Undo git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>

git update-index --assume-unchanged wildcard
undo assume-unchanged git eclipse
git update-index assume-unchanged directory
git assume-unchanged unable to mark file
tortoise git assume unchanged
git update-index --assume-unchanged example
git status refresh index
git assume unchanged directory

The way you Git ignore watching/tracking a particular dir/file. you just run this:

git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>

Now how do you undo it so they are watched again? (Let's call it un-assume.)


To get undo/show dir's/files that are set to assume-unchanged run this:

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>

To get a list of dir's/files that are assume-unchanged run this:

git ls-files -v|grep '^h'

Undo git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>, In order to get undo/show dir's/files that are set to assume-unchanged run this: $ git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>. In order to get  In order to get undo/show dir's/files that are set to assume-unchanged run this: $ git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file> In order to get a list of dir's/files that are assume-unchanged run this:


If this is a command that you use often - you may want to consider having an alias for it as well. Add to your global .gitconfig:

[alias]
    hide = update-index --assume-unchanged
    unhide = update-index --no-assume-unchanged

How to set an alias (if you don't know already):

git config --configLocation alias.aliasName 'command --options'

Example:

git config --global alias.hide 'update-index --assume-unchanged'
git config... etc

After saving this to your .gitconfig, you can run a cleaner command.

git hide myfile.ext

or

git unhide myfile.ext

This git documentation was very helpful.

As per the comments, this is also a helpful alias to find out what files are currently being hidden:

[alias]
    hidden = ! git ls-files -v | grep '^h' | cut -c3-

Git undo assume-unchanged, I searched a long time until I found this question on stackoverflow: version control - undo a git update-index --assume-unchanged - Stack  Did you ever just mark a file as "assume-unchanged" and wanted to take that back? I searched a long time until I found this question on stackoverflow: version control - undo a git update-index --assume-unchanged - Stack Overflow


git update-index function has several option you can find typing as below:

git update-index --help

Here you will find various option - how to handle with the function update-index.

[if you don't know the file name]

git update-index --really-refresh 

[if you know the file name ]

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>

will revert all the files those have been added in ignore list through.

git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>

git-update-index Documentation, Remove the file from the index even when the working directory still has such a Note that "assume unchanged" bit is not set if git update-index --refresh finds  This option also works with other update-index options like really-refresh. Use the following commands: # Assume a file will be unchanged git update-index --assume-unchanged path/to/file # Undo that assumption git update-index --no-assume-unchanged path/to/file Again, this setting applies only to the local repository – it is not applied globally.


I assume (heh) you meant --assume-unchanged, since I don't see any --assume-changed option. The inverse of --assume-unchanged is --no-assume-unchanged.

Ignoring files on git, but just for a while with assume-unchanged , You can type git update-index --assume-unchanged <file> to temporarily exclude the file from any tracking, pretending it never changed. A while ago I did this to ignore changes to a file tracked by git: git update-index --skip-worktree &lt;file&gt; Now I actually want to commit changes to that file to source. How do I undo the ef


To synthesize the excellent original answers from @adardesign, @adswebwork and @AnkitVishwakarma, and comments from @Bdoserror, @Retsam, @seanf, and @torek, with additional documentation links and concise aliases...

Basic Commands

To reset a file that is assume-unchanged back to normal:

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>

To list all files that are assume-unchanged:

git ls-files -v | grep '^[a-z]' | cut -c3-

To reset all assume-unchanged files back to normal:

git ls-files -v | grep '^[a-z]' | cut -c3- | xargs git update-index --no-assume-unchanged --

Note: This command which has been listed elsewhere does not appear to reset all assume-unchanged files any longer (I believe it used to and previously listed it as a solution):

git update-index --really-refresh

Shortcuts

To make these common tasks easy to execute in git, add/update the following alias section to .gitconfig for your user (e.g. ~/.gitconfig on a *nix or macOS system):

[alias]
    hide = update-index --assume-unchanged
    unhide = update-index --no-assume-unchanged
    unhide-all = ! git ls-files -v | grep '^[a-z]' | cut -c3- | xargs git update-index --no-assume-unchanged --
    hidden = ! git ls-files -v | grep '^[a-z]' | cut -c3-

[100% Working Code], To get undo/show dir's/files that are set to assume-unchanged run this: git update​-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>. To get a list of dir's/files  git: assume unchanged bit not set. git. While the actual behavior may have changed between versions, this is an implementation detail. Fundamentally, assume-unchanged is a mechanism to allow Git to avoid hitting the filesystem to look for changes. It means that Git may avoid looking at the files, it doesn't mean that Git must avoid looking at


Git remove file from index (assume unchanged), Command below will tell git you want to start ignoring the changes to the file: $ git update-index --assume-unchanged path/to/file. When you  Note that "assume unchanged" bit is not set if git update-index --refresh finds the working tree file matches the index (use git update-index --really-refresh if you want to mark them as "assume unchanged").


Undo git update-index --skip-worktree, git update-index --no-skip-worktree $(git ls-files -v | sls -pattern "^S"| %{$_. Right click on the file and choose Unflag as skip-worktree and assume-​unchanged  git update-index --assume-unchanged <file> Then when you want to track changes again: git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file> Obviously there’s quite a few caveats that come into play with this. If you git add the file directly, it will be added to the index. Merging a commit with this flag on will cause the merge to fail gracefully so


Git Assume Unchanged, The way you Git ignore watching/tracking a particular dir/file. you just run this: git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>. Now how do you  git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file> Instead of fixed file paths, you can use wildcards to ignore all files in a directory with <directory/*>. List affected files: git ls-files -v | grep ^[a-z] <path> git ls-files shows the file status represented by a letter. If a lowercase letter is used, the file is marked as “assume unchanged”.