SQL- Ignore case while searching for a string

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I have the following data in a Table PriceOrderShipped PriceOrderShippedInbound PriceOrderShippedOutbound In SQL I need to write a query which searches for a string in a table. While searching for a string it should ignore case. For the below mentioned SQL query

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%PriceOrder%' 

gives all the above data, whereas

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%Priceorder%' 

doesn't give.

Eg. when I search for 'PriceOrder' or 'priceOrder' it works but 'priceorder' or 'Priceorder' doesn't work. I have tried with the below query using COLLATE, but its not working. Do let me know where im going wrong.

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE 
COL_NAME COLLATE latin1_general_cs LIKE '%Priceorder%'

Use something like this -

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE UPPER(COL_NAME) LIKE UPPER('%PriceOrder%')

or

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE LOWER(COL_NAME) LIKE LOWER('%PriceOrder%')

Case insensitive SQL SELECT query examples, Case insensitive SQL SELECT: Use upper or lower functions​​ select * from users where lower(first_name) = 'fred'; As you can see, the pattern is to make the field you're searching into uppercase or lowercase, and then make your search string also be uppercase or lowercase to match the SQL function you've used. While searching for a string it should ignore case. For the below-mentioned SQL query. SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%PriceOrder%' gives all the above data, whereas. SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%Priceorder%' doesn't give. Eg. when I search for 'PriceOrder' or 'priceOrder' it works but 'priceorder' or 'Priceorder' doesn't work.

See this similar question and answer to searching with case insensitivity - SQL server ignore case in a where expression

Try using something like:

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME 
FROM myTable 
WHERE COL_NAME COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS LIKE '%priceorder%'

SQL SELECT LIKE (Insensitive casing), . If your database overrides this setting (through the use of an alternate collation), then you'll need to specify what sort of collation to use in your query. Below you’ll find two ways to search an SQL table column for a case insensitive string. Both examples use the % wildcard to give you records that contain the string, rather than equal. Upper or lower. The first example requires you to change the column to upper or lower, then search for your string in the case case. COLLATE.

You should probably use SQL_Latin1_General_Cp1_CI_AS_KI_WI as your collation. The one you specify in your question is explictly case sensitive.

You can see a list of collations here.

SQL server ignore case in a where expression, Try using the below code: SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE UPPER(COL_NAME) LIKE UPPER('%PriceOrder%'). As you can see, the pattern is to make the field you're searching into uppercase or lowercase, and then make your search string also be uppercase or lowercase to match the SQL function you’ve used. This works with all SQL databases I’ve used, including Postgresql, MySQL, and SQL Server.

Like this.

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME iLIKE '%Priceorder%'

In postgresql.

Is SQL syntax case sensitive?, Another way for case-insensitive matching is to use a different “collation”. Although there is an index on LAST_NAME , it is unusable—because the search is  In the default configuration of a SQL Server database, string comparisons are case-insensitive. If your database overrides this setting (through the use of an alternate collation), then you'll need to specify what sort of collation to use in your query.

SQL- Ignore case while searching for a string, Case sensitive example SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE Name collate collation information though from Ben Snaidero from MS SQL Tips. part of a string in an efficient manner AND allow for the optimizer to seek through  after those two statements executed then you may compare the strings and there will be case insensitive.for example you had two strings s1='Apple' and s2='apple', if yow want to compare the two strings before executing the above statements then those two strings will be treated as two different strings but when you compare the strings after the

Case-Insensitive Search in SQL, Ignore case sensitive when searching in mysql db _users WHERE email = '$q' OR username = '$q'"); $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($sql); By default MySQL is not case-sensitive unless you search against a binary string. You can specify a starting position for where to start searching. This means that SQL Server will skip any occurrence that comes before that starting position. However, the results are still reported based on its position within the string (not from the start position). If this sounds confusing, the following example should help:

How to do a case-insensitive LIKE in a case-sensitive database , Since string variables in CockroachDB are case-sensitive, you can use ILIKE in your query to perform the check using case insensitivity, as its  SQL HOME SQL Intro SQL Syntax SQL Select SQL Select Distinct SQL Where SQL And, Or, Not SQL Order By SQL Insert Into SQL Null Values SQL Update SQL Delete SQL Select Top SQL Min and Max SQL Count, Avg, Sum SQL Like SQL Wildcards SQL In SQL Between SQL Aliases SQL Joins SQL Inner Join SQL Left Join SQL Right Join SQL Full Join SQL Self Join SQL

Comments
  • Possible duplicate of SQL server ignore case in a where expression
  • I think you should always compare strings capitalized (UPPER) as best practice. Google "turkish i"
  • Like to know does your answer has any performance issue by converting a column value to UPPER or LOWER case then using the LIKE to search ?
  • Actually you would have to compare both UPPER and LOWER variants because some characters have different representations in upper case but the same representation in lower case. For other characters, the opposite may be true. Java mentions the Georgian alphabet specifically as reason for doing an additional toLowerCase() in its case-insensitive comparison.
  • Unfortunately, this approach causes a full table scan as described in this post: alvinalexander.com/sql/…. An index search can not be applied, as the filtered column is modified by the UPPER/LOWER function.
  • Setting a collation (before creating the index) seems to be the better approach if query performance with upper/lower is not sufficient.
  • it din't work I get SQL query not properly ended before Collate
  • @Miguel-F.. it is working fine but how does it differ from SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%priceorder%' because this is also working fine for me..
  • I would advice using 'SQL_Latin1_General_Cp1_CI_AS_KI_WI' instead. It's not case sensetive for a seach.
  • This question is tagged sql-server so a postgres answer isn't relevant.