XCOPY still asking (F = file, D = directory) confirmation

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My batch script xcopy is still asking F = file, D = directory confirmation even though I have added /F in the script, the log is showing as below. Please help on how to avoid asking confirmation.

Script:

net use p: /delete  
net use p: "\\200clan\F_Drive" /USER:adm /PERSISTENT:NO-1111
set source=%1
set target=p:/%2

echo %source% %target%

xcopy /S /I /Q /Y /F "%source%" "%target%"

Log:

C:\test\foldera>xcopy /S /I /Q /Y /F "C:/test/folder1/folder2/logs/154/compareReport_177.html" "p:/Services/WSDLCompare/177_20151116/compareReport_177.html"
Does P:\Services\WSDLCompare\177_20151116\UIReport_177.html specify a file name
or directory name on the target
(F = file, D = directory)? 

BATCH file asks for file or folder, The echo f | xcopy trick does not work on localized versions of a file name or directory name on the target (F = file, D = directory)? F C:23.txt  /I If destination does not exist and copying more than one file, assumes that destination must be a directory. I remember having to tricking xcopy once upon a time by using wildcards in the source file name; but making them so specific that the file I wanted was the only one that matched (i.e.

Put a * behind the target file. This suppress the question and defaults to File.

Xcopy file1 file2*

Xcopy file1 file2\ 

defaults to folder.

XCopy - Force (F)ile or (D)irectory by default - TechNet, Ask a question. Quick access Press D if you want the file or files to be copied to a directory. You can suppress this Forcing a FILE or directory can be done by ECHOING the F into xcopy through a pipe ECHO F|xcopy . If Source is a directory or contains wildcards and Destination does not exist, xcopy assumes Destination specifies a directory name and creates a new directory. Then, xcopy copies all specified files into the new directory. By default, xcopy prompts you to specify whether Destination is a file or a directory.

xcopy doesn't know the target is a directory. You clarify this by putting a backslash at the end:

xcopy /S /I /Q /Y /F "%source%" "%target%\"

xcopy, C:\Users>xcopy sushantg\A\* sushantg\B /s /e /h /T Does sushantg\B specify a file name or directory name on the target (F = file, D = directory)? Does sushantg\B  Is there a reason you need to overwrite every file? I f you add /m to this "xcopy D: otes /S N: otes" change it to "xcopy D: otes /m/S N: otes" only the files that have been added to the folder or the files that have changed since the last time you ran the batch file will be copied. I'm using Win 2K.

When copying a single file with XCOPY, there is no option to indicate if the destination is a filename or a directory (with the filename defaulting to that of the source file). In such cases XCOPY will prompt with a (locale specific) message like:

C:> xcopy foo.txt bar.txt

it prompts Does foo.txt specify a file name or directory name on the target (F = file, D = directory)?

Adding a wildcard (*) to the end of the destination will suppress this prompt and default to copying as a file:

C:> xcopy foo.txt bar.txt* 1 File(s) copied

This requires the source and target file extensions to be the same length, typically 3 characters.

for more information: https://ss64.com/nt/xcopy.html

need to copy folder with sub folder without answering prompt , XCOPY. Copy files and/or directory trees to another folder. XCOPY is similar to the COPY While still included in Windows 10, Xcopy has been deprecated in favor of /Y Suppress prompt to confirm overwriting a file. can be preset in the COPYCMD env variable. echo F| XCOPY C:\utils\MyFile.txt D:\Backup\CopyFile​.txt The xcopy command is a Command Prompt command used to copy one or more files and/or folders from one location to another location. The xcopy command, with its many options and ability to copy entire directories, is similar to, but much more powerful than, the traditional copy command.

Removing the destination filename will suppress the message. This works for me!

Xcopy - Copy files and folders - Windows CMD, XCOPY still asking (F = file, D = directory) confirmation - The /I switch (not /F as you mentioned in your question) prevents xcopy from asking whether the  Copy files and/or directory trees to another folder. XCOPY is similar to the COPY command except that it has additional switches to specify both the source and destination in detail. While still included in Windows 10, Xcopy has been deprecated in favor of Robocopy , a more powerful copy tool, which is now built into Windows Server and Desktop operating systems [ x ]

XCOPY still asking (F = file, D = directory) confirmation, xcopy , My batch script xcopy is still asking F = file, D = directory confirmation even though I added /F in the script, log it is showing as below. Please help on the is how  Purpose: Copies directories, subdirectories, and files. XCOPY copies files or groups of files to and from directories, and is especially useful for copying data to and from a fixed disk. The first path designation specifies the source file(s); the second path designation specifies the target file(s).

XCOPY still asking (F = file, D = directory) confirmation, My batch script xcopy is still asking F = file, D = directory confirmation even though I have added /F in the script, the log is showing as below. ..You see, you must specify the target directory, of where to copy the files to, here's an example of syntax: xcopy "fileToCopy.ext" "c:\directoryToCopyTo" /Y However, you've specified two files (or, at least, the INPUT.txt takes the form of a file).

Xcopy Command (Examples, Options, Switches, and More), The xcopy command is used to copy files from one place to another. Prompt command used to copy one or more files or folders from one location to another location. with /d option and a specific date, in MM-DD-YYYY format, to copy files /f, This option will display the full path and file name of both the 

Comments
  • In case you don't bother to go through all the details and options of xcopy add a back-slash at the end of your target path %target\%
  • Very good answer. I just want to add that F for file and D for directory are only the right characters on English Windows. For example on a German Windows D is for a file (German: Datei) and V is for a directory (German: Verzeichnis). If an OS language independent solution is needed for copying a single file with xcopy which can't be copied with copy, look on batch code on this answer on BATCH file asks for file or folder.
  • Adding the slash to the end of the target directory fixed it for me. It no longer asks if the path is a file or directory. Thanks!
  • I keep seeing this as a suggestion and I have to say after testing it, it doesn't work as advertised. The wildcard (*) is still a wildcard so it will try to match anything that starts with file2 (using the same example above). I recommend using the piping method instead which is kind of silly, but it works. I wish that there was a switch that just said "It's always a file" or "It's always a directory".
  • This helped my situation, even though it is technically not the correct answer for the original post. The example target variable included the full path plus filename, so adding a backslash at the end will only confuse things for the original poster. If the source is a single file and the target is a folder, as it is in my case, adding the backslash to the target and using the /i switch made the File/Directory question go away and the directory was then correctly presumed.