How do I edit a file after I shell to a Docker container?

edit file in docker image
edit file in docker container from host
edit code in docker container
list files in docker container
edit docker image after pull
docker see files inside container
docker vim container
copy file to docker container

I successfully shelled to a Docker container using

docker exec -i -t 69f1711a205e bash

Now I need to edit file and I don't have any editors inside:

root@69f1711a205e:/# nano
bash: nano: command not found
root@69f1711a205e:/# pico
bash: pico: command not found
root@69f1711a205e:/# vi
bash: vi: command not found
root@69f1711a205e:/# vim
bash: vim: command not found
root@69f1711a205e:/# emacs
bash: emacs: command not found
root@69f1711a205e:/#

How do I edit files?

As in the comments, there's no default editor set - strange - the $EDITOR environment variable is empty. You can log in into a container with:

docker exec -it <container> bash

And run:

apt-get update
apt-get install vim

Or use the following Dockerfile:

FROM  confluent/postgres-bw:0.1

RUN ["apt-get", "update"]
RUN ["apt-get", "install", "-y", "vim"]

Docker images are delivered trimmed to the bare minimum - so no editor is installed with the shipped container. That's why there's a need to install it manually.

EDIT

I also encourage you read my post about the topic.

Editing files in a docker container, As in the comments, there's no default editor set - strange - the $EDITOR environment variable is empty. You can log in into a container with: I successfully shelled to a docker container using. docker exec -i -t 69f1711a205e bash. Now I need to edit file and I don't have any editors inside

If you don't want to add an editor just to make a few small changes (e.g., change the Tomcat configuration), you can just use:

docker cp <container>:/path/to/file.ext .

which copies it to your local machine (to your current directory). Then edit the file locally using your favorite editor, and then do a

docker cp file.ext <container>:/path/to/file.ext

to replace the old file.

How do I edit a file after I shell to a Docker container?, docker exec -i -t 69f1711a205e bash. Now I need to edit file and I don't have any editors inside root@69f1711a205e:/# nano bash: nano:  I successfully went inside docker container by using below command: docker exec -i -t 69f1711a205e bash Now I need to edit file and it seems like I don't have any editors inside the container.

You can use cat if it's installed, which will most likely be the case if it's not a bare/raw container. It works in a pinch, and ok when copy+pasting to a proper editor locally.

cat > file
# 1. type in your content
# 2. leave a newline at end of file
# 3. ctrl-c / (better: ctrl-d)
cat file

cat will output each line on receiving a newline. Make sure to add a newline for that last line. ctrl-c sends a SIGINT for cat to exit gracefully. From the comments you see that you can also hit ctrl-d to denote end-of-file ("no more input coming").

Another option is something like infilter which injects a process into the container namespace with some ptrace magic: https://github.com/yadutaf/infilter

How to edit file after I shell to a docker container?, I successfully went inside docker container by using below command: docker exec -i -t 69f1711a205e bash. Now I need to edit file and it seems  docker run python from container. docker. How do I use the python interpreter from the container without having to type docker exec everytime? What about opening a shell in that container instead? docker exec -it <your container id> /bin/bash -l and then from there use python. Also, how do I access the project code in

To keep your Docker images small, don't install unnecessary editors. You can edit the files over SSH from the Docker host to the container:

vim scp://remoteuser@containerip//path/to/document

How do I edit a file after I shell to a Docker container, and I can navigate through my files in Mac. The problem is that when I try to use nano to edit files i receive a: bash: nano: command not found. Open a shell and edit the file from the command line. Remote into the container and make the changes with our editor. This article covers the first method but in practice it is a lot easier and much more convenient to use the second method.

Sometime you must first run the container with root:

docker exec -ti --user root <container-id> /bin/bash

Then in the container, to install Vim or something else:

apt-get install vim

Edit text file inside docker - Docker Desktop for Mac, Noob Question : How to edit files inside a docker container But I'm confused about how I should edit it. I normally use docker exec -it <name> /bin/bash Dev1 has not produced tangible results after many months trying to work through the  Editing files in a docker container might be useful only during development. When you don’t want or even need to build an image, run it and verify it the change introduced has taken the desired effect every single time you add or remove something in Dockerfile. This way you can save some time, but after it’s done,

Noob Question : How to edit files inside a docker container : docker, Here are two easy ways to edit Docker image for your custom purposes. that container, edit the Docker file with the changes needed and recreate the container with the new file. After making changes to the image, only the corresponding From the shell, make the changes in the container as required. edit file in docker container from host (12) It is kind of screwy, but in a pinch you can use sed or awk to make small edits or remove text. Be careful with your regex targets of course and be aware that you're likely root on your container and might have to re-adjust permissions.

How to edit docker image in two ways, The post discusses how to alter a standard docker image pulled from a Public docker image and add a test directory "test_dir" and create a test file "test_fiel" into it. docker run -it --name="centos_test" centos:latest /bin/bash [root@​e121d03b20dc /]#. 3. After the above command is run, you would see the new image  How to open a bash shell inside a running container and get an interactive command prompt. There are actually a number of ways in which you can achieve the goal of opening a shell within a running Docker container. The easiest is shown in the source block below: Run bash and open command prompt in running container.

How to update/add a file in the Docker Image – The Geek Diary, The volumes mount a folder to a path inside the container, the container will then use and/or create the files inside the folder. The wrong way of doing this is docker exec -it container_name bash. Its wrong and its bad but it works. Use nano inside your container to edit your file.

Comments
  • @Opal I use confluent/postgres-bw:0.1
  • @Opal apt-get install vim works. thanks!
  • so why not create the Dockerfile and include apt-get install command and generate your own container? Docker container is designed as this, not your way.
  • docker should install at lease on test editor ,at least vim by default
  • What you need is mounting a volume: docs.docker.com/userguide/dockervolumes
  • I needed to login as a root to get this done docker exec -u 0 -it container_name bash.
  • As with docker, better to install vim-tiny instead, probably.
  • Maybe you could consider not installing an editor in each container you attach to, but rather just once on the docker host machine. As other commentators mentioned you can mount the volume, so you can edit the files that are going to be mounted, or navigate to the container data itself and edit the files in /var/lib/docker/
  • I just wanted to change one configuration from true to false in container. apt-get was not working due to permission issue inside container,so I tried sed -i 's/texttobechanged/textwanted/g' filename . It worked for me.
  • @Igor This should actuallly be the accepted solution as it is the proper way to do it without adding additional packages to your container, while adding packages should be a secondary solution.
  • For Windows platforms, you can use, for example: docker cp <container>:C:\inetpub\wwwroot\Web.config . and docker cp Web.config <container>:C:\inetpub\wwwroot\Web.config.
  • Nice workaround for the testing purpose! I don't recommend doing it in production.
  • And what do you recommend for production? Should people be editing files in a container interactively in production?