stderr

Python Subprocess - Python Tutorial, The subprocess module enables you to start new applications from your Python program. You can start a process in Python using the Popen function call. to perform ssh connection to a linux server (using username and password) and You can send shell commands directly to the ssh process like so:  The subprocess module enables you to start new applications from your Python program. How cool is that? Related Course: Python Programming Bootcamp: Go from zero to hero. Start a process in Python: You can start a process in Python using the Popen function call. The program below starts the unix program ‘cat’ and the second parameter is the argument.

subprocess - Pass input into stdin for a subprocess, Use timeout instead. Popen.communicate(input=None, timeout=None)¶. Interact with process: Send data to stdin. Read data  The reason why I am using subprocess is because I need the second script to be run using 64-bit Python, while the main script is run in 32-bit Python. It is a driver issue. I did not think that multiprocessing allowed for this. – Mink Mar 13 '13 at 21:39

17.5. subprocess — Subprocess management, The following are code examples for showing how to use subprocess. def check_sudo(self): """ Checks validity of sudo password :return: True if valid False if PIPE) lpr.communicate(pdf.getvalue()) if lpr.returncode != 0: pass. Example 5​  The same way I send the password when prompted, I would like to send system commands once logged in. – Max Jan 26 '11 at 14:43 Samlple code was added to post above. Of course this will work until my_commandX don't change returned prompt, if this happens prompt variable should be changed.

subprocess.Popen Python Example, You can't send a password to ssh without using something like sshpass. Normally people handle this by using public/private keypairs. ie. you create a public key  With subprocess you can suppress the output, which is very handy when you want to run a system call but are not interested about the standard output. It also gives you a way to cleanly integrate shell commands into your scripts while managing input/output in a standard way. You can use subprocess.call return codes to determine the success of

Comments
  • Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2356391/… ?
  • +1 for Pexpect. That is the right solution for interacting with console processes.
  • Is there a stdlib expect module? I need to stick to stdlib.
  • I'd rather not have to keep track of yet another non-standard library for our product since it's to something not super important anyway. However the library is still good from what I understand. From what I've seen there is no stdlib solution to this problem but I'll give you credit for the good library suggestion. I'm probably just gonna have our code call a bash script if anyone stumbles upon this question later and was wondering what I did.
  • -1 because the question specifically asked for a standard Python library solution, not pexpect. Just sayin'.
  • The example link noah.org/wiki/Pexpect#Overview is dead now; I guess the same thing as at pexpect.readthedocs.io/en/stable/examples.html
  • Hm... this still seems to be stopping and asking for the password.
  • You do read stdout of the process in a second thread, don't you? Otherwise, odd things can happen. Also, check whether sftp allows a password from stdin by using echo password | sftp ... from the command line. It's possible that sftp always opens a shell.
  • passwords are not written through standard input as far as I know. Is this code tested?
  • @SebastianGabrielVinci Yes. Most programs put the console in RAW/NOECHO mode while they wait for a password, so you can't see it but they all read from stdin. Some code also checks that stdin is a tty. For those, you need to use a pseudo tty.
  • You should read the 4.th comment on the question of this thread.
  • @user1767754 what specifically are you drawing my attention to? The answer I have provided is closest to the requirements - pure Python.
  • Can you provide some context to explain to the OP why this is a good or helpful answer (especially in relation to the other existing answers)?