Multi-Line Comments in Ruby?

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How can I comment multiple lines in Ruby?

How to write a multi-line comment in Ruby, Not very pretty: [code]=begin This is a multiline comment =end[/code] However it is more common just to use # on every line. Most IDE's provide a keybinding to  Though often forgotten by many Ruby programmers, Ruby does have multi-line comments. A multi-line comment begins with the =begin token and ends with the =end token. These tokens should start at the beginning of the line and be the only thing on the line. Anything between these two tokens is ignored by the Ruby interpreter.

=begin
My 
multiline
comment
here
=end

Ruby - Comments, Ruby Multiline Comments. You can comment multiple lines using =begin and =​end syntax as follows −. Live Demo. #!/usr/bin/ruby -  How to Use Multi-Line Comments in Ruby. In Ruby, we do multiline comments with regular, single-line comments. Some people call these “block comments”. Here’s an example: # aaa # bbb # ccc That’s exactly how to comment out a block of code in ruby. Modern code editors allow you to select a block of code & comment all of it using a keyboard shortcut, so there is no extra effort involved.

Despite the existence of =begin and =end, the normal and a more correct way to comment is to use #'s on each line. If you read the source of any ruby library, you will see that this is the way multi-line comments are done in almost all cases.

Comments for Ruby Code (Usage, Single, and Multi-Line), Here's how to use comments to annotate your Ruby code with an example of single-line and multi-line comments. Multiple lines of text or code can be defined as comments using the Ruby =begin and =end comment markers. These are known as the comment block markers. These are known as the comment block markers. Note: The =begin and =end must be at the beginning of their respective lines, with no empty whitespace preceding them.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

=begin
Between =begin and =end, any number
of lines may be written. All of these
lines are ignored by the Ruby interpreter.
=end

puts "Hello world!"

How To Use Comments in Ruby, Ruby has an alternative syntax for multi-line comments, but it's rarely used. Here's an example: multiline.rb. =begin This is a multi-line comment. Multi line comments are the comments which can be written in the multiple lines, it can be used to make comments for the multiple lines, multiple lines start with =begin and end with =end. So whatever we write inside the =begin and =end block will be considered as the comment section only.

Using either:

=begin
This
is
a
comment
block
=end

or

# This
# is
# a
# comment
# block

are the only two currently supported by rdoc, which is a good reason to use only these I think.

5 Types Of Ruby Comments & How to Use Them Correctly, How to Use Multi-Line Comments in Ruby. In Ruby, we do multiline comments with regular, single-line comments. Some people call these “block comments”. There are two types comments are available in Ruby on Rails. 1.SINGLE- LINE COMMENT. Remarks are lines of explanation inside Ruby code that are overlooked at runtime. A solitary line remark begins with a # character and they reach out from # to the finish of the line as takes after #! /usr/container/ruby - w # This is a solitary line remark. Puts "Hi, Ruby!" 2. MULTIPLE LINE COMMENT

Ruby Language, Multiple-line comments can be added by using =begin and =end syntax (also known as the comment block markers) as follows: #!/usr/bin/ruby -w =begin This is  Multi Line or Block Ruby Comments Multiple lines of text or code can be defined as comments using the Ruby =begin and =end comment markers. These are known as the comment block markers.

Ruby Comments, The Ruby multi line comment is used to comment multiple lines at a time. They are defined with =begin at the starting and =end at the end of the line. Syntax:. Ruby has an alternative syntax for multi-line comments, but it’s rarely used.

Multi Line Comments in Ruby - Finally, I've wanted multi line comments in Ruby forever and I just, thanks to this Stack Overflow post, found out that they exist thanks to =begin and  Ruby - Comments - Comments are lines of annotation within Ruby code that are ignored at runtime. A single line comment starts with # character and they extend from # to the end o

Comments
  • In case anyone falls on this looking for multiline comments in Puppet .pp manifests (which is based on a Ruby-like syntax) you can use c-style block comments /**/
  • It's rather unfortunate that multiline comments in ruby look very much like a block of code. And given the high points awarded to this question (and the accepted answer) the people working on the ruby syntax should clearly think a bit about it.
  • I really prefer using # over them all, mostly because it visually separates the commented lines better than =begin/=end or using the here-to method. And, nice job.
  • It's interesting that this answer makes some flaws in the syntax highlighter obvious.
  • Don't forget that =begin and =end cannot be preceded by any whitespace.
  • And It is not possible to use =begin =end within a method
  • It's important to note that in the above example code, only the first =begin...=end and last block using # are picked up by rdoc when generating documentation.
  • Sure, you could do this. It works. This is incredibly rare. I find it ugly. Maybe I'm stuck in my ways?
  • I've found that if I include a tab before =begin or =end, the comments don't work. The =begin and =end each need to be written at the beginning of each line.
  • you're not alone @DavidJames. I've personally opted to have them all commented out by my editor. CMD+/ or ALT+/ is the convention for most.
  • @DavidJames, what would you do instead? Type a # and space before every single line? It's a lot of keystrokes especially if I start adding line breaks.
  • You might get arguments about the "more correct" part of your statement as they're both valid. I prefer using # because it's more obvious. When commenting out code it's important to make it obvious that's what happened. If you're viewing the code without the benefit of code coloring in an editor using =begin/=end can make it tough to figure out why code is being ignored.